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enant Tompkins says: It will be observed, that he was in command of a detachment of Company B, Second Cavalry, consisting of fifty men, with Second Lieutenant David S. Gordon's Second Dragoons temporially attached. He subsequently adds: Captains Cary, Fearing and Adjutant Frank, of the Fifth New York State Militia, accompanied the command as volunteers. General McDowell says: It appears that Company B, Second Cavalry, commanded by Lieutenant Tompkins, (aggregate about seventy-five). General Bonham, after an examination of the three prisoners taken, reports, the enemy was eighty to eighty-five strong. Colonel Ewell in his official report says: Three prisoners were brought in, who separately reported their strength at eighty, rank and file. And two of the prisoners taken by the enemy, intelligent men, with whom I have communicated, think the enemy's force must have been from seventy-five to one hundred men. All this testimony with what I saw, satisfied me that Lieutenant Tompkins
. Hurrying to the quarters of the Warrenton Rifles, I found about forty or forty-five of them, a short distance this side of their quarters, standing in the clover lot before referred to and resting on the fence which enclosed it, and without an officer. I promptly addressed them, Boys, where is your Captain? They answered, We do not know, sir. Where is your Lieutenant (meaning Shackleford)? The answer was the same. (It is due that I should say that both the Lieutenants, Shackleford and McGee were absent on leaves with their families). Knowing that the men did not look to the other officers to command, I said to them, Boys, you know me, follow me. Without hesitation, they jumped the the fence, and at the corner of the court-house lot on the sidewalk leading from the church to the hotel, I, without the slightest knowledge of tactics, commenced to form them into two files. I had nearly completed my work, when hearing a disturbance at the head of the column, I walked rapidly up th
David S. Gordon (search for this): chapter 7.64
ve the honor to report, pursuant to verbal instructions received from the Colonel-Commanding, that I left this camp on the evening of 31st of May in command of a detachment of Company B, Second Cavalry, consisting of fifty men, with second Lieutenant David S. Gordon, Second Dragoons, temporarily attached for the purpose of reconnoitering the country in the vicinity of Fairfax Courthouse. Upon approaching the town the picket guard was surprised and captured. Several documents were found upon teen finally repulsed, by little more than half his number of Captain Marr's rifles. Lieutenant Tompkins says: It will be observed, that he was in command of a detachment of Company B, Second Cavalry, consisting of fifty men, with Second Lieutenant David S. Gordon's Second Dragoons temporially attached. He subsequently adds: Captains Cary, Fearing and Adjutant Frank, of the Fifth New York State Militia, accompanied the command as volunteers. General McDowell says: It appears that Company
cavalry companies of Harrison and Wickham, camped at Fairfax Station, three miles from the court-house. Captain Thornton, I was informed, went on this duty. Neither man, nor beast, that I could ascertain, sustained the slightest injury in this collision. Having been left to my own discretion, and perfectly satisfied that my position was untenable against any mounted force of dash and courage, I followed immediately on the retiring footsteps of the enemy. It was not until I had reached Cooper's wagon shop, ascertained by recent measurement to be one hundred and ninety-five steps west from the court-house, that I found a place which satisfied my judgment. Here I found a new post and rail fence, on each side of the turn-pike — the one on the south side, helping to enclose the wagon shop yard. Feeling safe in this position, I at once divided my command, placing it on opposite sides of the road, and protecting it by the post and rail fence. I stated to the men, if I was not much m
R. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 7.64
ived that day (the 31st), and had not seen Colonel Ewell, nor been seen by him, he being out on a shem, and after a gratifying interview with Colonel Ewell (whom I knew well, but had not seen for mahe cavalry companies were badly armed, and Colonel Ewell, in his official account of the affairs wh they found several hundred men stationed--Captain Ewell, late of the United States Dragoons, said d been fired at him; on the contrary, Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell speaking of the alarm, says: This washis return. It was during this march that Colonel Ewell told me how he came to be in his then condwell's porch below Gunnell's, and accounts for Ewell's tardiness in reaching The Rifles. He then sr occupied a very short time, during which Colonel Ewell was engaged in getting his courier, and prthat our cavalry, for the reason stated by Colonel Ewell, I suppose, took no part in the affair --tof Captains Harrison and Wickham, for whom Colonel Ewell had sent, and they did not arrive until so[14 more...]
