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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Le Sueur, Le Sueur County, Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
se was supplied with arms; the city fortified by a ditch. Danger appeared on every side. The negroes, of whom the number was about two thousand, half as large as the number of the French, showed symptoms of revolt. But the brave, enterprising Le Sueur, repairing to the Choctas, ever ready to engage in excursions, won them to his aid, and was followed across the country by seven hundred of their warriors. On the river the forces of the French were assembled, and placed under the command of Loubois. Le Sueur was the first to arrive in the vicinity of 1730 the Natchez. Not expecting an attack, they were celebrating festivities, which were gladdened by the spoils of the French. Mad with triumph, and exulting in their success, on the evening of the twenty-eighth of January, they gave themselves up to sleep, after the careless manner of the wilderness. On the following morning, at daybreak, the Choctas broke upon their villages, liberated their captives, and, losing but two of the
Orleans, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
eign of seventy-two years, to die alone. He had sought to extend his Sept 1. power beyond his life by establishing a council of regency; but the will was cancelled by the parliament, and his nephew, the brave, generous, but abandoned Philip of Orleans, became absolute regent. In the event of the early death of Louis XV., who should inherit the throne of France? By the treaty of Utrecht, Philip of Anjou, accepting the crown of Spain, renounced the right of succession to that of France. If the treaty were maintained, Philip of Orleans was heir-apparent; if legitimacy could sustain the necessary succession of the nearest prince, the renunciation of the king of Spain was invalid, and the integrity of his right unimpaired. Thus the personal interest of the absolute regent in France was opposed to the rigid doctrine of legitimacy, and sought an alliance with England; while the king of Spain, under the guidance of Alberoni, was moved not less by nereditary attachment to legitimacy th
Penobscot (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
aged man, foreseeing the impending ruin of Norridgewock, replied, I count not my life dear unto myself, so I may finish with joy the ministry which I have received. The government of Massachusetts, by resolution, July. declared the eastern Indians to be traitors and robbers; and, while troops were raised for the war, it also stimulated the activity of private parties by offering for each Indian scalp at first a bounty of fifteen pounds, and afterwards of a hundred. The expedition to Penobscot was under public aus- 1723. March 4-9. pices. After five days march through the woods, Westbrooke, with his company, came upon the Indian settlement, that was probably above Bangor, at Old Williamson, II. 60 and 121. Town. He found a fort, seventy yards long, and fifty See his letter of Mar. 23, 1722-3. in breadth, well protected by stockades, fourteen feet high, enclosing twenty-three houses regularly built. On the south side, near at hand, was the chapel, sixty feet long, and thirt
Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
fortress. The party were not insensible to the advantages of the country; they observed the rich soil of Western New York, its magnificent forests, its agreeable and fertile slopes, its mild climate. A good fortress in this spot, with a reasonable settlement, will enable us—thus they reasoned—to dictate law to the Iroquois, and to exclude the English from the fur-trade. And, in 1726, four years after Burnet had built the English trading-house at Oswego, the flag of France floated from Fort Niagara. The fortress at Niagara gave a control over the commerce of the remote interior: if furs descended by the Ottawa, they went directly to Montreal; and if by way of the lakes, they passed over the portage at the falls. The boundless region in which they were gathered knew no jurisdiction but that of the French whose trading-canoes were safe in all the waters, whose bark chapels rose on every shore, whose missions extended beyond Lake Superior. The implacable Foxes were chastised, and
Hindustan (Uttar Pradesh, India) (search for this): chapter 5
the fugitives, and is, perhaps, now on the point of expiring,—their worship, their division into nobles and plebeians, their bloody funereal rites, —invite conjecture, and yet so nearly resemble in charracter the distinctions of other tribes, that they do but irritate, without satisfying, curiosity. The cost of defending Louisiana exceeding the returns from its commerce and from grants of land, the company of the Indies, seeking wealth by conquests or traffic on the coast of Guinea and Hindostan, solicited 1732 leave to surrender the Mississippi wilderness; and, on the tenth of April, 1732, the jurisdiction and control over its commerce reverted to the crown of France. The company had held possession of Louisiana for fourteen years, which were its only years of comparative prosperity. The early extravagant hopes had not subsided till emigrants had reached its soil; and the emigrants, being once established, took care of themselves. In 1735, the Canadian Bienville reappeared to
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
f their trade; and an active commerce subsisted between Albany and Montreal by means of the Christian Iroquois. In the administration of Burnwar, Fort Frontenac had been razed, and the country around it, and Montreal itself, were actually in possession of the Mohawks; so that all Upies defended the approach to Canada by water, and gave security to Montreal. The fort at Niagara had already been renewed. Among the publithem were the son of the governor of New France, De Longeuil, from Montreal, and the admirable Charlevoix, best of early writers on American he interior: if furs descended by the Ottawa, they went directly to Montreal; and if by way of the lakes, they passed over the portage at the f. The wily emissary invited their chiefs to visit the governor at Montreal and, in 1730, they descended with him to the settlement at that plthe Chickasas, receiving aid not from Illinois only, but even from Montreal and Quebec, and from France, made its rendezvous in Arkan- 1739.
