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September 25th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
osition there. The sand-bags of embrasures to be kept wet during action. The Yates traversing arrangements in Moultrie and the outside batteries appear to be all out of order, which was not the case in Fort Sumter. Order an ordnance officer to see to this at once. If Colonel Yates be available, order him to make an investigation forthwith. Respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Fielden, Capt. and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 25th, 1863. Lieut.-Col. D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer, etc., etc.: Colonel,—I am instructed to say in this way what has already been communicated to you verbally by the Commanding General—that he approves of every measure practicable to give Fort Sumter means for contributing to the general defence of the entrance of the harbor; and, therefore, he desires certain casemates in northeast face, which Major-General Gilmer Promoted, about the 15th of September, 1863. has designated in his communic
September 23rd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
inform you that the enemy is constructing a battery in rear of the middle of Black Island. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The Commanding General instructs me to inquire if Fort Sumter is amply provided with water. He also directs that, in the daytime, our batteries only fire on Morrior the purpose of annoying the enemy's communication between Fort Pulaski and Hilton Head. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,--It is the wish of the Commanding General that you call on Generals Hagood, Colquitt, and Taliaferro, and Colonels Keitt and Harrison, to furnish the names of such o
September 29th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ortheast face, which Major-General Gilmer Promoted, about the 15th of September, 1863. has designated in his communication of the 23d instant, to be put in condition to receive two 10-inch columbiads, one 42-pounder, and one 32-pounder, rifled and banded; these pieces to be thoroughly protected from a rear and vertical fire of the enemy's batteries. Respectfully, your obdt. servt., Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 29th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The Commanding General instructs me to inquire whether the traversing arrangements of the guns on Sullivan's Island have been put in order. They needed repairs last week. He desires also that you will send an artificer to Fort Ripley to remedy the defects in the traversing arrangements of the guns at that point, as they are represented as being out of order. The General also directs that Fort Ripley be supp
September 30th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ith one hundred and fifty to two hundred rounds of shot to the gun. There are now only one hundred and twenty-eight. Finally, the General directs me to say that there is too much powder at Fort Ripley. The surplus will be removed to Castle Pinckney, if required there for its three guns, one of which will be added to its present arrangement. Very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Clifton H. Smith, Asst. Adjt.-Genl. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 30th, 1863. General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-General, Richmond, Va.: General,—The published report of Brigadier-General Gillmore, of the 7th instant, to his government, relative to his acquisition of Batteries Wagner and Gregg, contains several errors, which I feel called upon to correct. 1st. Seventy-five men were not taken on Morris Island, for only two boats' crews—about 19 men and 27 sailors, or about 46 men in all—were captured by the enemy's armed barges between Cummings's Point <
July 20th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ork purporting to be a true exposition of Confederate history is beyond comprehension. The facts are these: Colonel Elliott, who had been promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General, was relieved, on the 4th of May, 1864, from the command of Fort Sumter, and sent to Virginia, to take charge of Walker's brigade, of South Carolina. The successor of General Elliott at the fort was Captain John C. Mitchel, of the 1st South Carolina Artillery (Regulars). He remained in command until the 20th of July, 1864, when, during the third regular bombardment of Sumter, he was killed by a mortar-shell. Captain Mitchel was a son of the distinguished Irish patriot, and a highly accomplished and daring officer. On his death Captain T. A. Huguenin, of the South Carolina Infantry (Regulars), was appointed in his place, and held command of Sumter until its evacuation, on the 17th of February, 1865—nearly eight months after General Elliott had been relieved. The evacuation of Sumter was effected at ni
n 1500 and 1600 effective men on the day of the evacuation (6th inst.), for Colonel Keitt reported that morning 900 men, all told, only about two-thirds of whom could be considered effectives; the others being wounded, or more or less disabled from exposure for so long a period to the weather and the incessant fire, day and night, of the enemy's land and naval batteries. The forces holding these works and the north end of Morris Island, during the fifty-eight days siege, varied from 1000 to 1200 men, seldom exceeding the latter number when it could be avoided. 3d. Battery Wagner was not a work of the most formidable kind, but an ordinary field-work, with thick parapets, but with ditches of little depth. The sand thrown up by the enemy's shells and drifted by the wind, during so long a siege, had nearly filled up the ditches in many places, and had partially covered up the explosive shells, spiked planks, and pikes placed in the ditch for its defence. See also General Gillmore'
November 2nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
shed man. When the President left Charleston, General Beauregard escorted him once more, and was among the last to take leave of him at the Northeastern Railroad Depot. In the Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government—unless we are mistaken—Mr. Davis makes no mention of his visit to Charleston. If there is any reference to it in that work it is in such an incidental manner that we have not been able to discover the passage. And again, in that book, as in his address of the 2d of November, 1863, already referred to, he gives the merest passing notice to a period including fully nineteen months of the war; thus omitting to enlighten the student of history, and compelling him to look elsewhere for the evidence of facts which Mr. Davis apparently considered too insignificant to deserve particular mention. He says: The brave and invincible defence of Fort Sumter gave to the City of Charleston, South Carolina, additional lustre. For four years that fort, located in its harb
November 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
g for some days, the Commanding General directs that all the batteries bearing on it shall be held ready at night to sweep its exterior faces, at a concerted signal from Major Elliott, or whensoever the approach of hostile boats shall be evident. Concert of action, however, is most desirable. This order was also sent to Brigadier-General Hagood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 1st, 1863. His Excellency M. L. Bonham, Governor of South Carolina, etc., etc.: Governor,—Your letter of the 24th inst. enclosing one from Colonel Waddy Thompson, and another from Messrs. Pullian and Patten, has been received. I have ordered a light battery to report at once to Colonel Williams, at Greenville, S. C. I regret as much as you do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already
July 10th (search for this): chapter 8
ore's guns on Morris Island, but at the distance of four miles from his advanced battery to the nearest point of the city. I will conclude by stating that, strange as it may appear, the total loss in killed and wounded on Morris Island, from July 10th to September 7th, 1863, was only 641 men; and, deducting the killed and wounded due to the landing on the 10th of July, and to the assaults of the 11th and 18th of July, the killed and wounded due to the terrible bombardment, which lasted almos10th of July, and to the assaults of the 11th and 18th of July, the killed and wounded due to the terrible bombardment, which lasted almost uninterruptedly, night and day, during fifty-eight days, only amounted to 296 men, many of whom were only slightly wounded. It is still more remarkable that during the same period of time, when the enemy fired 6202 shots and shells at Fort Sumter, varying in weight from 30 pounds to 300 pounds, only 3 men were killed and 14 wounded. Indeed, the hand of the Almighty would seem to have protected the heroic garrison of that historic work. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard
November 4th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
u do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already too small forces a regiment of old troops from the defence of Charleston. So soon as it can be done with safety I will gladly send all the assistance in my power to Governor Vance. I remain, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 4th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—Enclosed is a telegram This telegram, like many others from the same source, proved to be erroneous. received from Major Norris, Chief of Signal Corps, Richmond. The Commanding General wishes you to make all necessary arrangements for the contingency, and with a view to the rapid reinforcement of the command on Sullivan's Island from the troops in Christ Church, which portion of your district, however, sho
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