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M. L. Johnson (search for this): chapter 6
n known to him; many of them had served in the squadron before, and were present at the capture of the Port Royal forts; they were men of the highest professional capacity and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engaged in it. Had any loss of life been regarded as likely to render another attempt successful, there would have been few indeed who would not have desired it. The opinion before the attack was general, and was fully shared in by the writer, that whatever might be the loss in men and vessels, blown up by torpedoes or otherwise destro
Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. On April 2, 1863, the Rear-Admiral left Port Royal to join the ironclads, as the monitors were styled, at North Edisto, and on the morning of the 5th left for Charleston Bar with all of them in tow of suitable vessels. As previously arranged, on arrival, the Keokuk, aided by Captain Boutelle and Master Platt of the Coast Survey, sounded and buoyed the bar of the main ship channel, supported by the monitors Patapsco and Catskill. This was soon accomplished, and before dark these two monitors anchored within. At high tide on the following morning, the Admiral came in on board of the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner, and was followed by the five monitors yet outside, and by the Keokuk. He intended to proceed the same day to the attack of Fort Sumter, and thence to the city of Charleston, but the weather became so hazy that the ranges could not be seen and the pilots refused to go farther. The state of the atmosphere prevented a satis
George H. Wood (search for this): chapter 6
for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw over six and one-half feet of water, and be out of water amidships about fifteen inches. The contracts were made generally in the spring of 1863, and the vessels were to be furnished in the fall of that year. The Chimo, at Boston, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in the hands of Rear-Admiral Gregory, Chief-Engineer Wood, and Captain Ericsson (letter of Assistant Secretary of the Navy, December 15, 1864, to Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. 3, 1865).
John L. Worden (search for this): chapter 6
ssing at right angles, bolted together, about fifty feet in length, shaped not unlike a boot-jack, the bows of the vessel propelling within the notch. The after-ends or jaws of the raft were secured by chains to the bow of the vessel. The wave-motion acting on this cumbrous mass was quite different from that of the monitor. It proved to be a battering ram, and loosened the armor plating on the bows of the Weehawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Keokuk, Commander A. C. Rhind. The vessels were ordered to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range of Fort Sumter they were to open upon it, and take position to the north and west, at a distance of ei
e for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw over six and one-half feet of water, and be out of water amidships about fifteen inches. The contracts were made generally in the spring of 1863, and the vessels were to be furnished in the fall of that year. The Chimo, at Boston, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in the hands of Rear-Admiral Gregory, Chief-Engineer Wood, and Captain Ericsson (letter of Assistant Secretary of the Navy, December 15, 1864, to Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. 3, 1865).
George E. Belknap (search for this): chapter 6
mes was only one foot clear of the bottom. A shot striking the forward facing of a port shutter knocked it off. The damage done to the ship from the fire of the enemy was not material, and the opinion was expressed that at the distance of 1,000 yards the armor plating would prove invulnerable to such shot as were fired at the vessel. He expressed great admiration of the conduct of officers and men, and would fall short of his duty if he omitted to present to especial notice Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap, the executive officer. It is proper to note the fact that without exception the commanding officers of all of the vessels engaged spoke in the highest terms of those under their command. The names, which may be seen in the official reports, are omitted for lack of space and fear of taxing the patience of the reader. Rear-Admiral Dupont, in his several reports to the Department, states that he moved in line of battle as before given, in the New Ironsides, with seven iron
ed yards apart; they steered very badly if obliged to stop the engines, sheering every way, and the raft on the bow of the Weehawken delayed her, and caused wild steering along the whole line, so it was about 2.50 P. M. when she was opened on by Moultrie, followed at once by Sumter, and all of the batteries within effective range. The Weehawken was then somewhat above Fort Wagner. At about 3.05 she opened fire on Fort Sumter, followed by the other monitors, at or before they arrived at the sap, several buoys of different colors were seen; the vessels passed between them and Morris Island, but nor far from them, perhaps within one hundred and fifty yards. It was observed that the different vessels, in bringing the buoys in range with Moultrie or batteries on that shore, received in turn a heavy fire, and it was supposed probable that they marked torpedoes; they certainly served to indicate distance, and the ranges of the guns had been practically established on them, which greatly in
Samuel Francis Dupont (search for this): chapter 6
tted for lack of space and fear of taxing the patience of the reader. Rear-Admiral Dupont, in his several reports to the Department, states that he moved in line auregard. In a more detailed report to the Department, dated April 15th, Admiral Dupont gives with particularity the fire delivered by the vessels engaged and the italicised the sentence above, as it would exert a controlling influence on Admiral Dupont in fitting for effective service all of the ironclads under him with the le. That is to depend on your discretion or a further order. A. Lincoln. To Admiral Dupont. The following day the President issued further instructions: exnear points in your charge. Yours truly, A. Lincoln. General Hunter and Admiral Dupont. P. S.—Whoever receives this first, please send a copy to the other immediately. On April 16th, Rear-Admiral Dupont wrote to the Secretary of the Navy as follows: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt this morning, by th
A. S. Mackenzie (search for this): chapter 6
manding officers had long been known to him; many of them had served in the squadron before, and were present at the capture of the Port Royal forts; they were men of the highest professional capacity and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engaged in it. Had any loss of life been regarded as likely to render another attempt successful, there would have been few indeed who would not have desired it. The opinion before the attack was general, and was fully shared in by the writer, that whatever might be the loss in men and vessels, blown up by
George W. Rodgers (search for this): chapter 6
bows of the Weehawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Keokuk, Commander A. C. Rhind. The vessels were ordered to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range og, setting the vessels in, and made them additionally unmanageable. Soon after getting within the heavy fire of the batteries, the Weehawken signalled obstructions in her vicinity, and previous to that a torpedo had exploded close to her; Captain Rodgers' report states: We approached very close to the obstructions extending from Fort Sumter to Fort Moultrie—as near, indeed, as I could get without running upon them. They were marked by rows of casks very near together. To the eye they appea
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