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Montgomery Blair (search for this): chapter 2.32
Hope or Pickett's Mill. Still, the greater part of the Confederate front was strung along threading a rugged forest country, with excellent positions for artillery, and rough ridges which were easily fortified and hard to take. Hardee, at Dallas, had in his vicinity a grand military position, which it would do a West Pointer good to survey-well chosen, well manned by the best of troops thoroughly seasoned in war. McPherson, opposite Hardee, had just now not more than 20,000 men, for Blair's troops, marching at the time from the Far West, had not yet joined him. But Davis's division of the Fourteenth Corps (about 5,000 men) was sent back by Sherman to strengthen McPherson's command, because McPherson was so widely separated from the rest of us. From Van Wert, McPherson had hastened on, with Dodge's corps in the lead. Dodge never said much in advance of what he proposed to do, but he was a most vigorous commander and inspired the men who served under him with his own energy
R. W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 2.32
ce with the plan of our leader, one division of my corps, Wood's, and one of the Fourteenth, R. W. Johnson's, were drawn back from the fighting line, and early on the morning of the 27th started on tcolumn and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. This was far beyond d was on hand fully prepared. In the first desperate charge, Hazen's brigade was in front. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, somewhat to its left. Scribner's brigade was in thatrly on open ground, attract the attention of the enemy to that part of the line, while Wood and Johnson moved upon what was supposed to be the extreme right of the Confederates' position. In this to a great success. But, while Hazen and the remainder of Wood's division were gaining ground, Johnson's division, which was at Hazen's left, was going on toward Pickett's Mill. This was situated o
pared barricades of Dodge. This assault, though most desperate and determined, was promptly and gallantly met and repulsed. The other Confederate division (Cheatham's) opposite Davis simply strengthened its skirmish line and pushed it forward briskly and persistently in front of Davis's gallant men, resulting, of course, in some losses on both sides. These vigorous efforts of Walker and Cheatham had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in place and prevent them from reinforcing Logan. Within an hour and a half the attack upon the whole right had proven a costly failure to the enemy, and his lines had been hurriedly withneral Johnston's orders or not, was a correspondingly heavy assault of Bate's and part of Walker's divisions, supported by the rest of Walker's and the whole of Cheatham's, against Sherman's right flank. There was a decided repulse in each case. The scales were thus evenly balanced. After the failure of Hardee on the afterno
cannon and covering them by a strong field work, just in the edge of heavy timber near his left and well to the front, whence he could shell the enemy now intrenched on the Knob. Very early, with a couple of staff officers, my faithful orderly, McDonald, and private secretary, J. A. Sladen, Thirty-third Massachusetts (afterwards my aid-de-camp), I rode to the four-gun battery; leaving my comrades I took a stand on the improvised fort where I could see and direct every move. A Confederate batteifteen minutes had crowned the knoll. It was Colonel Frank Askew, and he had done with 200 men what I had intended Nodine to do with his entire brigade. Leaving orders for Nodine and Kirby to hurry up their brigades, I mounted and, followed by McDonald and Sladen, galloped to the front and stayed there with the gallant Fifteenth Ohio men till the reinforcements with shovels and picks had joined them. The suddenness of our charge and the quickness of our riflemen cleared the Bald Knob and rest
Frank Gilman (search for this): chapter 2.32
next in place to McPherson, near to and advancing upon Pine Top, while Schofield remained nearer the angle at Gilgal Church. Our line, like that of the Confederates', was about ten miles long, and conformed to all the irregularities of Johnston's intrenchments. The Georgia mud was deep, the water stood in pools, and it was hard to get fires to cook our food and dry spots sufficiently large upon which to spread a tent fly or soldier's blanket. A young man from Boston who joined me, Mr. Frank Gilman, and who became my private secretary, though well and strong when he arrived, and full of patriotic fervor, with an earnest desire to remain, could not bear the wear and tear of our mud bivouac here near Big Shanty. He lost his appetite and little by little his flesh; then, being attacked by chills and fever, was obliged to seek the hospital, and, finally, to save his life, he returned to his home. But the most of the soldiers were now veterans, and so inured to hardships that the mud
o gain ground toward our left. Thomas and Schofield, with the majority of their troops, were eng part of the line lately occupied by Hooker, Schofield, and myself. In this he was still assisted by Jeff. C. Davis's division. Thomas and Schofield were then free for the leftward operation. Ssses that from Burnt Hickory to Marietta. Schofield now promptly deployed his line and pushed soacross the creek in a terrific thunderstorm, Schofield's men forced their way close up to the Confeat date Johnston learned of the extension of Schofield's and Hooker's commands, he saw that his oldal line from Lost Mountain with Pine Top. Schofield, about the same time, drove a line of skirmig up Hardee's backward movement. Thomas and Schofield, now in the right wing of our army, early iney reached the Marietta Crossroads. Cox (of Schofield's), with his division, was feeling forward fies on the bluff were exposed to full view. Schofield's men made a rapid rush across the open grou[5 more...]
