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Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.85
of Rousseau's line (see map, page 616). In the right of the picture is seen the 4th Michigan Battery. The front line was composed of the 31st and 17th Ohio, and the second line of the 82d Indiana and 38th Ohio. Common prudence and the safety of my army, upon which even the safety of our cause depended, left no doubt on my mind as to the necessity of my withdrawal from so unequal a contest. Bragg acknowledged a loss of over 10,000 men, over 9000 of whom were killed or wounded,--nearly 25 per cent. of the total force engaged. The loss in the Union army was, in killed, 1533; wounded, 7245 = 8778; and in prisoners, McCook, 2092; Thomas, 576; Crittenden, 821,--total, 3489. Apprehending the possible success of a flank movement against his left, General Bragg had caused all the tents and baggage to be loaded on wagons and sent to the rear. On the night of the 3d he began his retreat and continued it south of Elk River, whence he was ordered back to Tullahoma by General Johnston.
Evander McNair (search for this): chapter 7.85
n the right of Davis's division. Leaving the detachments in R. W. Johnson's division to the attention of two of his brigades and Wheeler's cavalry, McCown turned McNair to the right, where Cleburne was already heavily engaged. Driving Davis's skirmishers before him, Cleburne advanced with difficulty in line of battle, bearing to, about seven thousand strong without works of any kind, Hardee hurled the seven brigades commanded by Manigault, Loomis, Polk, Bushrod Johnson,Wood, Liddell, and McNair--10,000 men. The engagement which followed (being the second distinct stage of the battle on the right) was one of the fiercest of the day. Baldwin was the first time formed the right of the extreme Union line of battle, was in the meantime fiercely assailed. In front of Post, the Confederates under McCown, in command of McNair's brigade of his own division, and Liddell of Cleburne's division, received a decided repulse; and Cleburne was for a time equally unsuccessful in pushing back th
Jones M. Withers (search for this): chapter 7.85
Hardee's attack was to be taken up by Polk with the divisions of Cheatham and Withers, in succession to the right flank, the move to be made by a constant wheel to the west, as he advanced to the attack, left an opening between his right and Withers's left, into which Cleburne's division fell, and together the two divisions chn carried out in strict conformity with its requirements. It now remained for Withers and Cheatham to drive the Union center back on the Union left. The retirementeridan's division precipitated the entire command of Cheatham and a portion of Withers's upon Negley's two brigades and two brigades of Rousseau, on the left of the reviously described, and the entire strength of Cheatham and three brigades of Withers and Cleburne having come upon Rousseau, the latter had fallen back into the ope, which up to 10 o'clock had lain concealed in the rifle-pits on tie right of Withers's line, arose at the order, and, under a terrific fire, dashed forward across
Timothy R. Stanley (search for this): chapter 7.85
nson pike, taking them in front, left flank, and rear. The roar of artillery and the sharp rattle of musketry had aroused these brigades early, and they had stood in line, for hours, in momentary expectation of an attack upon their front. This, it is possible, would have been repulsed; but when it came in such a questionable shape, preceded by a cloud of retreating troops, but one course appeared to present itself to the commander, and that was to fall back. Nevertheless, he faced Colonel T. R. Stanley's brigade to the right, and ordered Colonel John F. Miller to hold his position to the last extremity. Miller arranged his brigade in convex order, with Schultz's battery on his right and Ellsworth's battery on his left. Simultaneously with Cheatham's advance upon his right, Stewart's and Anderson's brigades attacked Miller in front. Miller's lines were barely formed when a heavy musketry and artillery fire opened upon his men, who met the charge with a well-directed fire. On his
Jerome B. Robertson (search for this): chapter 7.85
Union infantry was soon ordered to charge. Colonel John F. Miller with his brigade and two regiments of Stanley's was the first to cross the river, on the extreme left. He was quickly followed on the right by Davis and Morton and by Hazen in the center. Beatty quickly re-formed his division and recrossed the river and joined in the pursuit. The artillery ceased firing, and the Union line with loud cheers dashed forward, firing volley after volley upon the fugitives, who rallied behind Robertson's battery and Anderson's brigade in the narrow skirt of timber from which they had emerged to the assault. The Union line advanced and took possession of the ground from which Beatty had been driven an hour before, and both armies bivouacked upon the battlefield. General Spears, with a brigade guarding a much-needed supply train, came up and took position on the right, relieving Rousseau on the following morning. General Bragg had been promptly notified by General Joseph Wheeler of th
