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Mystic River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
night-time I should unquestionably have fallen, and been lost in the black slushy depths of the marsh. Columbus is a beautiful little city; but as the letter in which I described it, and my journey to Augusta, was unfortunately lost, and as I am too faithful a chronicler to rely on my memory alone for facts, I will here close my chapter on slavery in North and South Carolina, and devote the remainder of my space to the slaves and the States of Georgia and Alabama. Postscript.-Malden, Massachusetts, Dec. 30.--In my communications to my friends, written on this tour, I strictly confined my observations to the slave population — the colored South. The evidences that I saw daily of the injurious effects of slavery on the soil, trade, customs, social condition and morals of the whites I reserved for editorial use; to advance, from time to time, to such enlightened fellow-citizens as are incapable of seeing or appreciating the self-evident truth that every crime is necessarily a cu
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ma. I walked the entire distance from Atlanta, Georgia to Montgomery, Alabama. As I intend to revisit that country at the earliest opporthe shareholders of the railroad from West Point, Georgia, to Montgomery, Alabama, own all the slaves who are employed in grading, pumping, wo two. The rich slave. When about fifty miles distant from Montgomery, I saw a young man of color, well dressed — rather a dandy, in faish me with the copy desired, and appointed a place of meeting in Montgomery. Alas for the poor fellow! Either I mistook the place of rendto meet me. Other slaves and slave sales. My washerwoman in Montgomery hired her own time also. She paid her owner $200 a year; lived i vengeance and a half? The first things that I saw on entering Montgomery were three large posters, whose captions read respectively thus: Southern women and Northern travellers chiefly. I remained in Montgomery two or three weeks; sailed down the romantic Alabama to Mobile; i
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Higher Law and the old slave Abraham why Northern travellers in the South so often return home with proslavery opinions four reasons property in man is robbery of man slavery a cowardly institution Prejudice of race city, plantation, and hired-out country slaves a black Rothschild why the Southern ladies are pro-slavery a poem by William North, About Southern women and Northern travellers chiefly. I remained in Montgomery two or three weeks; sailed down the romantic Alabama to Mobile; in that place rambled for twenty-four hours; and then entered the steamer for the city of New Orleans. I passed the winter there. For reasons that I have already stated, I did not speak with the slaves on the subject of bondage during the earlier part of my sojourn; and, as I was obliged to leave the city in a hurry — to escape the entangling endearments of the cholera, which already had its hands in my hair before I could reach the Mississippi River--I never had an opportunity of fully
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ntucky and Ohio. No difference of soil, no diversity of climate, no diversity in the original settlement of those two States can account for the remarkable disproportion in their natural advancement. Separated by a river alone, they seem to have been purposely and providentially designed to exhibit in their future histories, the difference which naturally results from a country free, and a country afflicted with the curse of slavery. The same may be said of the two States of Missouri and Illinois. Surely this is satisfactory testimony? Thomas J. Randolph spoke next, and in the same strain as the preceding speakers. Is slavery a curse? Marshall, Barry, Randolph, Faulkner, and Chandler answer in the affirmative; and thus replies Mr. James McDowell, junior, the delegate from Rockbridge: Slavery a Leprosy. Sir, if our ancestors had exerted the firmness, which, under greater obligations we ourselves are called on to exert, Virginia would not, at this day, have been mou
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
My second trip. I. Virginia. Preliminary words on insurrection I start again Chesterfield county facts social reunions North and South the poor whites and slavery education and slavery a know-nothing yet wise negro boy farming Utensils guano and negroes the Slaveocracy and the poor, Preliminary words on urg. I made no notes of the intervening country at the time, but will insert here what I wrote on a subsequent pedestrian journey over the same route. Chesterfield county facts. Nearly the entire road runs through woods. Land, from $6 to $8 an acre. This county, a few years ago, had a population of 17,483, an increase ual circle, a bee, a surprise party, a social --or at any other of the innumerable reunions which are everywhere so uncommonly common in the Free States? Chesterfield county, by the latest census, had five hundred and sixty-four farms; 87,180 acres improved, and 108,933 unimproved acres: the total value of which, with improvemen
