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Murray Taylor (search for this): chapter 3.29
in gathering the broken and scattered troops that had swept the two miles of battle-field. General Jackson is just ahead on the road, Captain, said Rodes; tell him I will be here at this cabin if I am wanted. I had not gone a hundred yards before I heard firing, a shot or two, and then a company volley upon the right of the road, and another upon the left. A few moments farther on I met Captain Stonewall Jackson going forward on the Plank road in advance of his line of battle. Murray Taylor, an aide of A. P. Hill's, with tidings that Jackson and Hill were wounded, and some around them killed, by the fire of their own men. Spurring my horse into a sweeping gallop, I soon passed the Confederate line of battle, and, some three or four rods on its front, found the general's horse beside a pine sapling on the left, and a rod beyond a little party of men caring for a wounded officer. The story of the sad event is briefly told, and, in essentials, very much as it came to me from
Harvey Black (search for this): chapter 3.29
See map, p. 158.--editors. Again we resorted to the litter, and with difficulty bore it through the bush, and then under a hot fire along the road. Soon an ambulance was reached, and stopping to seek some stimulant at Chancellor's (Dowdall's Tavern), we were found by Dr. McGuire, who at once took charge of the wounded man. Passing back over the battle-field of the afternoon, we reached the Wilderness store, and then, in a field on the north, the field-hospital of our corps under Dr. Harvey Black. Here we found a tent prepared, and after midnight the left arm was amputated near the shoulder, and a ball taken from the right hand. All night long it was mine to watch by the sufferer, and keep him warmly wrapped and undisturbed in his sleep. At 9 A. M., on the next day, when he aroused, cannon firing again filled the air, and all the Sunday through the fierce battle raged, General J. E. B. Stuart commanding the Confederates in Jackson's place. A dispatch was sent to the comman
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 3.29
t the suggestion of Colonel Venable, whom I found stirring, I entered the general's tent and awoke him. Turning his feet out of his cot he sat upon its side as I gave him the tidings from the front. Expressing no surprise, he playfully said: Well, I thought I heard firing, and was beginning to think it was time some of you young fellows were coming to tell me what it was all about. Tell your good general that I am sure he knows what to do. I will meet him at the front very soon. It was Sedgwick who had crossed, and, marching along the river front to impress us with his numbers, was now intrenching his line on the river road, under cover of Federal batteries on the north bank. All day long we lay in the old lines of the action of December preceding, watching the operation of the enemy. Nor did we move through the next day, the 30th of April. During the forenoon of the 29th General Lee had been informed by General J. E. B. Stuart of the movement in force by General Hooker acros
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 3.29
ral J. E. B. Stuart of the movement in force by General Hooker across the Rappahannock upon Chancellorsville; 1st, they reached Anderson's position, confronting Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville, near the Tabernaclroad. To meet the whole Army of the Potomac, under Hooker, General Lee had of all arms about 60,000 men. Genend McLaws had been sent from Fredericksburg to meet Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville; Anderson on Wedness and skirmishers were driven back upon the body of Hooker's force at Chancellorsville. Here we reached a point, a mile and a half from Hooker's lines, where a road turns down to the left toward the old Catherine Furns, never failing until heard at the headquarters of Hooker at Chancellorsville — the wild rebel yell of the lol not move as fast as others. Thus the attack upon Hooker's flank was a grand success, beyond the most sanguiConfederate shells on Sunday, May 3d, shortly after Hooker was injured while standing on the porch. The pictu
through the Valley, Seven Days, and Second Manassas campaigns. At Frederick City, in the Antietam campaign, he bought a soft hat for his general, who, at Fredericksburg, gave him the cap as a souvenir.--editors. sleeping in our tents at corps headquarters, near Hamilton's Crossing, we were aroused by Major Samuel Hale, of Early's staff, with the stirring news that Federal troops were crossing the Rappahannock on pontoons under cover of a heavy fog. General Jackson had spent the night at Mr. Yerby's hospitable mansion near by, where Mrs. Jackson [his second wife] had brought her infant child for the father to see. He was at once informed of the news, and promptly issued to his division commanders orders to prepare for action. At his direction I rode a mile across the fields to army headquarters, and finding General Robert E. Lee still slumbering quietly, at the suggestion of Colonel Venable, whom I found stirring, I entered the general's tent and awoke him. Turning his feet out of
