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Michael Hahn (search for this): chapter 5
gers, clerk of the late Chamber and candidate for the next, is waiting in Kellogg's anteroom, with his official roll. Michael Hahn, a lawyer, whom the Republican party have pricked for Speaker, sits in Kellogg's cabinet. The scalawags distrust MichMichael Hahn, on account of his legal scruples, but their party is too poor in law to overlook his claim. Who else is fit to stand against Louis A. Wiltz? Some members want to have a Negro in the chair. Some others, heated by spiced liquors, say they sans. Guess dat true, hiccups his no less tipsy comrade, Ole Pinch some Nig. Bravo Pinch! Pinchback is with Kellogg, Hahn, and Campbell, waiting in the cabinet for a chance. If six or seven Conservatives, led by curiosity, should happen to drop in, a legal quorum would be present, and the roll might be called, Hahn voted to the chair, and Vigers appointed Clerk. Some trimmers of the Warmoth school are noticed slipping in and out-only, as they say, to see the fun and get a drink. Pinch
row, a Republican officer, is travelling through the country, and reporting on affairs to General Sherman. Morrow reports, according to his observation, that the South is loyal to the Union, but opposed to scalawags and carpet-baggers. The Republican majority in Congress, scared by the November elections, have appointed a committee to visit New Orleans and look into the state of things. Three members of this committee, Foster of Ohio, a Republican, Phelps of New Jersey, a Republican, and Potter of New York, a Democrat, are in the city taking evidence, and the two Republicans hardly hide their agreement with the Democrat, that the attempt to govern through the aid of Federal soldiery is the cause of all the disorder seen about the Gulf. With critics so unfriendly to disarm, it is Kellogg's policy to seek some safe and legal ground; but where in Louisiana can intruders like Kellogg find that safe and legal ground? McEnery is not only stronger in votes but in repute and training.
William P. Kellogg (search for this): chapter 5
o represent all the great shades of opinion. Kellogg named this board, and in open violation of tservatives had a majority of twenty-nine; but Kellogg's illegal Returning Board has continued to sw Five cases referred. One hit is scored by Kellogg. If pretexts can be found for shutting out td vote until their cases have been heard; but Kellogg thinks that rules which govern free assemblieervative majority from indicting and deposing Kellogg, as Governor Warmoth was indicted and deposeds a quorum is a body open to arrangements. Kellogg believes that some of the voters may be bough With critics so unfriendly to disarm, it is Kellogg's policy to seek some safe and legal ground; th, culture, eloquence are on their side. In Kellogg's group there is hardly a man of name. Amonged dining-room into a legislative hall. By Kellogg's orders, planks are nailed across the doors cigars displayed. When everything is ready, Kellogg sends his scouts into the streets to bid Negr[12 more...]
a show of legal order or confess his failure and retire. His faction in the country is getting sick of him — a man who brings them no substantial gain, and lays them open to reproach of Caesarism. To Kellogg's last appeal for help, the President wired, impatiently: It is exceedingly unpalatable to use troops in anticipation of danger; let the State authorities be right, and then proceed with their duties. Other critics, also of his own party, show as much impatience as the President. Colonel Morrow, a Republican officer, is travelling through the country, and reporting on affairs to General Sherman. Morrow reports, according to his observation, that the South is loyal to the Union, but opposed to scalawags and carpet-baggers. The Republican majority in Congress, scared by the November elections, have appointed a committee to visit New Orleans and look into the state of things. Three members of this committee, Foster of Ohio, a Republican, Phelps of New Jersey, a Republican, and
P. H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 5
oop of horse. The Commodore lays his ships so as to rake the wharf and sweep Canal Street. A body of Marines is held in readiness to land. General De Trobriand, Emory's second in command, receives orders to proceed at dawn to Royal Street. Sheridan remains at his hotel. Conservative scouts who visit the Rotunda, to observe his motions, find him as usual, dawdling about, puffing his cigar, and laughing with the members of his staff, as though he had no more concern with what is passing at rvative scouts who visit the Rotunda, to observe his motions, find him as usual, dawdling about, puffing his cigar, and laughing with the members of his staff, as though he had no more concern with what is passing at the State House and the arsenals than any other guest in the hotel. Carnival-day is nigh. King Carnival is announced as coming; and the comic writers — a conspicuous body in New Orleans — are hinting that King Philip is that prince in masquerade. Sheridan only laughs and smok
he Conservatives not only a legal quorum but a working majority of five members. All these fifty-eight Conservatives are White. If such a house should meet the Kelloggites are lost. A first battle has been fought in the Returning Board — a body Among them may be good Republicans, men who heartily believe there is no way of saving Black equality except by crushing White freedom; but these Republicans have no voice in the clubs and drawing-rooms where White men meet and White women reign. White men meet and White women reign. They stand apart, committed by their heresies to a social ban. In Kellogg's list of fifty-three adherents, twenty-eight are Negroes. Nearly all these Negroes have been slaves-labourers in the rice-ground and the cotton-field. A few can read prWhite women reign. They stand apart, committed by their heresies to a social ban. In Kellogg's list of fifty-three adherents, twenty-eight are Negroes. Nearly all these Negroes have been slaves-labourers in the rice-ground and the cotton-field. A few can read print, and scratch their names; not many can do either; while only three or four can express their meaning in decent English words. Most of them are so poor and ignorant, so vain and shifty, that Kellogg dares not trust them in the streets and grog-s
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5: the State House. Sunday, January 3, is a busy day in St. Louis Street, the next day being marked, on both sides, as the date on which the great conflict is to be carried from the streets into the legislative halls. Monday is to either make or mar the scalawag government in New Orleans. Out of one hundred and eleven members recently elected to the lower house, fifty-eight are called Conservative, fifty-three Republican; giving the Conservatives not only a legal quorum but a working majority of five members. All these fifty-eight Conservatives are White. If such a house should meet the Kelloggites are lost. A first battle has been fought in the Returning Board — a body of five assessors, who, according to statute, should be chosen from both parties, so as to represent all the great shades of opinion. Kellogg named this board, and in open violation of the law, selected five Republicans. By law the sittings should be held in public, so that every word should b
to use troops in anticipation of danger; let the State authorities be right, and then proceed with their duties. Other critics, also of his own party, show as much impatience as the President. Colonel Morrow, a Republican officer, is travelling through the country, and reporting on affairs to General Sherman. Morrow reports, according to his observation, that the South is loyal to the Union, but opposed to scalawags and carpet-baggers. The Republican majority in Congress, scared by the November elections, have appointed a committee to visit New Orleans and look into the state of things. Three members of this committee, Foster of Ohio, a Republican, Phelps of New Jersey, a Republican, and Potter of New York, a Democrat, are in the city taking evidence, and the two Republicans hardly hide their agreement with the Democrat, that the attempt to govern through the aid of Federal soldiery is the cause of all the disorder seen about the Gulf. With critics so unfriendly to disarm, it i
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