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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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. The Yankees will find the optima spolia of Vicksburg not unmixed with the rich prize of death. Corinth has recently been reinforced by infantry and light artillery. Grienson has pompously gone there to command the cavalry forces, and information has been received that preparations are being made for a raid upon an extensive scale. A commander with ordinary ability, permission to act at discretion, and a proper spirit, could, with such soldiers as there are in the commands of Bateau, Inge, Boyle, Ham, &c., and the well-managed artillery of Owens and Barksdale, ambuscade any such force of marauders, separate them, and whip them by detail.--The material is here — have we the leader? It is a matter worthy the attention of Gen. Johnston. Vast supplies for his army depend upon the protection of North Mississippi, and its protection merely demands an able and energetic cavalry officer. The distributing post-office at Jackson, Miss, having been discontinued, letters to per
th the rich prize of death. Corinth has recently been reinforced by infantry and light artillery. Grienson has pompously gone there to command the cavalry forces, and information has been received that preparations are being made for a raid upon an extensive scale. A commander with ordinary ability, permission to act at discretion, and a proper spirit, could, with such soldiers as there are in the commands of Bateau, Inge, Boyle, Ham, &c., and the well-managed artillery of Owens and Barksdale, ambuscade any such force of marauders, separate them, and whip them by detail.--The material is here — have we the leader? It is a matter worthy the attention of Gen. Johnston. Vast supplies for his army depend upon the protection of North Mississippi, and its protection merely demands an able and energetic cavalry officer. The distributing post-office at Jackson, Miss, having been discontinued, letters to persons in Gen. Johnston's army will save several days by being addresse
August 16th (search for this): article 10
Affairs in Mississippi--the negro Retaliation Question. A letter in the Atlanta (Ga.) Appeal dated at Morion, Miss., August 16th, gives the following interesting account of the recent successful fight made by Col. Logan near Port Hudson. The writer says: It was chiefly an artillery and cavalry action, lasting about two hours, between eight hundred men on each side, commanded respectively by Colonel Logan and General Andrews. Logan, it is true, dismounted some of his men, but a cavalryman dismounted is still a cavalryman. If the enemy were not surprised, Logan charged on them with such impetuosity as to give the affair all the character of a surprise to the blue coats. The hottest of the action occurred in the immediate vicinity of that literary institution, Centenary College, whose classic walls bear the marks of grape, shrapnel, and Minnie balls. Around this building the enemy rallied, and it is said the negroes in arms with the enemy fought for awhile with spirit, co
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