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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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ley to attack Banks's rear in the Shenandoah, Shields had already left, and gone eastwards across tn the Pike, and were positively informed that Shields and Fremont were already there. These commannt could not well attack us on the flank, and Shields was doomed to be a spectator for want of bridfor a few hours, hoping that in the mean time Shields could devise means for crossing. Those fe a further development of the enemy's plans. Shields's division was on the east, and Fremont's on s here apparent, for had we been less active, Shields would have advanced up the east bank of the rnt in a little valley, it was discovered that Shields's cavalry advance was endeavoring to surprisedistance of three miles, determined to attack Shields on the other side of the river. His entire fo move forward from the mountains, Tyler (for Shields was absent) seemed content to stay where he whe east side of the river, and were thrashing Shields's command, he formed his division and marched[7 more...]
Turner Ashby (search for this): chapter 31
y Shields and Fremont battle of cross Keys Ashby killed battle of Port Republic end of the Vashing along the muddy roads as best we might, Ashby and his cavalry in the rear skirmishing and brte, cavalry skirmishing was incessant, so that Ashby's regiment of one thousand men was completely oping forward, and we retired. The brigade of Ashby now came up, and, with loud shouts, attacked tg that the enemy's infantry were near at hand, Ashby sent information to Ewell, who soon counterma broke and ran, and while doing so, out rushed Ashby's cavalry, and overtaking them in open ground,e of the universal grief when this was known. Ashby, the chivalric cavalry leader, loved by all,, They gave us no time to prepare to meet them. Ashby had but begun to form his men, before three reded not until this infantry opened fire. Here Ashby drew up his men, and remained beneath their fi of cavalry. The infantry having arrived, Generals Ashby, Ewell, and Stewart (of Maryland) led them[12 more...]
y one. We had beaten back the enemy, it is true; but not a thousand such successful combats could compensate for the untimely death of our beloved and gentle Ashby; meek as a child in peace, fierce as a tiger in battle, night and day in the saddle, ever restless and watchful, always in advance when danger threatened. To see him ride to the front in the crisis of battle, and, waving his sword, shout out, Follow me! was a sight which none will forget who witnessed it. Gentle, good, kind, Christian, heroic soldier, a host in himself — may he rest his honored head in peace, and posterity honor his name for his countless acts of daring and chivalry! Having retreated during the night, we halted two miles from the village of Port Republic, and watched a further development of the enemy's plans. Shields's division was on the east, and Fremont's on the west side of the Shenandoah River, nearly parallel, and it seemed the latter was desirous of attacking Jackson while Shields should c
amounted to three hundred, and that of the enemy to one thousand, not counting the fight of Cross Keys, where our loss was three hundred, and that of Fremont five hundred. Thus ended Jackson's memorable campaign in the Valley, a chapter in history which is without parallel, but though the majority think that these movements were all his own, it may not be so. He was constantly in receipt of orders from Lee, and he faithfully obeyed them. No man in the army is half so obedient as old Stonewall, or so determined to be obeyed; the result is, that no army has shown greater endurance, marched farther, fought more frequently, suffered less, or done half the work that has fallen to our lot. Our men seem to know intuitively the designs of their commanders, and they second them without a murmur. Where we are marching to now, I cannot form the least idea, but as we move eastward, it is whispered that we go to Charlottesville to recruit, and after being heavily reenforced, may reenter th
mont was unwilling, were he able, to cross and join commands, Jackson opened the fight with great vigor, being determined to close his brilliant Valley campaign with a signal victory over his old enemy. Afraid to move forward from the mountains, Tyler (for Shields was absent) seemed content to stay where he was, and would not meet us in open ground, so that we suffered somewhat in approaching him. Several attempts were made to turn his flanks, and capture the guns, without success, yet in ever-quick, dodged the enemy's volley, and rushing into them with the bayonet, drove them in confusion on the centre, which Jackson was now assailing with every disposable man, shot and shell flying over us, and dealing destruction on the enemy. Tyler perceived that all was over, that his troops were thoroughly beaten, and could not be rallied, and now fought desperately to keep open the road for retreat. The destruction was immense, for crowded as they were, every shot told with marked effec
