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Crittenden (search for this): chapter 10
sed. Wright's corps was moved up to support Warren, but it was not deemed necessary to send it across the river until the next morning. General Grant rode during this day, May 23, with Hancock's corps. While halting in the afternoon at a house not far from the river, he was told by the people living there that Lee had rested for a few hours at the same house the day before, and that his entire army had crossed the river. On the morning of the 24th Hancock crossed to the south side. Crittenden's division crossed the river and joined Warren's corps. They advanced against the enemy with a view of dislodging him from his position at Ox Ford, but his lines were found so strong that after a brief encounter our forces withdrew. They had not been able to take with them any artillery. That night our whole army, except one division of Burnside's corps, was on the south side of the river and close up to the enemy's lines. General headquarters were established near Chesterfield Stat
Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 10
ll more unserviceable. Several miles of railway were thus destroyed. The reinforcements which General Grant had predicted would be sent to Lee's army had reached him. Between 12,000 and 15,000 men arrived from the 22d to the 25th of May. Breckinridge had come from the valley of Virginia with nearly all of his forces; Pickett brought a division from the vicinity of Richmond; and Hoke's brigade of Early's division had also been sent to Lee from the Confederate capital. On the 22d, as soon apossibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canals should be destroyed beyond the possibility of repair for weeks. These instructions were given in consequence of the withdrawal of Breckinridge's command, which left the valley of Virginia undefended. When I recrossed the river and returned to headquarters in the evening, I found General Grant sitting in front of his tent smoking a cigar and anxious to hear the report as to the ex
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 10
ing captured, and the rest driven over the bridge, followed closely by our men. The retreating force was thrown into great confusion, and in the rush a number were crowded off the bridge and drowned. Burnside, on reaching Ox Ford, found it held by the enemy strongly intrenched on the south bank of the river, and no attack was made. Warren reached Jericho Ford soon after noon, seized it, laid a pontoon-bridge, and by 4:30 P. M. had moved his whole corps to the south bank. At six o'clock Hill's corps attacked Warren's line before his troops were all in position, and forced it back some distance; but the enemy was soon repulsed. Wright's corps was moved up to support Warren, but it was not deemed necessary to send it across the river until the next morning. General Grant rode during this day, May 23, with Hancock's corps. While halting in the afternoon at a house not far from the river, he was told by the people living there that Lee had rested for a few hours at the same hou
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 10
cinity of Richmond; and Hoke's brigade of Early's division had also been sent to Lee from the Confederate capital. On the 22d, as soon as Grant had learned the extent of the disaster to Butler's army on the James, he said that Butler was not detaining 10,000 men in Richmond, and not even keeping the roads south of that city broken, and he considered it advisable to have the greater part of Butler's troops join in the campaign of the Army of the Potomac. On May 25 he telegraphed orders to Halleck, saying: Send Butler's forces to White House, to land on the north side, and march up to join this army. The James River should be held to City Point, but leave nothing more than is absolutely necessary to hold it, acting purely on the defensive. The enemy will not undertake any offensive operations there, but will concentrate everything here. At the same time he said: If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and
James H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 10
ld have done under similar circumstances; but he had by this time become familiar with Lee's methods, and had very little apprehension that he would take the offensive. Nevertheless, Hancock was ordered to take every precaution against a possible assault. The withdrawal of the army was conducted with consummate skill, and furnishes an instructive lesson in warfare. In the first place, the enemy had to be deceived and thrown off his guard to make the movement at all safe. For this purpose Wilson's division of cavalry was transferred to the right of the army on May 25, and ordered to cross the North Anna and proceed to Little River on Lee's extreme left, and make a vigorous demonstration, to convey the impression that there was a movement of the army in that direction with a view to turning Lee's left. This was done so effectually that Lee telegraphed to Richmond the next morning: From present indications the enemy seems to contemplate a movement on our left flank. During the nigh
