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Gosport (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of my intention to abandon Yorktown and the Warwick, before the fire of that artillery should be opened upon our troops. The suggestion made in the conference in the President's office was also repeated: to form a powerful army near Richmond, of all the available forces of the Confederacy, to fall upon McClellan's army when it should come within reach. Major. General Huger was instructed, at the same time, to prepare to evacuate Norfolk, and Captain S. S. Lee, commanding the navy-yard at Gosport, to remove to a place of safety as much of the valuable property it contained as he could. On Saturday, the 3d of May, the army was ordered to fall back, on information that the Federal batteries would be ready for service in a day or two; Longstreet's and Magruder's divisions by the Warwick road, through Williamsburg, and G. W. Smith's and D. H. Hill's by that from Yorktown-the movement to begin at midnight, and the rear-guard, of cavalry, to follow at daybreak. Information of this wa
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
n's division, of twelve thousand men, was kept on board of transports, in readiness to move up York River. Magruder's division formed the Confederate right wing, Longstreet's the centre, D. H. Hill's t that the enemy was pursuing the course predicted, and preparing to demolish our batteries on York River. The greater range of his guns would have enabled him to do it without exposure, and at the s engaged on this occasion greatly strengthened my suspicion that the army itself was moving up York River in transports. We fought for no other purpose than to hold the ground long enough to enablurg; Smith's and Magruder's divisions were stationary; Colonel Fitzhugh Lee, who was observing York River with his regiment of cavalry, reported a Federal fleet of vessels-of-war and transports, passites troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Sm
New Kent (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Brigadier-General D. R. Jones, was ordered to move on in the afternoon, by the New Kent road, and to turn off at the Burnt Ordinary, toward the Diascund Bridge; to be followed, at two o'clock next morning, by G. W. Smith's, which was to keep the New Kent road. The baggage was to move next, in rear of which D. H. Hill's and Longstreet's divisions were to march. This order of march was based on the idea that a part of the Federal army might pass us by the river. About four o'clock P. M., the cavham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our march required that he should be dislodged, and General Smith was intrusted with this service. He performed it very handsomely with Hampton's and Hood's brigades, under Whiting, driving the enemy,
Cross Keys (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
enemy until the 26th of June, because he was employed, from the 1st until then, in forming a great army, by bringing, to that which I had commanded, fifteen thousand General Holmes told me in General Lee's presence, just before the fight began on the 31st, that he had that force ready to join me when the President should give the order. I have also the written testimony of Colonel Archer Anderson, then of General Holmes's staff, that he brought that number into General Lee's army. men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, which the victories of Cross Keys and Port Republic had rendered disposable.
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
7th. The arrival of Smith's and Longstreet's divisions increased the army on the Peninsula to about fifty-three thousand men, including three thousand sick. It was opposed to a hundred and thirty-three thousand Federal soldiers. Franklin's division, of twelve thousand men, was kept on board of transports, in readiness to move up York River. Magruder's division formed the Confederate right wing, Longstreet's the centre, D. H. Hill's the left, and Smith's the reserve. The fieldworks at Gloucester Point and Yorktown, on the left flank, and Mulberry Point, on the right, were occupied by eight thousand men. In this position we had nothing to do but to finish the works begun, between Yorktown and the head of the inundations, and observe the enemy's operations. They were limited to a little skirmishing at long range, and daily cannonading, generally directed at Magruder's left, or Longstreet's right, and the construction of a long line of batteries in front of Yorktown, and beyond th
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
also repeated: to form a powerful army near Richmond, of all the available forces of the Confederacy, to fall upon McClellan's army when it should come within reach. Major. General Huger was instructed, at the same time, to prepare to evacuate Norfolk, and Captain S. S. Lee, commanding the navy-yard at Gosport, to remove to a place of safety as much of the valuable property it contained as he could. On Saturday, the 3d of May, the army was ordered to fall back, on information that the Fedeen General Longstreet and myself for several hours. Although the condition of the ground and little streams had delayed the troops in their movements, those of Smith and Longstreet were in position quite early enough. But the soldiers from Norfolk, who had seen garrison service only, and were unaccustomed to the incidents of a campaign, were unnecessarily stopped in their march by a swollen rivulet, which, unfortunately, flowed between them and their destination. After waiting in vain
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
d. The four divisions were assembled at Williamsburg about noon of the 4th. Magruder's division marched several miles, was ordered back to Williamsburg, and I returned myself; for at ten o'clock,aced in hospitals and private residences in Williamsburg. Longstreet's and Hill's divisions slept obably passed the winter, had been hauled to Williamsburg that morning, by Major Barbour's orders. Astreet and D. H. Hill, with the cavalry, at Williamsburg, as has been said. In Federal dispatcheon at the Burnt Ordinary, twelve miles from Williamsburg; Smith's and Magruder's divisions were stats division in the centre, formed across the Williamsburg road; Longstreet's on the right, covering td Hill's division in two lines crossing the Williamsburg road at right angles, and to advance to theere fresh, not having fired a shot. On the Williamsburg road four Federal divisions, three of whiches — the commanders at Fair Oaks and on the Williamsburg road-stood on the defensive the day after t[10 more...]
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
neral J. R. Anderson, with nine thousand men, in observation of General McDowell, who was at Fredericksburg with forty-two thousand men; Brigadier-General Branch, with four or five thousand, at Gordonon to the west by the Federal right made me apprehend the separation of the detachments near Fredericksburg and Gordonsville, from the army, and induced me to order them to fall back and unite where the Fredericksburg road crosses the Chickahominy. Near Hanover Court-House, on the 27th, Branch's brigade was attacked by Porter's corps, and suffered severely in the encounter. It was united with Anl A. P. Hill, just promoted, was assigned. In the afternoon a party of cavalry left near Fredericksburg by General Anderson, to observe McDowell's movements, reported that his troops were marchiny observing McDowell's corps, reported that the troops that had been marching southward from Fredericksburg had returned. This indicated, of course, that the intention of uniting the two Federal armi
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nds of rain-water, in many places more than knee-deep, through which they had to struggle. The loss in Longstreet's and Hill's divisions was about three thousand; Longstreet's report. General McClellan adds Hill's loss, twenty-five hundred, to the sum, of which it already made five-sixths, thus counting it twice-making the total six thousand seven hundred and thirty-three, instead of four thousand two hundred and thirty-three. among the killed were Colonels Lomax, Jones, and Moore, of Alabama. About five-sixths of the loss was in the latter division, upon which the weight of the fighting on the right fell. The officers of those troops, who followed the enemy over all the ground on which they fought, and saw the dead and wounded of both parties on the field, were confident that the Federal loss was more than three times as great as ours. It was published in Northern papers as from ten to twelve thousand. General Smith reported a loss of twelve hundred and thirty-three in h
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
y; Colonel Fitzhugh Lee, who was observing York River with his regiment of cavalry, reported a Federal fleet of vessels-of-war and transports, passing up toward West Point. In the evening Major-General Smith sent me intelligence, to the Burnt Ordinary, that a large body of United States troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our march required that he should be dislodged, anhe Confederate battery at Drury's Bluff, suggested the necessity of being ready to meet an advance upon Richmond up the river, as well as from the direction of West Point. The Confederate forces were, in consequence, ordered to cross the Chickahominy on the 15th. And Colonel Goode Bryan, with his regiment of Georgia riflemen, w
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