imit, and seldom was a summons to surrender heard. The scattered fragments of the three regiments hid themselves behind their column of infantry three miles beyond the point of attack; and the pursuit ended not until this infantry opened fire. Here Ashby drew up his men, and remained beneath their fire, and waited for reenforcements from Jackson. We took forty-four prisoners-among them the colonel commanding the brigade of cavalry. The infantry having arrived, Generals Ashby, Ewell, and Stewart (of Maryland) led them to the fight. Here Ashby's gallantry could not have been excelled. Having led the First Maryland regiment in a charge, which sent the enemy flying from that quarter, he sought the Fifty-eighth Virginia, and still between the two fires he ordered the charge. His horse fell dead; he arose, beckoned to the men, and whilst in the very act, a ball entered low in his left side, came out near the right breast, and shattered his right wrist. Falling mortally wounded, not
r 30: June Jackson in the Valley Shields and Fremont battle of cross Keys Ashby killed battle of Port Republic end of the Valley campaign, and rout of the enemy. Charlottesville, June 20th, 1862. Dear friend: In my last I informed you that before Jackson left Page Valley to attack Banks's rear in the Shenandoah, Shields had already left, and gone eastwards across the Blue Ridge, towards Fredericksburgh; also, that Fremont was across the Alleghanies, with Milroy and Blenker, too distant to afford Banks any support, so that we were enabled to attack him with impunity. You will remember that Banks, after his route, crossed the Potomac, and that our army remained in possession of the immense booty we had taken. I will now relate the events that followed. Jackson was now anxiously watching the movements of Shields and Fremont, who from the east and west might cross the mountains, re-enter the valley, and cut off his retreat. We had not lain idle more than a
iver, and were thrashing Shields's command, he formed his division and marched from Harrisonburgh towards the scene, and finding the bridge gone, began shelling across in all directions; this he continued doing for several hours, so that many who were burying the enemy's dead were killed or maimed. White flags were displayed, but this heroic gentleman would not respect our labors, but continued firing without intermission long after the fight had closed! How very valiant this was! General Patterson, in a recent speech at Philadelphia, gave Fremont's character in brief. He declared that he was a statesman without a speech, a soldier without a battle, and a millionaire with nary red. He could only abbreviate the description by calling him an unmitigated humbug. His staff usually comprised nearly sixty officers. When night closed in we found that our killed and wounded amounted to three hundred, and that of the enemy to one thousand, not counting the fight of Cross Keys, wh
Elijah White (search for this): chapter 31
t their vengeance seemed insatiable, while an enemy remained in sight. But the most singular incident of the day was Fremont's behavior. Hearing that we had crossed to the east side of the river, and were thrashing Shields's command, he formed his division and marched from Harrisonburgh towards the scene, and finding the bridge gone, began shelling across in all directions; this he continued doing for several hours, so that many who were burying the enemy's dead were killed or maimed. White flags were displayed, but this heroic gentleman would not respect our labors, but continued firing without intermission long after the fight had closed! How very valiant this was! General Patterson, in a recent speech at Philadelphia, gave Fremont's character in brief. He declared that he was a statesman without a speech, a soldier without a battle, and a millionaire with nary red. He could only abbreviate the description by calling him an unmitigated humbug. His staff usually compri
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 31
ey campaign, and rout of the enemy. Charlottesville, June 20th, 1862. Dear friend: In my last I informed you that before Jackson left Page Valley to attack Banks's rear in the Shenandoah, Shields had already left, and gone eastwards across the Blue Ridge, towards Fredericksburgh; also, that Fremont was across the Alleghanies, with Milroy and Blenker, too distant to afford Banks any support, so that we were enabled to attack him with impunity. You will remember that Banks, after his route, crossed the Potomac, and that our army remained in possession of the immense booty we had taken. I will now relate the events that followed. Jackson was now aBanks, after his route, crossed the Potomac, and that our army remained in possession of the immense booty we had taken. I will now relate the events that followed. Jackson was now anxiously watching the movements of Shields and Fremont, who from the east and west might cross the mountains, re-enter the valley, and cut off his retreat. We had not lain idle more than a week, when it became known that both those commanders had turned the heads of their respective columns towards Strasburgh, fifty miles to our r
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