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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864.. Search the whole document.

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Brick House (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ent grew out of a nearly universal confidence in our commander and his lieutenants. The boys will remember the somewhat exciting sport, incident to pig-hunting and slaying in the reedy, sedgy, muddy marsh, along the Pamunkey, at the rear of Brick House,—unfortunate porkers, victims first of surprise, then of assault, and finally of the frying-pan or the camp-kettle. It was during our halt previous to marching to Brick House, when, as we have remarked, comrades of the Eighteenth and TwentyBrick House, when, as we have remarked, comrades of the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Massachusetts were in our camp, that McClellan's main army in its advance from Yorktown had reached a point near Roper's Church on the Williamsburg and Richmond road. These men belonged to Gen. Porter's Corps (Fifth), which, with the corps of Generals Sumner and Franklin (Sixth), was to form the right wing and to proceed by the way of Cumberland and of Whitehouse on the Pamunkey, striking the Chickahominy at New Bridge, while the left wing, consisting of the corps of Heintzelman and Ke
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Sumner's corps. But during nine hours, while we were sailing up the York, the ever brave men of Hooker's command, among whom were the First and Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteers, fought desperately and lost heavily; the Federal loss during the day is said to have been 2,228. Magruder retired during the night, leaving 700 of his severely wounded. The direction of his retreat would be necessarily northwest. At sunset, when we approached the right bank of the York, near the mouth of the Pamunkey, the gunboats having anchored somewhat below the point whither our transports were tending, the forces must still have been engaged at Williamsburg. It would then seem that the object of the expedition up the York, and the engagement of Franklin's division the next day, on the right bank of that river, must have been to intercept the Confederate force retiring from Yorktown, and to form a junction with McClellan's main army. A conversation audible to men in the vicinity of the speakers, b
Henry Warner Slocum (search for this): chapter 5
art of an ostentatious movement of troops, designed to convey the idea that Jackson was to be reinforced in the valley; while really Gen. Lee was contemplating the withdrawal of that army to augment the already large force which, drawn from the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-p<
cross the peninsula. On the west side of this stream, occupying a line eleven miles long, strongly entrenched, was Gen. Magruder, having under his command a force variously stated, from 5,000 to 13,000 men. McClellan reached the vicinity of th00 preceded him to Fortress Monroe, and as many more soon followed. When he was ready to open fire, May 4, it was found Magruder had retired. The division commanded by Gen. Wm. B. Franklin, during the brief period after our arrival at Ship Point, h been stopped near Williamsburg by works called Fort Magruder, Gen. Hooker's division was in action, stoutly resisted by Magruder's force. Ultimately the Confederate position was flanked by Gen. Hancock of Sumner's corps. But during nine hours, whisachusetts Volunteers, fought desperately and lost heavily; the Federal loss during the day is said to have been 2,228. Magruder retired during the night, leaving 700 of his severely wounded. The direction of his retreat would be necessarily northw
William Buel Franklin (search for this): chapter 5
ed from Washington. His force must have been 100,000 strong, for 58,000 preceded him to Fortress Monroe, and as many more soon followed. When he was ready to open fire, May 4, it was found Magruder had retired. The division commanded by Gen. Wm. B. Franklin, during the brief period after our arrival at Ship Point, had not moved out to take position in the line of the besieging force. Our battery had been occupied much as an artillery company in camp is wont to be: there were battery drillslating the withdrawal of that army to augment the already large force which, drawn from the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16
William J. Wheeler (search for this): chapter 5
hird Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, 6th Maine. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. H. Brooks, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Davidson, 33d, 77th, 49th New York Volunteers, and 7th Maine Volunteers. Artillery. Ayres's F, 5th United States, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Mott's 3d New York Battery, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Wheeler's E, 1st New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Kennedy's 1st New York Battery, 6 3-inch Ordnanc
hird Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, 6th Maine. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. H. Brooks, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Davidson, 33d, 77th, 49th New York Volunteers, and 7th Maine Volunteers. Artillery. Ayres's F, 5th United States, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Mott's 3d New York Battery, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Wheeler's E, 1st New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Kennedy's 1st New York Battery, 6 3-inch Ordnanc
Joseph E. Johnson (search for this): chapter 5
lar spectacle across the swamp. What was the significance of it, we never knew. It did not immediately result in any change of position on our part. It has been conjectured that this was a part of an ostentatious movement of troops, designed to convey the idea that Jackson was to be reinforced in the valley; while really Gen. Lee was contemplating the withdrawal of that army to augment the already large force which, drawn from the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsy<
Philip Kearney (search for this): chapter 5
ent to the commander of the left wing, Gen. Heintzelman, is said to have been delayed so that it was five o'clock before Kearney's division arrived, and after dark before the arrival of Gen. Hooker from White Oak Swamp. During these days, while tr's approach, he at once formed a line facing Fair Oaks and prepared to hold it. It was now five P. M.; brave, impetuous Kearney now arrived before Seven Pines, deployed a brigade to the left so as to have a flank fire upon the Confederate lines, wh division now appeared upon the scene, but night brought cessation from further strife on this day. During the night, Kearney's, Couch's, and a portion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouack as at dark; all his artillery that could be moved was brought up, and Richardson was placed on his left to connect with Kearney. French's brigade was placed along the railroad. Howard's brigade formed a second line, and the Irish brigade, a thir
W. S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 5
half-way to the James, where McClellan's advance had been stopped near Williamsburg by works called Fort Magruder, Gen. Hooker's division was in action, stoutly resisted by Magruder's force. Ultimately the Confederate position was flanked by Gen. Hancock of Sumner's corps. But during nine hours, while we were sailing up the York, the ever brave men of Hooker's command, among whom were the First and Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteers, fought desperately and lost heavily; the Federal loss duringParrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, 6th Maine. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. H. Brooks, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Davidson, 33d, 77th, 49th New York Volunteers, and 7th Mai<
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