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ortress of the Crown. The garrison of the French was at first stationed on the eastern shore of the lake, but soon removed to the Point, where its batteries defended the approach to Canada by water, and gave security to Montreal. The fort at Niagara had already been renewed. Among the public officers of the French, who gained influence over the red men by adapting themselves, with happy facility, to life in the wilderness, was the Indian agent Joncaire. For twenty years he had been 1721 s they reasoned—to dictate law to the Iroquois, and to exclude the English from the fur-trade. And, in 1726, four years after Burnet had built the English trading-house at Oswego, the flag of France floated from Fort Niagara. The fortress at Niagara gave a control over the commerce of the remote interior: if furs descended by the Ottawa, they went directly to Montreal; and if by way of the lakes, they passed over the portage at the falls. The boundless region in which they were gathered kn
Ryswick (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 5
tions. In the strife with France, during the government of De la Barre, some of their chiefs had fastened the arms of the duke of York to their castles; and this act was taken as a confession of irrevocable allegiance to England. The treaty of Ryswick made the condition at the commencement of hostilities the basis of occupation at the time of peace. Now, at the opening of the war, Fort Frontenac had been razed, and the country around it, and Montreal itself, were actually in possession of the Mohawks; so that all Upper Canada was declared to have become, by the treaty of Ryswick, a part of the domain of the Five Nations, and therefore subject to England. Again: at the opening of the war of the Spanish succession, the chiefs of the Mohawks and Oneidas had 1701 appeared in Albany; and the English commissioners, who could produce no treaty, had seen cause to make a minute in their books of entry, that the Mohawks and the Oneidas had placed their hunting-grounds un der the protect
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
already quietly possessed themselves of the three other great avenues from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi; for the safe possession of the route by way of the Fox and Wisconsin, they had no opponents but in the Sacs and Foxes; that by way of Chicago had been safely pursued since the days of Marquette; and a report on Indian affairs, written by Logan, in 1718, proves that they very early made use of the Keith's Ms. Memorial. Miami of the Lakes, where, after crossing the carryingplace of abo, Chap. XXIII.} they had even endeavored to debauch the affections of the Illinois, and to extirpate French dominion from the west. But the tawny envoys from the north descended to New Orleans, and presented the pipe of friendship. This, said Chicago to Perrier, as he concluded an offensive and defensive alliance; this is the pipe of peace or war. You have but to speak, and our braves will strike the nations that are your foes. To secure the eastern valley of the Mississippi, it 1736 was
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 5
cky Mountains, and then descended to seek its termination in the Gulf of California. On the Gulf of Mexico, it is certain that France claimed to the Del Norte. At the north-west, where its collision ments far enough to the west to interrupt the chain of communication between Canada and the Gulf of Mexico. He caused, also, the passes in the mountains to be examined; desired to promote settlementsiana was itself esteemed an encroachment on Spanish territory. Every Spanish harbor in the Gulf of Mexico was closed against the vessels of Crozat. It was next attempted to institute commercial rurs resistance, surrendered, the French hoped to extend their power along 1719. May 14. the Gulf of Mexico from the Rio del Norte to the Atlantic. But within forty days the Spaniards recovered Junearded the mouth of the Del Norte as the western limit of Louisiana on See Popple's Map. the Gulf of Mexico; and English geography recognized the claim. But a change had taken place in the fortunes
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