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Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
excuse me for declining now; but I am at all times ready to serve the public and private interests of the country when called on. Your most obedient servant, J. W. Patterson. A slave girl's Revenge. Conceal or deny it as they may, the slaveholders must feel the truth of Mr. McDowell's declaration, that slavery and danger are inseparable. Such evidences as this paragraph gives, are too serious to be sneered at or overlooked: Nancy, slave of Mr. Seth Marsh, has been arrested in Norfolk for attempting to poison the family of Mrs. Reid, milliner, residing on Church street, by whom she was hired. It was shown that oxalic acid had been mixed in with some food which the girl had been cooking for the family. There are evidences, also, in every paper I pick up, of the beneficial effect of Northern free emigration. Wherever the free colonists settle, up goes the price of land forthwith. Here is an illustration: Rise of real estate. Mr. Seth Halsey, a few days since, s
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 6
er to cut it off than be plagued with it. Several persons around me expressed the opinion that she had done it willfully, to spite her master or mistress, or to keep her from being sold down South. I do not doubt it. A heroic act of this kind was once publicly performed, many years ago, in the city of St. Louis. It was witnessed by gentlemen still living there, one of whom — now an ardent Emancipationist — narrated the circumstance to me. These scenes occurred, not in Russia or Austria, or in avowedly despotic countries, but in the United States of America, which we are so fond of eulogizing as the chosen land of liberty! Liberty! Oh Liberty! what outrages are committed in thy name! These verses, penned in Richmond after a slave sale, by a personal friend of the present writer, although bitter, sectional, and fanatical, when viewed from a conservative position, more faithfully and graphically than any poetry that I have ever read, express the feelings of a man
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ity of Boston. But in every other respect, I believe that all Boston — I even venture to say New England--cannot match it or approach it. The window that looks into the balustrade has evidently bg all classes here. I asked him whether, if Northern people were to settle here — from the New England States--they would be likely to be annoyed on account of their sectional birth? He said that numbers of New England people were settled here; and, as they were sound on the slavery question, or quiet, they were not disturbed. If Northerners were sensitive, he thought that they would oftely, having never studied Heaven's first law himself — only seen it in successful operation in New England households. How many acres have you? Two hundred and fifty-three. How much do you as can be, at so great a distance from the old folks to hum and the mellifluous nasal melody of New England pronunciation. Richmond, May 23.--Warrenton is a pleasant little village, situated in the<
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ing on a rail, Lynching an Abolitionist. before proceeding on my third trip to the sea<*> board slave States, let me narrate one scene that I witnessed in the Far West: On the 18th of October, 1855, I was at Parkville, Missouri. It is one of the little towns on the Missouri River, and acquired some celebrity during the troubles in Kansas. It is built on rugged and very hilly ground, as almost all the towns on this unstable river are. It was founded by Colonel Park, a citizen of Illinois, twenty years, or more, before my visit to it. A mild, kind, hospitable, law-abiding man: one would naturally think that he — the founder of the town, the richest of its citizens, and a slaveholder, albeit, who had never once uttered an abolition sentiment — would not only have escaped the enmity, but even the suspicion, of the border ruffians of the State. But he did not escape. He owned the press and office of the Parkville Luminary, a paper which supported the party, or the wing of the
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
a little labor, it might be heavy with tobacco or the cereal grains. There is a great field open here for Northern intelligence and Northern industry. Vi. Richmond. Richmond Christian advertisements a sign of the times the slave auction room the auctioneer a boy sold been examining her how niggers has riz Jones and Slater a mother on the Block a young Spartan maiden a curse on Virginia, Richmond, May 24.--Charleston excepted, and also, perhaps, Montgomery in Alabama, Romehilled Richmond is the most charming in situation or in outside aspect, of all the Southern cities that I have ever visited. It is a city of over 20,000 inhabitants — the political, commercial, and social metropolis of the State--well laid out, beautifully shaded, studded with little gardens — has several factories, good hotels, a multiplicity of churches, a theatre, five daily papers, a great number of aristocratic streets, with large, fashionable, but not sumptuous residences; and
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
H. Chew, sold, on Thursday last, part of the personal estate belonging to the deceased, consisting of several servants. The sales were as follows: One woman and two small girls sold for $1,450, and were purchased by E. G. W. Hall, Esq. Boy, about 15 years of age, sold for $915, and was purchased by Wm. Z. Beall, Esq. Small boy sold for $700, and was purchased by Daniel C. Digges, Esq. Girl, about 14 years of age, sold for $900, and was purchased by John F. Pickrell, Esq., of Baltimore. Two small girls sold, one for $880, and the other for $550, and were purchased by Mrs. A. H. Chew. My room. Tired with the bar-room and the county papers, I asked to be conducted to my room. It is one of a series of ten, contained in the upper part of a wing, one room deep, the lower or ground part of which is either the cooking establishment or the negroes' quarters. It runs into a spacious yard, and my window commands an exhilarating view of the stables and out-houses. No.
Leesburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was at home; the old man was in town with the produce of his fields. I asked her how many acres there were in her farm, and whether she would sell it? She said there were fifty-nine acres, of light sandy soil; that they cultivated sweet potatoes and market produce, almost exclusively. She didn't believe her old man would sell it; certainly not less than $100 an acre. Land had risen in value very much indeed within the last few years. Her brother William, however, had a farm on the Leesburg road, that he wanted to sell--Well, he war n't in any hurry about it, either, but she reckoned he mowt come to terms with me — it were a first-rate farm, too, and she believed it would just suit me. How many hands do you employ to keep your farm in order? Well, my husband, he keeps four hands besides himself; he's in town a good deal, but we employ three niggers and a white foreman, all the time on the farm. And you keep a woman to assist you? Yes. What do you pay for your ne
Prince Georges (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rl had been cooking for the family. There are evidences, also, in every paper I pick up, of the beneficial effect of Northern free emigration. Wherever the free colonists settle, up goes the price of land forthwith. Here is an illustration: Rise of real estate. Mr. Seth Halsey, a few days since, sold his farm of 600 acres near Lynchbury, Va., to Mr. Barksdale, of Halifax, for $45 per acre. He purchased it several years ago of S. M. Scott, for $27 per acre. In the county of Prince George, land, it appears, is equally valuable. The Planter's Advocate notices the sale of a farm in Bladensburg District, consisting of one hundred and ninety-one acres of unimproved land, for $3,247--seventeen dollars per acre. Another farm, near Patuxent City, Charles County, near the dividing line, was sold for $8,000; another still, in the same neighborhood, for $41 per acre. The Advocate contains another paragraph, which I cheerfully subjoin, as illustrative of the happy effects o
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
and Theologism a Free colored farmer ignorance of people negro driving of horses in H el! need of white labor Charlottesville, Prince William county. Warrenton, Fauquier county, May, 18,--I have walked, to-day, across Prince William cou for a wolf in lamb's clothing — in other words, for a pro-slavery divine — I got out at Gordonstown, and went on to Charlottesville; instead, as I intended, of going to Richmond, by the nearest route and in the quickest time. Charlottesville. Charlottesville. An accident detained me at Charlottesville two days. It is situated in a charming valley — fertile, wooded, watered well — with cultivated bills rising from the plain, and snow-capped misty mountains in the western background. The village, too, isCharlottesville two days. It is situated in a charming valley — fertile, wooded, watered well — with cultivated bills rising from the plain, and snow-capped misty mountains in the western background. The village, too, is the prettiest, it is said, and one of the most thriving in Virginia. The College founded by Jefferson is situated there. It rained almost incessantly all the time I was there. The soil is exclusively a red stiff clay, which, when the rain s
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
My third trip. I. Missouri. Lynching an Abolitionist Parkville Col. Park the mob in Court the victim evidence Ruffiau Law Pleas different modes of punishment proposed the Lynching done Riding on a rail, Lynching an Abolitionist. before proceeding on my third trip to the sea<*> board slave States, let river by a mob of pro-slavery ruffians. Col. Park also got notice to leave, and was compelled to fly for his life. I went over to Parkville from Kansas city, Missouri, to attend to some business there. I had previously made the acquaintance of several of its ruffian citizens. I rode into the town about one o'clock. After arming with his glorious theme, as much property to us as so many dollars and cents — it was our dollars and cents in fact — and so recognized by the statutes of Missouri and the Constitution of the United States. Evidence had been obtained against the prisoner, he added, after this eloquent and learned exordium, from negroes, wh
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