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eeting one or two acquaintances. After visiting a mother, whose son had fallen in his command, he returned to his tent. On the 19th of July, he reached Gordonsville with his corps, and took quarters in the hospitable house of Reverend D. B. Ewing, where he had before found a pleasant resting place, when passing through the village. He appeared jaded by his excessive labors, and positively unwell; and said that he had not suffered so much, since his return from Mexico. But the rest, the breezes, and the fresh fruits in which he so much delighted, speedily restored the vigor of his frame. He loved to refresh himself here, after the labors of the day were finished, with the social converse of the amiable family which surrounded Mr. Ewing's board, and with the prattle of his children. One of these, while sitting upon his knee, was captivated with the bright military buttons upon his coat, and petitioned that when the garment was worn out, he should give her one as a keepsake.
his army before the corps of McDowell could reach him. With this object, he purposed at first to continue the pursuit all night. Ascertaining by his scouts that the enemy had paused in their flight just in his front, he now placed the battery of Pegram in position, and opened a hot fire upon them at short range. This new cannonade threw them for a time into great confusion; and had the darkness of the night permitted the victor to see distinctly where his blows should be aimed, he would probably have converted the retreat of the Federals into a disastrous rout; But, after a time, three batteries began to reply to Pegram with such vigor as plainly indicated that Pope had received some fresh supports since the night fell. The indefatigable Colonel William E. Jones also, returning with his regiment of cavalry from a fatiguing expedition, had passed to the front, and ascertained the arrival of the remainder of the corps of Fremont, now commanded by Sigel. The General therefore determin
Charles S. Winder (search for this): chapter 16
enemy, supported by the division of Jackson, commanded by Brigadier-General Winder. The remainder of Ewell's division, consisting of the briefore him, for it was masked in the thick corn. The division of Winder had now arrived, and its commander was posting several of its best he patriots of one of the chief ornaments of their army. While General Winder was standing beside the guns of Poague and Carpenter, directingng. It has been related, how the second brigade of the division of Winder, under Colonel Garnett, had been stationed on the left of the greating with the inspiration of battle; he ordered the batteries which Winder had placed to be instantly withdrawn, to: preserve them from capturmourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded whilst ably discharging his dutmbered blessings. I can hardly think of the fall of Brigadier-General C. S. Winder, without tearful eyes. Let us all unite more earnestly
ing the base of Slaughter's Mountain, by an obscure pathway, at length reached the northeast end, whence, from an open field elevated several hundred feet above the plain, they saw the whole scene of action unfolded beneath them. The battery of Lattimer, with half that of Johnson, was drawn up to this promontory, and skilfully posted, so as to cover with its fire the whole front of the Confederate right and centre. It was to the promptitude with which General Jackson seized this point, and the adroitness with which he employed its advantages, that he was chiefly indebted, in. connection with the bravery of his troops, for his victory. The guns of Lattimer and Johnson, in consequence of the elevation of their position, commanded a wide range of the country below, and were themselves secure from the fire of the enemy. Every shot aimed at them fell short, and buried itself, without ricochet, in the hill-side beneath them; while their gunners, in perfect security, and in a clear atmosp
J. A. Walker (search for this): chapter 16
of the second brigade fought on, man to man, without rank or method, with bayonet thrusts and muskets dubbed, but borne. back like the angry foam on a mighty wave, toward the high road. The third brigade, also, upon the right of the second, was broken; and on both sides of the way the enemy made a vast irruption, in which half of Early's brigade was involved. On his extreme left, next to Taliaferro stood the famous 13th Virginia, which, under the gallant leading of its sturdy Colonel, J. A. Walker, still showed an unbroken front, and fell back, fighting the flood of enemies. The right regiments of Early, under the immediate eye of their veteran General, held their ground like a rampart. But the Federalists were fast gaining their rear in the open field. It was at this fearful moment that the genius of the storm reared his head amidst the tumultuous billows; and in an instant the threatening tide was turned. Jackson appeared in the mid torrent of the highway, his figure insti
William E. Jones (search for this): chapter 16
