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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
patches to the War Department.— cavalry withdrawn from South Carolina and Georgia. General Beauregard returns to Charlestonely the Third, Sixth, and Second Military Districts of South Carolina and the District of Georgia. It read thus: Hen, namely: From Alabama and Mississippi10,000 From South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida8,000 From North Carolina2,000 nd, disclosing a probable movement of the enemy on the South Carolina coast, and warning General Beauregard to be prepared few Ironsides never fired another shot (on the coast of South Carolina) after this attack upon her. She remained some time atppointment of three major-generals, to take command of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, with a view of thus converting er of higher rank than brigadier-general to command in South Carolina. General Hill has not entered on duty; he is awaiting rthwith. I will leave to-morrow. I have recalled all South Carolina and Georgia troops from Florida, except one battalion
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
his state of affairs, throwing aside all other considerations, subordinating all other operations to this one vital campaign, at a concerted moment we must withdraw from other points a portion of their forces—all, indeed, not absolutely essential for keeping up a show of defence, or safety against a coup de main— and concentrate in this way every soldier possible for operations against General Grant. Such strategic points as Richmond, Weldon, Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, and Meridian—or Jackson, Mississippi, at the same time— should be fortified, garrisoned, and provisioned, according to their relative present value to the Confederate States, sufficiently to prolong their defence, if attacked or besieged, until troops for their relief could be detached as required from the army in Northwestern Georgia. I will now state approximately what troops may, in my belief, be withdrawn from the following quarters and added to the army at or about Dalton, namely: From Alaba
Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
at once near the mouth of Trout Creek, a few miles below, Jacksonville, to cut off its communication with the mouth of the river. This would insure the fall or evacuation of both places. Colonel D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer of the Department, will remain with you for the present, and has received my general instructions relative to the works referred to. As soon as you shall be able to dispense with his services you will send him to make the necessary examinations about St. Mark's and Tallahassee, to guard those important points from any attack from the Gulf. Captain Pliny Bryan, A. A.-Genl., is in charge of the torpedoes to be put in the St. John's River. He must consult Colonel Harris as to their location. Captain Bryan is also a very good signal officer; capable of reading the enemy's signals, he would be a good inspector of that branch of the service. You will please keep me well advised, at Charleston, of all movements of the enemy in your district. A telegram should
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Colonel Harris, Chief-Engineer, has been directed to throw up certain defensive works across the country, from the Ashley to the Edisto. 5th. The line in rear of the Edisto, from Four Hole Creek to the South Carolina Railroad bridge, above Branchville, will be defended by Colonel Williams's regiment of State troops already there, reinforced by a portion of Brigadier-General Walker's command, until they can be relieved by other troops in the Department. 6th. From the Edisto to the Savannah River, near the southern boundary of Barnwell District, will be defended or guarded, as far as practicable, by the remainder of Brigadier-General Walker's command. That officer will construct such field-works, rifle-pits, abatis, and make such overflows, as the means at his disposal and the nature of the country will permit. 7th. Brigadier-Generals Robertson and Walker will resort to such expedients as the beating of drums, firing of salutes and rockets, as will deceive the enemy. A tempo
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Northwestern Georgia. I will now state approximately what troops may, in my belief, be withdrawn from the following quarters and added to the army at or about Dalton, namely: From Alabama and Mississippi10,000 From South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida8,000 From North Carolina2,000 From Virginia20,000 ——— Total40,000 the Department already indicated, should be quickly, quietly concentrated at suitable central points, thence to be thrown forward, with all possible despatch, to Dalton, with all the means of transportation available of all sorts. At the same time the officer appointed to command this army should make all his preparations forrks are next to useless if not garrisoned properly. I have therefore applied for the temporary return of Walker's brigade, which is now doing nothing, at or near Dalton. It is evident that the enemy, having taken Chattanooga for their spring campaign, are now returning Meade's corps as fast as possible, for fear of being foresta<
