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Austin A. King (search for this): chapter 19
ther buildings, fired by Forrest. See page 519. We spent a greater part of the next day there. It, too, must have been a beautiful city in its best estate before the war. It was growing rapidly, being the great coal and cotton depot of that region. Its streets were broad, and many of them shaded; and, in all parts of the town, we noticed ever and full-flowing fountains of water, rising from artesian wells, one of which forms the tail-piece of this chapter. It received its title from Senator King of Alabama, the Vice-President elected with President Pierce. The name may be found in the poems of Ossian. We left Selma toward evening, and at sunset our vessel was moored a few minutes at Cahawba, to land a passenger whose name has been mentioned, as the entertainer of Wilson and Forrest. See page 518. Our voyage to Mobile did not end until the morning of the third day, when we had traveled, from Montgomery, nearly four hundred miles. In that fine City of the Gulf we spent suffi
J. B. Carr (search for this): chapter 19
ort, seven miles due east from Mobile. Canby perceived the necessity of reducing this work before passing on to Blakely; and, on the following morning, March 27. before ten o'clock, it was completely invested, on the land side. The divisions of Carr and McArthur, of the Sixteenth Corps, were, at first, on the right, the extreme of the former resting on Bayou Minette, and Benton's division of the Thirteenth Corps, was on the left, its extreme touching at Belle Rose. The remainder of the Sixtentric fire from all his heavy guns, his field-pieces, and the gun-boats, and, if necessary, by the troops. This was begun toward sunset on the 8th of April, and soon afterward, two companies of the Eighth Iowa, Colonel Bell, of Gedde's brigade of Carr's division, were sent as pickets and sharp-shooters, to gain a crest near the fort, intrench, and pick off the Confederate artillerists. This was done gallantly, in the face of a brisk fire, for General Gibson had doubled his line of sharp-shoote
d, under General Gibson. From the beginning of the siege, the garrison had looked for assistance from General Forrest, then between Mobile and Montgomery, but Wilson was keeping him too thoroughly occupied in the interior to allow him to leave. The garrison displayed great courage and resolution. It made at least a dozen sorties during the siege. One of them, made on the 30th of March, was a brilliant success. At sunset the bombardment had ceased, when a party of the garrison, under Captain Watson, concealed by the smoke. rushed out over their works and captured Captain Stearns, of the Seventh Vermont, with twenty men, who were on the front skirmish line. The key to Mobile was now in the hands of the Nationals. Prisoners told the men of the navy where torpedoes were planted, when thirty-five of them were fished up, and the squadron moved in safety almost within shelling distance of the city. The army turned its face toward Blakely, on the east bank of the Appalachee, an ins
John Ellis Wool (search for this): chapter 19
extent. The roads were in a rough condition, the cars were wretched in accommodations, and the passengers were few. The latter were chiefly Northern business men. We arrived at Augusta early in the morning, and after breakfast took seats in a very comfortable car for Atlanta. It was a warm, pleasant day, and the passengers were many. Among them the writer had the pleasure of discovering two highly-esteemed friends, Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Hart, of Troy, New York, who were then members of General Wool's family. traveling for the purpose of seeing the country; and he enjoyed their most agreeable companionship many days, until parting at New Orleans. We had just reached the beginning of the more picturesque hill-country of Georgia, which seemed to be peculiarly charming in the region of Crawfordsville, the home of Stephens, the Vice-President of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand o
thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, the fugitives left behind them, would allow. Upton passed the Cahawba with his whole division, puevallo on the afternoon of the 31st of March. Upton was just ready to move forward. Just then thetheir appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands ofuted with a loss of fifty men made prisoners. Upton bivouacked fourteen miles south of Montevallord from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, summerville road, on which he was posted, while Upton, with three hundred picked men, should turn th action at that time, and made disposition for Upton to immediately participate in the work begun bhe 16th, he found one of the bridges on fire. Upton's division, was at once arranged for an assauled from Columbus for the same destination, and Upton's marched the next day. Minty, accompanied by [6 more...]
