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Samuel C. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 12.92
delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, and grog with them. The conduct of the Alabama's Assistant-Surgeon Llewellyn, son of a British rector, deserves mention. He was unremitting
have justified the Kearsarge in continuing the fire until the Alabama had sunk beneath the waters. Boats were now lowered from the Alabama. Her master's-mate, Fullam, an Englishman, came alongside the Kearsarge with a few of the wounded, reported the disabled and sinking condition of his ship, and asked for assistance. Captain Winslow inquired, Does Captain Semmes surrender his ship? Yes, was the reply. Fullam then solicited permission to return with his boat and crew to assist in rescuing the drowning, pledging his The eleven-inch forward pivot-gun on the Kearsarge, in action. word of honor that when this was done he would come on board and suir places in the boat from his ship's company, secured more prisoners, and afforded equal aid to the distressed. The generosity was abused, as the sequel shows. Fullam pulled to the midst of the drowning, rescued several officers, went to the yacht Deerhound, and cast his boat adrift, leaving a number of men struggling in the wa
David Herbert Llewellyn (search for this): chapter 12.92
sarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, and grog with them. The conduct of the Alabama's Assistant-Surgeon Llewellyn, son of a British rector, deserves mention. He was unremitting in attention to the wounded during battle, and after the surrender superintended their removal to the boats, refusing to leave the ship while one remained. This duty performed, being unable to swim, he attached two empty shell-boxes to his waist as a life-preserver and jumped overboard. Nevertheless, he was unable to keep his head above water. When the Kearsarge was cleared for action every man on the sick-list w
uld have done, as Surgeon-General Browne clearly intimates, was to have steamed up close to the sinking Alabama, and saved her people himself, instead of remaining four hundred yards off. It will be noticed that this statement leaves untouched the question of the right of a prisoner to escape after surrender and before delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and beca
the cry, The Alabama! The drum beat to general quarters; Captain Winslow put aside the prayer-book, seized the trumpet, ordered the ship about, and headed seaward. The ship was cleared for action, with the battery pivoted to starboard. The Alabama approached from the western entrance, escorted by the French iron-clad frigate Couronne, flying the pennant of the commandant of the port, followed in her wake by a small fore-and-aft-rigged steamer, the Deerhound, flying the flag of the Royal Mersey Yacht Club. The commander of the frigate had informed Captain Semmes that his ship would escort him to the limit of the French waters. The frigate, having convoyed the Alabama three marine miles from the coast, put down her helm, and steamed back into port without delay. The steam-yacht continued on, and remained near the scene of action. Captain Winslow had assured the French admiral that in the event of an engagement the position of the ship should be far enough from shore to preve
Jacob Staempfli (search for this): chapter 12.92
er than those inflicted by the Shenandoah. The sum total of the claims filed against the twelve cruisers for ships and cargoes, up to March 15th, 1872, was $19,782,917.60, all but about six millions of it being charged to the account of the Alabama and Shenandoah. On May 8th, 1871, the Treaty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses,
Joseph A. Cooper (search for this): chapter 12.92
nners who had been trained on board the Excellent in Portsmouth harbor. The Blakely rifle was the most effective gun. The Alabama fought bravely until she could no longer fight or float. The contest was decided by the superiority of the 11-inch Dahlgrens, especially the after-pivot, together with the coolness and accuracy of aim of the gunners of the Kearsarge, and notably by the skill of William Smith, the captain of the after-pivot, who in style and behavior was like Long Tom Coffin in Cooper's Pilot. To the disparagement of Captain Winslow it has been said that Lieutenant-Commander Thornton commanded the ship during the action. This is not true. Captain Winslow, standing on the horse-block abreast the mizzen-mast, fought his ship gallantly and, as is shown by the result, with excellent judgment. In an official report he wrote: It would seem almost invidious to particularize the conduct of any one man or officer, in which all had done their duty with a fortitude and co
nded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, and grog with them. The conduct of the Alabama's Assistant-Surgeon Llewellyn, son of a British rector, deserves mention. He was unremitting in attention to the wounded during battle, a
John Lancaster (search for this): chapter 12.92
nslow to run down and assist in picking up the men of the sinking ship. Or, as her owner, Mr. John Lancaster, reported: The fact is, that when we passed the Kearsarge the captain cried out, For God's of the Kearsarge. Apparently aware that the forty persons he had rescued would be claimed, Mr. Lancaster steamed away as fast as he could, direct for Southampton, without waiting for such surgical tunately, however, the steam-yacht Deerhound, owned by a gentleman of Lancashire, England, Mr. John Lancaster, who was himself on board, steamed up in the midst of my drowning men, and rescued a numbent one, and then, tardily, another boat. This imputation of inhumanity is contradicted by Mr. Lancaster's assertion that he was requested to do what he could to save the poor fellows who were struhowever, the interference was directly authorized by Captain Winslow's request, addressed to Mr. Lancaster, and, therefore, the latter committed no breach of neutrality in taking the prisoners on boa
st. I beg she will not depart before I am ready to go out. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, R. Semmes, Captain. This communication was sent by Mr. Bonfils, the Confederate States Commercial Agent, to Mr. Liais, the United States Commercial Agent, with a request that the latter would furnish a copy to Captain Winslow for his guidance. There was no other challenge to combat. The letter that passed between the commercial agents was the challenge about which so much has been said. Captain Semmes informed Captain Winslow through Mr. Bonfils of his intention to fight; Captain Winslow informed Captain Semmes through Mr. Liais that he came to Cherbourg to fight, and had no intention of leaving. He made no other reply. Captain Winslow assembled the officers and discussed the expected battle. It was probable the two ships would engage on parallel lines, and the Alabama would seek neutral waters in event of defeat; hence the necessity of begi
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