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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Philip B. Thompson (search for this): chapter 21
Mercer county, sergeant-at-arms, and Walter N. Haldeman, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following executive council was chosen: Willis B. Machen, president; John W. Crockett, Philip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliot
George B. Hodge (search for this): chapter 21
hilip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisiona. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliott; Tenth, Geo. B. Hodge. The council divided the State into twelve districts and provided for an election by the State at large of personsth district, James S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, George B. Hodge; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. Moore; Eleventh district, Robert J. Breckinridge, Jr.; Twelftrcuit judge of the Louisville circuit court, 1868-73, and chancellor of the Louisville chancery court, 1874-80, while Geo. B. Hodge and Robert J. Breckinridge served as State senators, and James S. Chrisman as representative. In 1863 the followin
Samuel S. Scott (search for this): chapter 21
and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following executive council was chosen: Willis B. Machen, president; John W. Crockett, Philip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliott; Tenth, Geo. B. Hodge. The council divided the State into twelve districts and provided for an election by the State at large of persons to represent these distr
Humphrey Marshall (search for this): chapter 21
isville chancery court, 1874-80, while Geo. B. Hodge and Robert J. Breckinridge served as State senators, and James S. Chrisman as representative. In 1863 the following were elected and sent as members of the second permanent Congress: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, Geo. W. Triplett: Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, Jas. S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, Humphrey Marshall; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. Moore; Eleventh district, Ben. F. Bradley; Twelfth district, John M. Elliott. Mr. Bradley afterwards served as State senator. The legislative council, upon the admission of the State, elected Henry C. Burnett and William E. Simms senators to the Confederate Congress, and they served through the war. Upon the death of Gov. George W. Johnson, who fell on the second day at Shiloh, while fighting in the ranks, the legislative counci
George W. Ewing (search for this): chapter 21
ected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliott; Tenth, Geo. B. Hodge. The cou resulting in the choice of the following: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, John W. Crockett; Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, James S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, George B. Hodge; Ninth district, E. M.members of the second permanent Congress: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, Geo. W. Triplett: Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, Jas. S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, Humphrey Marshall; Ninth district, E. M
William Preston (search for this): chapter 21
Spencer county, treasurer, who resigned December 17th, and J. B. Burnham, of Warren county, was appointed in his place; Richard Hawes, of Bourbon county, auditor, who resigned, and Joshua Pillsbury was appointed in his place. A. Frank Brown, of Bourbon county, was chosen clerk of the council; John B. Thompson, Jr., of Mercer county, sergeant-at-arms, and Walter N. Haldeman, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following executive council was chosen: Willis B. Machen, president; John W. Crockett, Philip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1
James S. Chrisman (search for this): chapter 21
ollowing: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, John W. Crockett; Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, James S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, George B. Hodge; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. ircuit court, 1868-73, and chancellor of the Louisville chancery court, 1874-80, while Geo. B. Hodge and Robert J. Breckinridge served as State senators, and James S. Chrisman as representative. In 1863 the following were elected and sent as members of the second permanent Congress: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, Geo. W. Triplett: Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, Jas. S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, Humphrey Marshall; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. Moore; Eleventh district, Ben. F. Bradley; Twelfth di
A. Frank Brown (search for this): chapter 21
ere inconsistent with the acts of that convention and of the legislative council. George W. Johnson, of Scott county, was elected governor; Robert McKee, of Louisville, secretary of state, and Orlando F. Payne, assistant secretary of state; Theodore L. Burnett, of Spencer county, treasurer, who resigned December 17th, and J. B. Burnham, of Warren county, was appointed in his place; Richard Hawes, of Bourbon county, auditor, who resigned, and Joshua Pillsbury was appointed in his place. A. Frank Brown, of Bourbon county, was chosen clerk of the council; John B. Thompson, Jr., of Mercer county, sergeant-at-arms, and Walter N. Haldeman, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following
Henry C. Burnett (search for this): chapter 21
John B. Thompson, Jr., of Mercer county, sergeant-at-arms, and Walter N. Haldeman, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucresigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomdley; Twelfth district, John M. Elliott. Mr. Bradley afterwards served as State senator. The legislative council, upon the admission of the State, elected Henry C. Burnett and William E. Simms senators to the Confederate Congress, and they served through the war. Upon the death of Gov. George W. Johnson, who fell on the second
John Thomas (search for this): chapter 21
r of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following executive council was chosen: Willis B. Machen, president; John W. Crockett, Philip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliott; Tenth, Geo. B. Hodge. The council divided the State into twelve districts and provided for an election by the State at large of persons to represent these districts in the first permanent Congress of the Confederate States. On the designated day voting places were fixed and the election was held in all the cou
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