Francis L. Guenther (search for this): chapter 7.85
e the cedars in which Negley's division and the regulars of Rousseau's: division were so roughly handled. In the foreground are seen the batteries of Loomis and Guenther. old Army of the Ohio, were the same that only three months before had hurled back the strong fighting brigades of Hardee on the bloody slopes of Chaplin Hills Slemmer, of Fort Pickens fame, was wounded early. Steadily, as if on drill, the trained battalions fired by file, mowing down the advancing Confederate lines. Guenther's battery could not long check the fury of the; charge that bore down upon the flanks and was fast enveloping the entire: command. Lieutenant-Colonel Kell, thham and three brigades of Withers and Cleburne having come upon Rousseau, the latter had fallen back into the open field, where he found Van Cleve. Loomis's and Guenther's batteries, double-shotted with canister, were posted on a ridge, and as the Confederate line advanced, opened upon it with terrific force. Men fell all along
of battle, and, against the remonstrance of General Wood, ordered a forward movement. Palmer united with Wood, however, in a protest on the ground that an advance at night over unknown ground, in theMorton, was posted on Stone's River, in rear of Wood, to prepare fords. Rousseau came up with Scrib, 1700 strong) and to advance on Breckinridge. Wood's division was to cross by brigades at the uppe the high ground east of Stone's River, so that Wood's batteries could enfilade the heavy body of trne of battle for a movement to the right, where Wood was to join him in an assault upon Breckinridgelse. All along the line from Harker's right to Wood's left, the space gradually narrowed between ths upon Bragg's right wing having been arrested, Wood's division was in position to cross at the uppewo brigades of Palmer's division and Hascall of Wood's, filled out by the remains of Sheridan's and ge and presence of mind equal to any emergency; Wood, suffering from a wound in his heel, staid in t[1 more...]
B. F. Scribner (search for this): chapter 7.85
hrough which Cleburne's and McOown's victorious columns were advancing, sweeping everything before; them. On the left the roar of battle in Negley's front showed that all was not lost, and to his right Colonel John Beatty's brigade was formed. Scribner was held in reserve. The shock of battle fell heaviest upon the regulars; over one-third of the command fell either killed or wounded. Major Slemmer, of Fort Pickens fame, was wounded early. Steadily, as if on drill, the trained battalions ficupied a knoll in support of Livingston's battery on the following day. The Confederate line, formed by Polk and Breckinridge on the right and Hardee on the left, extended from the point on Stone's River where Position of Starkweather's and Scribner's brigades on January 1, 2, and 3. from a Lithograph. Chalmers's brigade had bivouacked since the 25th, in a direction almost at right angles with its original line. At dawn on the 1st of January the right flank of General Polk was adva
Adam J. Slemmer (search for this): chapter 7.85
r perfect discipline, was placed on the extreme right. The line was formed in a dense cedar brake, through which Cleburne's and McOown's victorious columns were advancing, sweeping everything before; them. On the left the roar of battle in Negley's front showed that all was not lost, and to his right Colonel John Beatty's brigade was formed. Scribner was held in reserve. The shock of battle fell heaviest upon the regulars; over one-third of the command fell either killed or wounded. Major Slemmer, of Fort Pickens fame, was wounded early. Steadily, as if on drill, the trained battalions fired by file, mowing down the advancing Confederate lines. Guenther's battery could not long check the fury of the; charge that bore down upon the flanks and was fast enveloping the entire: command. Lieutenant-Colonel Kell, the commander of the 2d Ohio, was killed; Colonel Forman, the boy Colonel of the 15th Kentucky, and Major Carpenter, of the 19th Infantry, fell mortally wounded. There wa
George W. Roberts (search for this): chapter 7.85
photograph taken in 1884. supported by Vaughan's. Turner's Confederate battery took position near the brick-kiln [see map, p. 616], and opened fire, under cover of which Manigault made an unsuccessful dash upon Houghtaling's Union battery. Colonel Roberts was killed, and Colonel Bradley, of the 52d Illinois, succeeded to the command of the brigade. Having completed the formation of his line, Hardee gave the order for a general advance, and that portion of the right wing, which up to this timault made upon it, retreated in perfect order toward the left and rear, with empty cartridge-boxes, but with courage undaunted. Schaefer's brigade, being entirely out of ammunition, obeyed Sheridan's order to fix bayonets and await the charge. Roberts's brigade, having a few cartridges left, fell back, resisting the enemy. With the country to the right and rear overrun by McCown's infantry and Wheeler's cavalry in pursuit of R. W. Johnson's routed division, one-half of which were either kill
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