rong. While these movements were in progress on the borders of the bay, General Steele, with Hawkins's division of negro troops, and Lucas's cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, tal St. John Lidell. Ever since Steele's arrival from Pensacola, his troops, and particularly Hawkins's negro division, had held Fort Blakely, as the works there were called, in a state of siege; aby formed a strong line of battle, with additional cannon brought up from before Spanish Fort. Hawkins's dusky followers were on its right, the divisions of Generals J. C. Veatch and C. C. Andrews, heard. That artillery of heaven was soon made inaudible to the armies, by the roar of cannon. Hawkins's division first skirmished heavily toward the works, when Garrard sent one-third of his comman, not only by the center, but by the right, where the brigades of Pile, Schofield, and Drew, of Hawkins's negro division, were at work, at twilight, fighting Mississippians, as their dusky brethren d
es. Wilson arrived at Montevallo on the afternoon of the 31st of March. Upton was just ready to move forward. Just then the Confederates made their appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands of Roddy and Crossland. After a sharp fight with Alexander's brigade, they were routed by a charge of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, and driven in confusion toward Randolph. They attempted to make a stand at Six-mile Creek, south of Montevallo, but were again tery was doing noble service in a duel with the cannon of the enemy, two of which it dismounted. The Confederates were dispersed. The elated victors swept on in an irresistible current, and Selma soon became a conquered city. Generals Forrest, Roddy, and Armstrong, with about one-half of their followers, fled eastward on the Burnsville or river road, by the light of twenty-five thousand bales of blazing cotton, which they had set on fire. They were pursued until after midnight, and in that
William Dennison (search for this): chapter 19
ons were cleared, and while Harris's brigade was passing the ditch and climbing the face of the works, those of Gilbert and Rinaker turned the right of the fort and entered it, capturing General Thomas and a thousand men. In an instant, a loud cheer arose, and several National flags were unfurled over the parapets. While the struggle was going on upon the left, the whole line was participating in the assault. The center was feeling the storm from the Works more seriously than the left. Dennison's brigade, of Veatch's division, and those of Spicely and Moore, of Andrews's division, were nobly braving the hail as they pushed onward in a charge, so soon as Garrard was fairly at work. Steadily they pressed forward, men falling at almost every step; and when Andrews's column was within forty yards of the works, it was terribly smitten by the fire of eight guns, that made lanes through its ranks. At the same time, the Eighty-third Ohio and Ninety-seventh Illinois, pushing forward as s
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 19
t in that region. The grand movements in Georgia and in Middle Tennessee occupied the attention of all. At length, when Sherman had finished his triumphal march through Georgia, to the sea-board, and Thomas had decimated Hood's army in Middle Tennet, and the virtual ending of the war. Hostile operations were then, suspended, in accordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, ouse we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand of Sherman, when he began his march to the sea, in the ruins of railway stations, twisted iron rails, and charred ties, along the ronuments of Wilson's destructive marches. His sweep through that region was almost as desolating as were the marches of Sherman, but in a narrower track. But among all these scathings of the hand of man, the beneficent powers of Nature were at wor
ories there. The adventures of that brigade, which did not rejoin the main body until the expedition had ended, we shall consider presently. Upton's division was impelled forward. The small Confederate force found at Elyton, was driven across the Cahawba to Montevallo, as sharply pursued as felled trees, which the fugitives left behind them, would allow. Upton passed the Cahawba with his whole division, pushed on to Montevallo, and in that region destroyed the large Red Mountain, Central, Bibb, and Columbiana Iron-works, the Cahawba Rolling-mills, and five important collieries. These were all in operation, and were a serious loss to the Confederates. Wilson arrived at Montevallo on the afternoon of the 31st of March. Upton was just ready to move forward. Just then the Confederates made their appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands of Roddy and Crossland. After a sharp fight with Alexander's brigade, they were routed by a cha
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