is way was contested by skirmishing Confederates, but now, slowly and steadily, without general battle, the enemy was forced back to a partially new intrenched position, south of Allatoona Creek, back as far as the forks of the Dallas-Ackworth road. Here, charging across the creek in a terrific thunderstorm, Schofield's men forced their way close up to the Confederate works. They were as near to them as 250 yards, tenaciously holding the ground gained and actively intrenching. Meanwhile, Stoneman, beyond Schofield, with his cavalry had already seized the village of Allatoona, near the pass, getting there June 1st, where, taking a strong position, the work of repairing the railroad northward and southward began, and progressed with little or no opposition. At the time Schofield and Hooker were steadily advancing, Thomas was also moving the rest of us to the left from the vicinity of Pickett's Mill, Thomas being on the lead himself with Baird's division. Thomas's army in this effo
Harry Stinson (search for this): chapter 2.32
missile had penetrated his lungs and made its way entirely through his body. I thought at first that my brave young friend was dead, and intense grief seized my heart, for Harry was much beloved. After a few minutes, however, by means of some stimulant, he revived and recovered consciousness. He was taken back to camp, and soon sent to Cleveland, Tenn., where good air and good nursing brought him so near to recovery that he joined me again during this campaign at Jonesboro. I think Harry Stinson was the most unselfish man I ever saw, was the remark of another of my aids, Captain J. A. Sladen. Wood's division was at last drawn out of the marching column and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. This was far beyond Schofield's left. Wood touched a large clearing, turned to the southeast, and moved forward, keeping in the edge of the clearing, towar
J. B. McPherson (search for this): chapter 2.32
completing their deployments extending from McPherson, near Dallas, toward Johnston's right, and test of troops thoroughly seasoned in war. McPherson, opposite Hardee, had just now not more tha men) was sent back by Sherman to strengthen McPherson's command, because McPherson was so widely sMcPherson was so widely separated from the rest of us. From Van Wert, McPherson had hastened on, with Dodge's corps in thMcPherson had hastened on, with Dodge's corps in the lead. Dodge never said much in advance of what he proposed to do, but he was a most vigorous comlieve Davis and send him back to Thomas, and McPherson was preparing to do so and to close his armyg on our right. It will thus be seen that McPherson was loyally preparing to carry out his instrght to left began again in good earnest, and McPherson left the Dallas line and marched over beyondded only for a temporary resort. At last, McPherson, still going toward the east, reached and fonother leftward effort, was next in place to McPherson, near to and advancing upon Pine Top, while [2 more...]
rson was so widely separated from the rest of us. From Van Wert, McPherson had hastened on, with Dodge's corps in the lead. Dodge never said much in advance of what he proposed to do, but he was a most vigorous commander and inspired the men who served under him with his own energy. Well protected by skirmishers, he now approached the Pumpkin Vine Creek, and encountered the enemy's skirmishers and advance guards and drove them steadily back. During May 25th, while Thomas was assailing Hood at New Hope Church, Jeff. C. Davis, prompt, systematic, and active, extended and thoroughly protected Dodge's left at Dallas. Meanwhile, John A. Logan, commanding the Fifteenth Corps, had taken on the inspiration of fighting-like a horse just ready for battle-and was veering off to the right of Dodge. On Logan's right, clearing the way, and, like the cavalry opposite, securing all approaches and occupying as much attention as possible, was Garrard's cavalry command. Logan was intensely
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