hot they bent in the middle by their own weight; efforts were then made to twist them so as to render them still more unserviceable. Several miles of railway were thus destroyed. The reinforcements which General Grant had predicted would be sent to Lee's army had reached him. Between 12,000 and 15,000 men arrived from the 22d to the 25th of May. Breckinridge had come from the valley of Virginia with nearly all of his forces; Pickett brought a division from the vicinity of Richmond; and Hoke's brigade of Early's division had also been sent to Lee from the Confederate capital. On the 22d, as soon as Grant had learned the extent of the disaster to Butler's army on the James, he said that Butler was not detaining 10,000 men in Richmond, and not even keeping the roads south of that city broken, and he considered it advisable to have the greater part of Butler's troops join in the campaign of the Army of the Potomac. On May 25 he telegraphed orders to Halleck, saying: Send Butler's
R. M. T. Hunter (search for this): chapter 10
r part of Butler's troops join in the campaign of the Army of the Potomac. On May 25 he telegraphed orders to Halleck, saying: Send Butler's forces to White House, to land on the north side, and march up to join this army. The James River should be held to City Point, but leave nothing more than is absolutely necessary to hold it, acting purely on the defensive. The enemy will not undertake any offensive operations there, but will concentrate everything here. At the same time he said: If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canals should be destroyed beyond the possibility of repair for weeks. These instructions were given in consequence of the withdrawal of Breckinridge's command, which left the valley of Virginia undefended. When I recrossed the river and returned to headquarters in the evening, I found General Grant sitting in front of his tent smoking a cigar and anxious to hear the report as t
E. Babcock (search for this): chapter 10
che. About dark General Grant wished me to make another trip to the extreme right, to assist in the work of withdrawing the troops, as I was particularly familiar with that part of the lines. Sickness is no excuse in the field, so I started across the river again without making my condition known to the general. To make matters worse, a thunder-storm came up, accompanied by vivid lightning, and between the flashes the darkness was so impenetrable that it was slow work finding the roads. Babcock, seeing my condition, volunteered to accompany me, so that if I gave out, the orders I was carrying might still reach their destination. We remained in the saddle the greater part of the night. On my return to headquarters a surgeon supplied me liberally with round-shot in the form of quinine pills, which were used so effectively that my fever was soon forced to beat a retreat. As soon as it was dark the other divisions of Wright's corps had begun the recrossing of the river. This co
t of the Fredericksburg Railroad, and to strike Lee wherever he could be found. To understand the er, he was told by the people living there that Lee had rested for a few hours at the same house thut suddenly on May 8, passed round the right of Lee's army, keeping out of reach of his infantry, carles's Mills. That day it became evident that Lee was going to make a permanent stand between the the situation at this time: It now looks as if Lee's position were such that it would not be prudch General Grant had predicted would be sent to Lee's army had reached him. Between 12,000 and 15,0ssent, and she continued: I'm powerful glad General Lee has been lickin‘ you-all from the Rapidan cr solution a very formidable military problem. Lee's position, from the strength and location of hs the North Anna and proceed to Little River on Lee's extreme left, and make a vigorous demonstrat Lee's left. This was done so effectually that Lee telegraphed to Richmond the next morning: From [7 more...]
urns from his raid meeting between Grant and Burnside destroying a Railroad the enemy reinforced Hancock marched to the Telegraph-road bridge, Burnside to Ox Ford, and Warren to Jericho Ford. Wrig were crowded off the bridge and drowned. Burnside, on reaching Ox Ford, found it held by the en night our whole army, except one division of Burnside's corps, was on the south side of the river ahad been considering for some time, assigning Burnside's corps to the Army of the Potomac, and putti to inform Meade of the instructions given to Burnside, and to let Burnside know of the movements thhe headquarters of Burnside the next morning, Burnside came out of his tent, and in company with sev am glad it has been issued. This conduct of Burnside gave the greatest satisfaction to the generalt must be recollected in this connection that Burnside was senior in rank to Meade, and had commandes was also withdrawn and moved in the rear of Burnside, and at daylight the next morning halted in a[5 more...]
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