body of troops continued henceforth to be a part of his-corps. On the 2nd of August, the Federal cavalry occupied the village at Orange Court House, when Colonel William E. Jones, the comrade of Jackson at West Point, commanding the 7th Virginia cavalry, attacked them in front and flank while crowded into the narrow street, and repulsed them with loss. They, however, speedily perceiving the scanty numbers of their assailants, returned to the charge; and threatening to envelop Jones, forced him back in turn. But he retired skirmishing with so much stubbornness, that they pursued him a very short distance, when they withdrew across the river. This affair otteries began to reply to Pegram with such vigor as plainly indicated that Pope had received some fresh supports since the night fell. The indefatigable Colonel William E. Jones also, returning with his regiment of cavalry from a fatiguing expedition, had passed to the front, and ascertained the arrival of the remainder of the co
Samuel Hays (search for this): chapter 16
ose along the highway at the distance of a mile. Across the northeastern end of the ridge, flow the rivulets which form, by their union, Cedar Run, and make their way thence to the Rapid Ann. General Early's brigade of Ewell's division, which held the front, was ordered to advance along the great road and develop the position of the enemy, supported by the division of Jackson, commanded by Brigadier-General Winder. The remainder of Ewell's division, consisting of the brigades of Trimble and Hays, (lately Taylor's) diverged to the right, and skirting the base of Slaughter's Mountain, by an obscure pathway, at length reached the northeast end, whence, from an open field elevated several hundred feet above the plain, they saw the whole scene of action unfolded beneath them. The battery of Lattimer, with half that of Johnson, was drawn up to this promontory, and skilfully posted, so as to cover with its fire the whole front of the Confederate right and centre. It was to the promptitude
is regiment of cavalry from a fatiguing expedition, had passed to the front, and ascertained the arrival of the remainder of the corps of Fremont, now commanded by Sigel. The General therefore determined not to hazard more in the darkness of the night, and commanded the troops to halt and bivouac upon the ground which they had wonral Jackson were between eighteen and twenty thousand. The prisoners captured from the enemy were chiefly from the corps of General Banks; but a few from those of Sigel and McDowell showed that parts of their commands were also engaged. On the 11th of August, Pope requested, by flag of truce, access to the field to bury his dead. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpepper Court House. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banis's, McDowell's and Sigel's commands. We have over fear hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Price. Whilst our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn th
him. Another powerful reason dictated an attack. Jackson's soldierly eye had shown him that the line of the Rapid Ann was the proper one to be held by a defensive army guarding the communications at Gordonsville, and the centre of Virginia; for the commanding heights of the southern bank everywhere dominated over the level plains of the Culpepper border. This judgment was afterward confirmed by the high authority of General Lee, who selected that line for defence against Generals Meade and Grant; and, by its strength, baffled every attempt to force it in front. Pope, then, must not be permitted to occupy it; but it suited the temper of General Jackson to prevent it by an aggressive blow, rather than by a dangerous extension of his inadequate force upon it. Hence, on the 7th of August, he gave orders to his three divisions to move toward Culpepper, and to encamp on that night near Orange Court House. It was on this occasion that the striking witness was borne by his African serv
nd make their way thence to the Rapid Ann. General Early's brigade of Ewell's division, which held ispositions upon the right were completed, General Early had become engaged with the enemy. Throwieries in echelon along the road in the rear of Early's left, whence they delivered a most effectiveby the advance of the Federal infantry against Early, through the Indian corn. This General, handl with two additional batteries, took post upon Early's right. The Confederate line of battle was tl the interval between the second, and that of Early. The whole angle of forest was now filled wit enemy made a vast irruption, in which half of Early's brigade was involved. On his extreme left, the flood of enemies. The right regiments of Early, under the immediate eye of their veteran Genen upon their right, and that of Taliaferro and Early upon their left. Especially did the 13th Virgr own, little complimentary to them. See old Early, they said, riding everywhere, without a singl[5 more...]
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