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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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R. Livingston (search for this): chapter 19
p Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was introduced by the tolling of muffled bells; minute-guns were fired, and pennants hoisted at half-staff; or a eulogy was pronounced on liberty, and its knell sounded; and then again
th which was contrary to that of the governor, to maintain the rights of the colony. But Fitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield; had talked of the public spirit in the language of an enemy; had said that the Act must go down; that forty regulars could guard the stamp papers; and that the American conduct would bring from home violent measures and the loss of charters; and he resolved to comply; E. Stiles' Diary. on which Pitkin, Trumbull, and Dyer, truly representing the sentiments of Connecticut, rose with indignation and left the room. The governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic refusal. But every where, either quietly of themselves, or at the instance of the people, amidst shouts and the ringing of bells and the firing of cannon, or as in Virginia, with rage changing into courtesy on the prompt submission of the Stamp master, or as at Charleston, with the upraising of the flag of liberty, surmo
Thomas Fitch (search for this): chapter 19
to carry the Stamp Act punctually into effect. In Connecticut, which, in chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. its assembly, had already voted American taxation by a British parliament to be unprecedented and unconstitutional, Dyer, of the council, entreated Fitch not to take an oath which was contrary to that of the governor, to maintain the rights of the colony. But Fitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield; had talked of the public spiritFitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield; had talked of the public spirit in the language of an enemy; had said that the Act must go down; that forty regulars could guard the stamp papers; and that the American conduct would bring from home violent measures and the loss of charters; and he resolved to comply; E. Stiles' Diary. on which Pitkin, Trumbull, and Dyer, truly representing the sentiments of Connecticut, rose with indignation and left the room. The governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic refusal. But every where, either quietly of themse
765. Nov. General and Solicitor-General, to make examples of some very few, this colony will remain quiet. Others of his letters pointed plainly to John Morin Scott, Robert R. Livingston, and William Livingston, as suitable victims. At the same time, some of the churchmen avowed to one another their longing to see the Archbishop of Canterbury display a little more of the resolution of a Laud or a Sextus Quintus; for what, said they, has the church ever gained by that which the courtesy of England calls prudence? Thomas B. Chandler, 12 Nov. 1765. Yet when Moore, the new governor, arrived, he could do nothing but give way to the popular impulse. He dismantled the fort, and suspended his power to execute the Stamp Act. Sir H. Moore to Conway, 21 Nov. When the assembly came together, it confirmed the doings of its committee at the Congress, and prepared papers analogous to them. In New Jersey, Ogden found himself disavowed by his constituents. The assembly, by a unanimous
gislature was so long prorogued, that it could not join in the application of the Congress; but had there been need of resorting to arms, the whole force of North Carolina was ready to join in protecting the rights of the continent. Gadsden to Garth, Dec. 1765. It was the same throughout the country. Wherever a jealousy was roused, that a stamp officer might exercise his functions, the people were sure to gather about him, and compel him to renew his resignation under oath, or solemnly befoery extensive continent, uttering the sober opinions of all its inhabitants, would be listened to, so that Great Britain and America might once more enjoy chap. XIX.} 1765. Dec. peace, harmony, and the greatest prosperity. Delay made anxiety too intense to be endured. Every moment is tedious, wrote South Carolina to its agent in London: should you have to communicate the good news we wish for, send it to us, if possible, by a messenger swifter than the wind. Gadsden to Garth, Dec. 1765.
Jared Ingersoll (search for this): chapter 19
Colden and all he Oct. royal governors took the oath to carry the Stamp Act punctually into effect. In Connecticut, which, in chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. its assembly, had already voted American taxation by a British parliament to be unprecedented and unconstitutional, Dyer, of the council, entreated Fitch not to take an oath which was contrary to that of the governor, to maintain the rights of the colony. But Fitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield; had talked of the public spirit in the language of an enemy; had said that the Act must go down; that forty regulars could guard the stamp papers; and that the American conduct would bring from home violent measures and the loss of charters; and he resolved to comply; E. Stiles' Diary. on which Pitkin, Trumbull, and Dyer, truly representing the sentiments of Connecticut, rose with indignation and left the room. The governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic
John Morin Scott (search for this): chapter 19
enge rankled in Colden's breast. The lawyers, he wrote to Conway, at a time when the government in England was still bent on enforcing the Stamp Act, R. Jackson to Bernard, 8 Nov. 1765. the lawyers of this place are the authors and conductors of the present sedition. If judges be sent from England, with an able Attorney- chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. General and Solicitor-General, to make examples of some very few, this colony will remain quiet. Others of his letters pointed plainly to John Morin Scott, Robert R. Livingston, and William Livingston, as suitable victims. At the same time, some of the churchmen avowed to one another their longing to see the Archbishop of Canterbury display a little more of the resolution of a Laud or a Sextus Quintus; for what, said they, has the church ever gained by that which the courtesy of England calls prudence? Thomas B. Chandler, 12 Nov. 1765. Yet when Moore, the new governor, arrived, he could do nothing but give way to the popular impul
o countermand all former orders; and chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. not even to receive goods on commission, unless the Stamp Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was introduced by the tolling of muffled bells; minute-guns were fire
Hutchinson (search for this): chapter 19
of the constitution, their minds may, in time, become disaffected. In addition to this state paper, which was the imprint; of the mind of Samuel Adams, Not of Otis. The paper has not the style of Otis, and does not express his opinions. Besides; he was absent from Boston from the delivery of Bernard's speech till after the reply was made, performing his duty at New-York, as a member of Congress. The paper has the style of S. Adams, and expresses his sentiments exactly. Moreover, Hutchinson names him. Bernard's letters point to him, without naming him. The lead of the committee was Samuel Dexter, who had the greatest regard for Samuel Adams. J. Adams: Works, II. 163, 181. and had the vigor and polished elegance of his style, the house adopted the best, and the best digested series of resolves, prepared by him, to ascertain the just rights of the province, which the preamble said had been lately drawn into question by the British parliament. The answer of the house was reg
James Delancy (search for this): chapter 19
und themselves to send no new orders for goods or merchandise; to countermand all former orders; and chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. not even to receive goods on commission, unless the Stamp Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was
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