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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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John Esten Cooke (search for this): chapter 3.21
statement of facts, which I have no doubt will readily recur to you, I beg to call your attention to an entirely different version of this affair given by Major John Esten Cooke in his life of General R. E. Lee, pages 397 and 398, in which he gives the credit to troops from another State. Now, as you were an eye-witness of whatble.University of Virginia, November 24th, 1871. To General N. H. Harris: My Dear General — Your letter of August 24th was duly received. I sought a copy of Major Cooke's life of General Lee and read therein the myth concerning the battle scene of May 12th, 1864, at Spotsylvania Courthouse. Major Cooke has evidently confounded Major Cooke has evidently confounded (in a distorted way) some incidents of the fight on a portion of Rodes' front on the afternoon of the 10th of May, when Gordon and others urged General Lee to retire from the front, with the great battle of May 12th. You do right not to permit so gross a misstatement of facts, which robs the brave Mississippians whom you commanded
he would go back, The men responded with a hearty we will! The brigade moved forward to the point of attack, drove the enemy from the captured works and held the position until 4 A. M. of the 13th, resisting effectually the repeated efforts of Grant's massed forces to dislodge them. With this statement of facts, which I have no doubt will readily recur to you, I beg to call your attention to an entirely different version of this affair given by Major John Esten Cooke in his life of Generadon's supervision, while the battle was raging a short distance in rear of the old line. The enemy abandoned the captured salient on the same day as useless to them, or perhaps as a ruse preparatory to a grand assault on our left, ordered by General Grant at daylight on the 14th (this we learned from captured copies of his battle orders). His troops, however, failed to come up to the attack. The day of the salient, which began in disaster to us, did not close without many shattering blows t
ying the position you did upon the staff of General Lee, I feel that I am warranted in calling uponincidents of the twelfth of May, connecting General Lee with your brigade in the bloody battle of tThe men shouted their promise with a will. General Lee then gave me orders to guide the brigade to in grandeur above those two occasions when General Lee went into the charge with the Texans at theition. The danger, however, was great, and General Lee sent his trusted Adjutant, Colonel W. H. Tare line, as it rushed on, the cry, Go back, General Lee I go back! Some historians like to put thif Fort Harrison), turning his horse towards General Lee, remonstrated with him. Just then I called not repeat the details here. Suffice it to say Lee yielded to his brave men, accepting their promies as follows: The homely simplicity of General Lee in these scenes of the 6th and 12th of May,e it has been by various writers of the life of Lee confounded with the other two incidents of a li[16 more...]
William Mahone (search for this): chapter 3.21
ttle at the salient. The enemy, in attempting to press their advantage, massed their troops and made repeated assaults with overwhelming odds on the troops sent to oppose their further progress within our lines. Rodes sent from time to time urgent messages for more troops. Brigade after brigade was ordered to his assistance as they could be spared from other portions of the line. On the receipt of one of these messages from Rodes, General Lee sent me to our extreme right, occupied by General Mahone, to bring up your brigade. You moved rapidly across the open space in rear of the Court-house. When we had reached a point on tile Courthouse road, near General Lee's position on the line, the brigade was halted for a few minutes. General Lee rode up alone during this halt, and gave orders that you should move on at once to General Rodes' assistance; and, as the column moved on, he rode at your side at its head. We soon came under the fire of the enemy's artillery. This excited Gene
C. M. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 3.21
emand. It was unfortunate that any of these troops should have become aware they were to be relieved by Longstreet. It is certain that owing to this impression, Wilcox's division, on the right, was not in condition to receive Hancock's attack at early dawn on the morning of the 6th, by which they were driven back in considerable confusion. In fact some of the brigades of Wilcox's division came back in disorder, but sullenly and without panic, entirely across the Plank road, where General Lee and the gallant Hill in person helped to rally them. The assertion, made by several writers, that Hill's troops were driven back a mile and a half, is a most seriothat the incident of Lee's charge with Gregg's Texas brigade occurred. The Texans cheered lustily as their line of battle, coming up in splendid style, passed by Wilcox's disordered columns, and swept across our artillery pit and its adjacent breast-work. Much moved by the greeting of these brave men and their magnificent behavi
Cicero W. Harris (search for this): chapter 3.21
