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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Rock Creek, Menard County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
nced rapidly in line of battle across a cornfield which lay between us and the base of the hill, the enemy opening upon us briskly as soon as we were unmasked. Rock creek, waist-deep in some places, was waded, and now the whole line, except the First North Carolina, held in reserve on our left flank, pressed up the steep acclivitit was done, not before a charge of the enemy, but in obedience to orders, and we were not pursued, nor were the works occupied by the Federals until we reached Rock creek, at the base of the hill. A few of our men on our left, rather than incur the danger of retiring down the hill under that very heavy fire, remained behind in the entrenchments and gave themselves up. The base of the hill reached, skirmishers were thrown out, and we remained on the west side of Rock creek till 11} P. M., when we retired silently and unmolested. I find the following record in my diary referring to the time when we retired to the foot of the hill: New troops were brough
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
heir arrival may be fixed by the circumstance which I distintly remember, viz: the arrival of General Lee upon the field, his survey of the enemy's position on Cemetery Hill with his glass, and the dispatch of one of his staff immediately in the direction of the town. Passing over the scene of conflict, where the line of battle re turnpike, which I think it commanded. Its capture was a breach in the enemy's lines through which troops might have been poured and the strong positions of Cemetery Hill rendered untenable. General Howard says: The ground was rough, and the woods so thick that their generals did not realize till morning what they had gained. left of the Baltimore pike [McAllister's Hill], followed the signal, and one after another opened up, till every little crest between Slocum's headquarters and Cemetery Hill began belching its thunder. . . . Still no artillery response from the rebels. --Page 143.--Atlantic Monthly, July, 1876, page 66. But all the efforts of th
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ve. It was past 6 P. M. before our brigade was ordered forward-nearly twenty-four hours after we had gotten into position. We were to storm the eastern face of Culp's Hill, a rough and rugged eminence on the southeast of the town, which formed the key to the enemy's right-centre. Passing first through a small skirt of woods, we anthly, July, 1876. I was at a loss to account for it until I observed that General Howard describes the vacated works as situated between McAllister's Mill and Culp's Hill. Fronm these works part of the Twelfth corps had been withdrawn to reinforce Meade's left But these were not the works occupied by Steuart's brigade, whose cha(10 to 11) the right of the works was held by the brigade of General Daniel. Then came General Ewell's order to assume the offensive and assail the crest of Culp's Hill, on our right. My diary says that both General Steuart and General Daniel, who now came up with his brigade to support the movement, strongly disapproved of ma
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
he execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1863.--Broke camp near Sharpsburg, and passing through Hagerstown, halted 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to m
Greencastle (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
lery which was detached from the Second corps on the 24th June, under the command of Brigadier-General George H. Steuart, and ordered to Mercersburg and McConnellsburg. In the execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1863.--Broke camp near Sharpsburg, and passing through Hagerstown, halted 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-A
McConnellsburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
artillery which was detached from the Second corps on the 24th June, under the command of Brigadier-General George H. Steuart, and ordered to Mercersburg and McConnellsburg. In the execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry underMcConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 mil
Mercersburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ll to its lot the week previous. It formed part of an expeditionary force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery which was detached from the Second corps on the 24th June, under the command of Brigadier-General George H. Steuart, and ordered to Mercersburg and McConnellsburg. In the execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1863.--Broke camp near Sharpsburg, and passing through Hagerstown, halted 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ne 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to march back to Chambersbu'rg. Great surprise expressed. Marched 11 miles and camped 1 mile south of Stowstown. Tuesday, June 30.--Column moved at 5 A. M. Passed through Shippensburg, to Greenvillage, where we took left road to Fayetteville. Wednesday, July 1.--Column moved at 7 A. M. Passed through Fayetteville. On top of mountain heard rapid cannonading. Soon saw the smoke of the battle, and then of burning houses. Hurried to the; front, but
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 3.28
Shall we not have a number of earnest workers in this direction? Photographs or Engravings of leading Confederates are a very desirable part of our material. We wish to hand down to posterity the features of the men who made our glorious history, and we should be under special obligations to friends who can make additions to our collection. Mr. M. Miley, of Lexington, Va., has sent us a superb collection of his photographs, embracing the following: President Jefferson Davis, General R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-General Stonewall Jackson, Lieutenant-General J. A. Early, Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Major-General Fitz. Lee, Major-General G. W. C. Lee, Major-General W. H. F. Lee, and Brigadier-General W. N. Pendleton. For accuracy of likeness and beauty of execution these photographs are unsurpassed, and we would be very glad to see them in the homes of our people in place of the miserable daubs so frequently found. And we, of course, feel none the less kindly towards Mi
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 3.28
ho can make additions to our collection. Mr. M. Miley, of Lexington, Va., has sent us a superb collection of his photographs, embracing the following: President Jefferson Davis, General R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-General Stonewall Jackson, Lieutenant-General J. A. Early, Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Major-General Fitz. Lee, Ma was not eclipsed by his world-wide fame as a scientist, and many other men of mark whom we may not now even mention. The following beautiful letter from ex-President Davis was read at the recent laying of the corner-stone of the Confederate monument at Macon, Ga., and so appropriately gives voice to the sentiments of the peopln mournful tones the Answer fit: And if our children must obey, They must, but thinking on our day, 'Twill less debase them to submit. Yours faithfully, Jefferson Davis. Back volumes can be furnished now, but the supply is by no means inexhaustible, and we would advise those desiring to secure them to do so at once.
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