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
their future histories, the difference which naturally results from a country free, and a country afflicted with the curse of slavery. The same may be said of the two States of Missouri and Illinois. Surely this is satisfactory testimony? Thomas J. Randolph spoke next, and in the same strain as the preceding speakers. Is slavery a curse? Marshall, Barry, Randolph, Faulkner, and Chandler answer in the affirmative; and thus replies Mr. James McDowell, junior, the delegate from Rockbridge: Slavery a Leprosy. Sir, if our ancestors had exerted the firmness, which, under greater obligations we ourselves are called on to exert, Virginia would not, at this day, have been mourning over the legacy of weakness, and of sorrow that has been left her; she would not have been thrust down — down — in a still lowering relation to the subordinate post which she occupies in the Confederacy, whose career she has led; she would not be withering under the leprosy which is piercing her t
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
mes of the authors, printers, publishers, and the amazingly clumsy appearance of it, prove. These speeches were delivered in the House of Delegates of Virginia, in 1832, by the leading politicians of the State, shortly after the celebrated insurrection, or massacre (as the slaveholders style it) of Southampton — a period of intense excitement, when abolition was the order of the day, even in the stony-hearted Old Dominion. Is slavery a curse? Listen to the answer of Thomas Marshall, of Fauquier, then, as yet, one of the distinguished politicians of Virginia: Thomas Marshall's opinion. Slavery is ruinous to the whites; it retards improvement; roots out our industrious population; banishes the yeomanry of the country; deprives the spinner, the weaver, the smith, the shoemaker, the carpenter of employment and support. The evil admits of no remedy. It is increasing, and will continue to increase, until the whole country will be inundated by one black wave, covering its whol
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nd there entertained the sinful desire that some person of profane habits were present, as I would willingly have given him half of my cash to have done a little swearing on my private account — a mode of relief which my habits and taste would not permit me to indulge in. I suppose this sentence shocks you very much; but judge me not until you have attempted the same dreary journey that I successfully accomplished! Probably you will swear — and not by proxy. I walked nearly or quite to Manchester, and then, changing my mind, took the branch to Columbus, the capital of South Carolina, I walked from there to Augusta--sixty miles. I kept no notes during this trip; but in a letter written shortly after my arrival in Augusta, I have preserved and recorded the antislavery results of it. I was ten days on the trip, I find; but whether ten days to Columbus, or ten days from Wilmington to Augusta, I cannot now recall. I walked from Columbus to Augusta in two days: that I remember — for <
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ry servitude. Their discontent is passive only. They neither hope, nor grumble, nor threaten. I never advised a single slave either in Georgia or Alabama to run away. It is too great a responsibility to incur. The distance is too far; the opportunities and the chances of escape too few. The slaves, I found, regard themselves as the victims of a system of injustice from which the only earthly hope of escape is--the grave! Railroad hands. The shareholders of the railroad from West Point, Georgia, to Montgomery, Alabama, own all the slaves who are employed in grading, pumping, wood cutting, engine firing, and in other necessary labors along the line. These men are the most favored sons of Africa employed in the country, in the States of Alabama or Georgia. They are hard worked from sun to sun, and from Christmas to Christmas, but they are well fed and clothed, and comfortably lodged — comfortably, that is, for negro slaves. Their allowance. They receive five pounds of
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
lave with whom I conversed in Virginia and North Carolina. To each of them I made the same reply. na, and even in some parts of Virginia and North Carolina, if you enter into a conversation with a cnd patriotic sentiments on record! V. North Carolina. Weldon, North Carolina, is a hamlet, os. Hence I found, on my previous visit to North Carolina, that the slave-holders were warm advocatewalk to Augusta the road discontentment North Carolina could be made a Free State railroad handsates. North Carolina a Free State. North Carolina, nolens volens, could be made a member of ts, I will here close my chapter on slavery in North and South Carolina, and devote the remainder ors, or rather plantation lease-holders, of North Carolina, are principally supplied with their handses in the pineries and on the railroads of North Carolina never see theirs. Country slaves, as a ne, I repeated it aloud in the pineries of North Carolina, and the cotton and rice fields of Georgia[3 more...]
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