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d the Fourth Virginia. They were all pushed over across the Charlottesville and Staunton pike, south of and parallel with the railroad. This was promptly executed, and immediately after the move was started, the enemy started back. (Coming in behind their picket from the opposite direction from which we were expected was a complete surprise, which advantage I pressed, and was heartily seconded by the whole command. Prisoners captured told me they supposed it was Hampton's command, from Gen. Lee's army, as we had come from the direction of Charlottesville, and they had heard that morning that General Early had been reinforced from Richmond). Captain Johnson's battery was handled with great skill. He opened on the working party attempting to pull the bridge to pieces with splendid effect. They scattered and started back at a run, and as long as there was a mark to fire at, east of Waynesboro, his guns blazed at it. Arriving at the river, the First, Second and Third were mounted, b
ut fixed, another courier came, in great haste, for me to move the brigade back to the left, as Averill and Torbert were coming in on the Martinsburg road, and had overpowered our small force of cava moving up to meet a very large force who were coming down the pike. Two divisions of cavalry, Averill's and Torbert's, were now just ahead and in sight. Averill had sent a mounted regiment to takeAverill had sent a mounted regiment to take Fort Hill, to the north of Winchester, and a very commanding position to the west of the pike. General Early had no idea of allowing him to hold it, as that covered the pike below, and sent orders Third Virginia the protection of the led horses, and we had just gotten well into the fort when Averill charged to recapture it; but we gave them a rough welcome, and sent them back faster than they d held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only force between Ramseur and Averill and Torbert; thus their three divisions of 11,000 cavalry: indeed more mounted men by double th
Jubal A. Early (search for this): chapter 95
hanged a few shots and moved on and joined General Early at New Town. Our battery at the fort had e doom of Early's army was inevitable; indeed, Early's army should never have been allowed to go tor of the enemy upon their line of retreat; but Early was fully alive to this danger and had guardedter the cavalry action at Millford on the 22d, Early had sent in haste for a brigade of Wickham's fg to my recollection. The morning after General Early's retreat from Fisher's Hill, he sent for ft me in command and went in person to see General Early, across the mountain. In his route he metsame couriers that it would not be safe to General Early; that Early could not know what was in oure could hold this part of the enemy's cavalry, Early was safe. Torbert, running out his artilleryns had gone up the main Staunton pike with General Early's train, and we were getting very short ofand with them had some sharp skirmishing. General Early was now expecting reinforcements. Fight[13 more...]
henandoah and his right on a knob of the Blue Ridge, occupying a short and compact line. The banks of the creek seemed to Torbert too precipitous for a direct attack, and not knowing, he says, that the army had made an attack at Fisher's Hill, and thinking that the sacrifice would be too great to attack without that knowledge, I concluded to withdraw to a point opposite McCoy's Ford. On the 23d Wilson crossed McCoy's Ford, and Merritt went back through Front Royal, where he skirmished with Mosby during the afternoon. News was received of the victory at Fisher's Hill and directions to make up the Luray Valley. Both divisions at once moved forward and bivouacked at Millford creek, which the enemy had evacuated. note.—[Sheridan to Grant] September 23d: Its operations [the cavalry] up the Luray Valley, on which I calculated so much, was an entire failure. They were held at Millford by two small brigades of Fitz. Lee's division, and then fell back towards Front Royal, until after
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 95
trapped, and lost more in that one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pike this morning and drove them from Front Royal up the Luray Valley for a distance of six miles. I directed two brigades of the First Cavalry Division, with General Wilson's divisby during the afternoon. News was received of the victory at Fisher's Hill and directions to make up the Luray Valley. Both divisions at once moved forward and bivouacked at Millford creek, which the enemy had evacuated. note.—[Sheridan to Grant] September 23d: Its operations [the cavalry] up the Luray Valley, on which I calculated so much, was an entire failure. They were held at Millford by two small brigades of Fitz. Lee's division, and then fell back towards Front Royal, until afte
George E. Pond (search for this): chapter 95