William Lee Davidson (search for this): chapter 7.64
ollow me. Without hesitation, they jumped the the fence, and at the corner of the court-house lot on the sidewalk leading from the church to the hotel, I, without the slightest knowledge of tactics, commenced to form them into two files. I had nearly completed my work, when hearing a disturbance at the head of the column, I walked rapidly up the line to hear what was the matter. Nearing the head of the column, I heard Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell, in his impetuous way, say to one of the men (Davidson), What, sir, do you dispute my authority? To which the young man, in a very proper manner replied, I do sir, until I know you have a right to exercise it. Taking in the situation, and aware that The Rifles and this officer were strangers to each other, I at once said, Men, this is Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell, your commanding officer, a gallant soldier, in whom you may place every confidence. Of course this ended the trouble. The men might well be excused for doubting Colonel Ewell, for whe
thence to Fairfax station. I mention these facts with more particularity, as it will assist the reader to understand what follows. I proceed now to add, for the same purpose, that Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell's quarters were at the hotel; that Captain Thornton's company of cavalry, of about sixty men, were on the same side of the street with the hotel, the horses in the stable of the hotel, and the men in a church a short distance further west. Captain Green's cavalry company, also about sixty st entered the turn-pike, (for I saw no more of him afterwards,) that Colonel Ewell left the command to dispatch a courier to bring up the cavalry companies of Harrison and Wickham, camped at Fairfax Station, three miles from the court-house. Captain Thornton, I was informed, went on this duty. Neither man, nor beast, that I could ascertain, sustained the slightest injury in this collision. Having been left to my own discretion, and perfectly satisfied that my position was untenable against a
Fannie H. Marr (search for this): chapter 7.64
, and the men sleeping in the court-house. Captain Marr's company of rifles, about ninety strong, wen seen by him, he being out on a scout. Captain Marr, after making his company comfortable in this brought me within about one hundred yards of Marr's command. I shall be pardoned, I trust, for ised, by little more than half his number of Captain Marr's rifles. Lieutenant Tompkins says: It w In the meantime, the alarm having reached Captain Marr also, he promptly deployed his company in S instant death. It was reported to me that Captain Marr, when found, was upon his face, with his swssing events, to belt it round his person. Captain Marr being thus killed, a fact unknown to his menemy on his return, turning in the direction of Marr's men, near the Stevenson road was, in the extrith no other object than to alarm — killing Captain Marr by a chance shot at a distance of three hunt wounding of Colonel Ewell, the killing of Captain Marr, and the dispersion of the whole Confederat[3 more...]
re named; and I will add, that the only additional force which came to our assistance was sent for by Colonel Ewell, and was composed of the cavalry companies of Harrison and Wickham, who did not reach the Courthouse until after sunrise, and fully two hours after the enemy had been finally repulsed, by little more than half his nuirst entered the turn-pike, (for I saw no more of him afterwards,) that Colonel Ewell left the command to dispatch a courier to bring up the cavalry companies of Harrison and Wickham, camped at Fairfax Station, three miles from the court-house. Captain Thornton, I was informed, went on this duty. Neither man, nor beast, that I cno reinforcements joined us until long after his inglorious retreat before an inferior force; and that the only force which did join us were the companies of Captains Harrison and Wickham, for whom Colonel Ewell had sent, and they did not arrive until some time after sunrise. Lieutenant Tompkins officially reports that, twenty-fiv
ent to the Courthouse, which I learn from reliable authority, increased their force to upwards of 1,000 men. Twenty-five of the enemy were killed and wounded. Captains Cary, Fearing and Adjutant Frank, of the Fifth New York State Militia, accompanied the command as volunteers, and did very effective service. I regret to state that Captain Cary was wounded in the foot. (The concluding paragraph of Lieutenant Tompkins's official report is omitted as unnecessary.) The following report by General McDowell, commanding, had been previously made to the Adjutant-General: Arlington, June 1, 1861-12 M. Sir,--The following facts have just been report of Company B, Second Cavalry, consisting of fifty men, with Second Lieutenant David S. Gordon's Second Dragoons temporially attached. He subsequently adds: Captains Cary, Fearing and Adjutant Frank, of the Fifth New York State Militia, accompanied the command as volunteers. General McDowell says: It appears that Company B, Sec
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