Ocean Pond (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
to concentrate before moving on Lake City. In the mean time General Finegan, with all the reinforcements he had thus far been able to procure, had marched to Ocean Pond, on the Olustee River, and, on the 13th, with not more than 2000 men of all arms, resolutely awaited the enemy's advance. Several days of anxious suspense we's Island, and withdraw hastily before daybreak, thus releasing and enabling Colquitt's command to reach General Finegan in time to meet and defeat the enemy at Ocean Pond, some thirteen miles in advance of Lake City. In the meanwhile other troops, fast as the means of railroad transportation would enable me, had been despatche21st ultimo, to assume command, and organize for a vigorous offensive movement preliminary to the arrival of General Taliaferro; but subsequently the victory of Ocean Pond having taken place, in which it was supposed General Gardner, though not in immediate command, had taken an active part, I directed that officer to assume the c
Seabrook Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
tion, doubtless, of my attempt to reinforce Finegan, made a strong demonstration on John's Island. Though assured of the purpose of this movement, it assumed, however, so serious a form as to compel me to divert, temporarily, General Colquitt and three and a half regiments of his brigade, to reinforce General Wise, then confronted by at least two brigades of the enemy (about four thousand five hundred strong), pushed forward in advance of the Haulover, or bridge-way between John's and Seabrook's islands, and in addition several regiments of infantry were detached from Sullivan's and James islands, to be in readiness for the development of the enemy's purposes. On the night of the 11th ultimo I ordered all our batteries bearing on Morris Island to open a heavy simultaneous fire on that portion, as if a cover for an assault, and with the hope of forcing the enemy to withdraw from John's Island to the protection of his own works. This stratagem seems to have produced the desired effe
Trout Creek (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
y by the cavalry on his flanks, and the infantry on his rear. Should the enemy divide his forces by reinforcing strongly those already at Palatka, the proposed battery at Fleming's Island, on the St. John's, should be constructed at once, and torpedoes put in the river, so as to prevent its navigation. Should the enemy, after fortifying strongly Jacksonville and Palatka, leave those two places, with only a strong garrison in each, a battery should be put up at once near the mouth of Trout Creek, a few miles below, Jacksonville, to cut off its communication with the mouth of the river. This would insure the fall or evacuation of both places. Colonel D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer of the Department, will remain with you for the present, and has received my general instructions relative to the works referred to. As soon as you shall be able to dispense with his services you will send him to make the necessary examinations about St. Mark's and Tallahassee, to guard those important
Sanderson (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
8th. General Finegan, with his well-known energy, immediately issued all necessary orders for the concentration of his scattered troops, and lost no time in notifying General Beauregard of the emergency. From Jacksonville the enemy, unhindered, pressed on to Baldwin; then to Barber's; then to Sanderson, and was, on the 11th, within three miles of Lake City. There his progress was checked by a force composed of about 450 infantry, 100 cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. He fell back to Sanderson, and thence to Barber's, on the east bank of the St. Mary's, where he evidently intended to concentrate before moving on Lake City. In the mean time General Finegan, with all the reinforcements he had thus far been able to procure, had marched to Ocean Pond, on the Olustee River, and, on the 13th, with not more than 2000 men of all arms, resolutely awaited the enemy's advance. Several days of anxious suspense were thus passed, during which, to the great relief of all, the following t
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
tried and hung, as reported by Northern newspapers, for using an engine of war not recognized by civilized nations. But the Government of the United States has now a torpedo corps, intended specially to study and develop that important branch of the military service. After a captivity of many months in Forts Lafayette and Warren, Glassel and Sullivan were finally exchanged for the captain and a sailor of the Federal steamer Isaac Smith, a heavily-armed gunboat, which was captured in the Stono River, with its entire crew of one hundred and thirty officers and men. * * * Captain Glassel's two other companions, Engineer Tomb and Pilot Cannon, after swimming about for a while, espied the David, still afloat, drifting with the current. They betook themselves to it, relit the fires from its bull's-eye lantern, got up steam, and started back for the city. They had to repass through the fleet, and they received the fire of several of its monitors and gunboats, fortunately without injury.
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