e field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrative, and decide this mever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant)neral Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley and to push them vigorously. Pond says, page 178: Unfortunately Torbert did not succeed in driving Wickham's cavalry from itsidan has already said he could not get at, and that they were in a poor condition! On page 190 Pond says: After the cavalry action at Millford on the 22d, Early had sent in haste for a brigade of Wuster returned, when they withdrew and went back to Front Royal, as has already been described by Pond. Finding that they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Payne with his brigade. (At that
Bradley Johnson (search for this): chapter 95
attle of Winchester, 19th September, 1864. My brigade was moved hurriedly from the right over to the left with Bretherd's old battery, and taken by General Fitz Lee across the Red Bud Creek to relieve the heavy pressure upon a part of General Bradley Johnson's cavalry, then skirmishing with the enemy. Johnson's troops were on the left of Evans' infantry brigade of Gordon's division. We were dismounted, and became engaged very quickly; but a few well-directed shots from our horse artilleryJohnson's troops were on the left of Evans' infantry brigade of Gordon's division. We were dismounted, and became engaged very quickly; but a few well-directed shots from our horse artillery cleared our immediate front—General Fitz. Lee taking command of the whole line, Wickham of the division, I had the brigade. Our battery was moved up to the edge of a piece of timber; to our front and right was an open plateau extending for several miles. Our battery was sheltered by timber on our left. The enemy's batteries were firing obliquely to our right at our infantry and their batteries (Carter's and Braxton's). A little more than a quarter of a mile to our right was Ash Hollow, a wa
to guard the rear of the army at Cedar Creek. He found Wickham, with his own and Payne's brigades, posted on the south side of Gorny Run. At 2 A. M. of the 22d Custer's brigade was sent back across the South Fork with orders, says Torbert, to march around the enemy's flank to his rear, as he seemed too strong to attack in frontn him at New Market, through the Massanutten Gap. Torbert fell upon the other brigade, Payne's, drove it from Millford, compelled it to retreat again near Luray, Custer capturing about seventy prisoners; thence crossing through the Massanutten Gap to New Market, he proceeded up the pike to Harrisonburg, while Powell's cavalry hadhe bugles back started this column. As some of my men were now in their rear and on their flank, back they went in a hurry. Torbert continued to be active until Custer returned, when they withdrew and went back to Front Royal, as has already been described by Pond. Finding that they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Pa
R. C. Wilson (search for this): chapter 95
quickly over to the right to reinforce Lomax. Wilson's division of cavalry had massed in his front ooking to the southeast I could distinctly see Wilson's division of cavalry. Why this great body ofet in that manoeuvre Ramseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only charged with his squadron, backed by Lieutenant R. C. Wilson, of the Second Virginia, with his, anne, and our little handful was in full view of Wilson's division, now crossing in force. Wickham ha he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Froigades of the First Cavalry Division, with General Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the LurLuray Valley with the divisions of Merritt and Wilson, excepting Devins's brigade of Merritt's divis to a point opposite McCoy's Ford. On the 23d Wilson crossed McCoy's Ford, and Merritt went back tho, with a battery, had fallen back in front of Wilson's command to the mouth of the tunnel. Their p[4 more...]
S. D. Ramseur (search for this): chapter 95
that our cavalry were in the fort dismounted that Sheridan could not get at us? Is not this a singular fact? General Early says that Wickham's brigade covered Ramseur's division, the only organized command in his infantry; yet in that manoeuvre Ramseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only forcRamseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only force between Ramseur and Averill and Torbert; thus their three divisions of 11,000 cavalry: indeed more mounted men by double than Early had organized in the field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrativRamseur and Averill and Torbert; thus their three divisions of 11,000 cavalry: indeed more mounted men by double than Early had organized in the field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrative, and decide this matter in his own mind. Retreat up the Luray Valley. That night General Wickham sent my Brigade, that is the First, Second and Fourth Regiments (he retained the Third Virginia and the Battery) to Front Royal, to picket and guard the approaches from Winchester, so as to cover the Luray Valley road. I moved
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