General Lee to the rear --the incident with Harris' Mississippi brigade. We take great pleasure in publishing the following detailed account of the incident which occurred with Harris' gallant Mississippians on the 12th of May, 1864, and to which we briefly alluded in our paper in the January number as being (alike with the scene with the Texans in the Wilderness, and that with Gordon's division at Spotsylvania) well authenticated : Letter from General N. H. Harris.Vicksburg, AuguHarris' gallant Mississippians on the 12th of May, 1864, and to which we briefly alluded in our paper in the January number as being (alike with the scene with the Texans in the Wilderness, and that with Gordon's division at Spotsylvania) well authenticated : Letter from General N. H. Harris.Vicksburg, August 24th, 1871. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.: Dear Sir — I am about to trespass upon your kind attention in a matter which may seem at first entirely personal, but the contrary will appear to you after a full and complete statement of my object and wishes. You will recollect, Colonel, that on the morning of the 12th of May, 1864, my brigade (Mississippi), having double-quicked from the left of our lines, was halted on the Court-house road, near Spot
General Lee to the rear --the incident with Harris' Mississippi brigade. We take great pleasure in publishing the following detailed account of the incident which occurred with Harris' gallantrt-house road, near Spotsylvania Courthouse; that, after a halt at this point of a half hour, General Lee in person ordered the brigade (I being at the right of the brigade) to an attention, put it o fire from the batteries of the enemy in front and to our right; that, whilst thus advancing, General Lee, yourself, myself and staff at the head of the brigade, a twelve pound (ricochet) shot passed just in front of General Lee, so near as to excite his horse very much, causing him to rear and plunge in such a manner as would have unseated a less accomplished horseman. The men, seeing the na and one or two of them caught hold of the bridle of his horse and turned the animal around. General Lee then spoke to the men and told them that if they would drive the enemy from the captured work
P. M. Gregg (search for this): chapter 3.21
ve upon me to see that justice is done them in the premises. Almost a similar scene occurred on the 6th of May, 1864, in the Wilderness, between General Lee and Gregg's Texas brigade, and with a great many that has been confounded with the incident at Spotsylvania. I trust, Colonel, if not demanding too great a concession of road, where General Lee was giving directions and assisting General Hill in rallying and reforming his troops. It was here that the incident of Lee's charge with Gregg's Texas brigade occurred. The Texans cheered lustily as their line of battle, coming up in splendid style, passed by Wilcox's disordered columns, and swept acrosshis in less homely words; but the brave Texans did not pick their phrases. We won't go on unless you go back! A sergeant seized his bridle rein. The gallant General Gregg (who laid down his life on the 9th October, almost in General Lee's presence, in a desperate charge of his brigade on the enemy's lines in the rear of Fort Har
he night before. The scene with Gordon's division. Gordon soon arranged the left of his division to make an effort to recapture the lines by driving the enemy back with his right. As he was about to move forward with his Georgia and Virginia brigades in the charge, General Lee, who had reached the front a few minutes before, rode up and joined him. Seeing that Lee was about to ride with him in the charge, the scene of the 6th of May was repeated. Gordon pointed to his Georgians and Virginians, who had never failed him, and urged him to go to the rear. This incident has passed into history, and I will not repeat the details here. Suffice it to say Lee yielded to his brave men, accepting their promise to drive the enemy back. Gordon, carrying the colors, led them forward in a headlong, resistless charge, which carried every thing before it, recapturing the trenches on the right of the salient, and a portion of those on the left, recovering some of the lost guns and leaving the
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 3.21
would go back, The men responded with a hearty we will! The brigade moved forward to the point of attack, drove the enemy from the captured works and held the position until 4 A. M. of the 13th, resisting effectually the repeated efforts of Grant's massed forces to dislodge them. With this statement of facts, which I have no doubt will readily recur to you, I beg to call your attention to an entirely different version of this affair given by Major John Esten Cooke in his life of General R. E. Lee, pages 397 and 398, in which he gives the credit to troops from another State. Now, as you were an eye-witness of what did take place, and personally knew what troops were thus engaged, and occupying the position you did upon the staff of General Lee, I feel that I am warranted in calling upon you for a correction of what may become an error of history. Publications of this kind, often made upon newspaper reports and rumors not always reliable, work a grave injustice. I have no
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