William D. Pender (search for this): chapter 3.29
e Engineers, and Sergeant Cunliffe, of the Signal Corps. Spurring his horse across the road to his right, he was met by a second volley from the right company of Pender's North Carolina brigade. Under this volley, when not two rods from the troops, the general received three balls at the same instant. One penetrated the palm ofthrough clouds and leaves, he opened his eyes and wearily said: Never mind me, Captain, never mind me. Raising him again to his feet, he was accosted by Brigadier-General Pender: Oh, General, I hope you are not seriously wounded. I will have to retire my troops to re-form them, they are so much broken by this fire. But Jackson, rallying his strength, with firm voice said: You must hold your ground, General Pender; you must hold your ground, sir! and so uttered his last command on the field. The New Chancellor House. This picture is from a photograph taken at a reunion of Union and Confederate officers and soldiers in May, 1884. The original hou
Robert E. Rodes (search for this): chapter 3.29
ions, A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's, commanded by Rodes, Trimble's, commanded by Colston, and Early's;on the right. The well-trained skirmishers of Rodes's division, under Major Eugene Blackford, wereatch in his hand. Upon his right sat General Robert E. Rodes, the very picture of a soldier, and e inch all that he appeared. Upon the right of Rodes sat Major Blackford. Are you ready, GeneralGeneral Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward tRodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the lo be no mistake and no failure. And there were Rodes and A. P. Hill. Had they not seen and cheeredin in the field. Turning toward them, I found Rodes and his staff engaged in gathering the broken ckson is just ahead on the road, Captain, said Rodes; tell him I will be here at this cabin if I am[1 more...]
William T. Poague (search for this): chapter 3.29
nt from the preparation of the spring, the troops were in fine condition and in high spirits. The boys were all back from home or sick leave. Old Jack was there upon the road in their midst; there could be no mistake and no failure. And there were Rodes and A. P. Hill. Had they not seen and cheered, as long and as loud as they were permitted, the gay-hearted Stuart and the long-bearded Fitz Lee on his fiery charger? Was not Crutchfield's array of brass and iron dogs of war at hand, with Poague and Palmer, and all the rest, ready to bark loud and deep with half a chance? Alas! for Howard and his unformed lines, and his brigades with guns stacked, and officers at dinner or asleep under the trees, and butchers deep in the blood of beeves! Scattered through field and forest, his men were preparing their evening meal. But see notes, pp. 198 and 202.--editors. A little show of earth-work facing the south was quickly taken by us in reverse from the west. Flying battalions are not
and the Federal force found here and at Talley's, a mile farther west, was the Eleventh Corps, under General Howard. General Fitz Lee, with cavalry scouts, had advanced until he had view of the position of Howard's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewall brigade of Virginia troops, under Brigadier-General Paxton, to hold the point where the German Had they not seen and cheered, as long and as loud as they were permitted, the gay-hearted Stuart and the long-bearded Fitz Lee on his fiery charger? Was not Crutchfield's array of brass and iron dogs of war at hand, with Poague and Palmer, and alrates in Jackson's place. A dispatch was sent to the commanding general to announce formally his disability,--tidings General Lee had received during the night with profound grief. There came back the following note: General: I have just recei
Samuel Hale (search for this): chapter 3.29
ant-General, C. S. A. At daybreak on the morning of the 29th of April, 1863, Stonewall Jackson's cap. Major Jed. Hotchkiss, who owns the old gray cap, writes that Jackson wore it through the Valley, Seven Days, and Second Manassas campaigns. At Frederick City, in the Antietam campaign, he bought a soft hat for his general, who, at Fredericksburg, gave him the cap as a souvenir.--editors. sleeping in our tents at corps headquarters, near Hamilton's Crossing, we were aroused by Major Samuel Hale, of Early's staff, with the stirring news that Federal troops were crossing the Rappahannock on pontoons under cover of a heavy fog. General Jackson had spent the night at Mr. Yerby's hospitable mansion near by, where Mrs. Jackson [his second wife] had brought her infant child for the father to see. He was at once informed of the news, and promptly issued to his division commanders orders to prepare for action. At his direction I rode a mile across the fields to army headquarters, and
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