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ty is with us, and we feel sure that we have the Almighty with us. About the middle of March, General McClellan began his movement against Richmond, by a change of base from before Washington to the James River. It was not until the middle of April that the Army of the Potomac was ready to advance. Yorktown was captured April 26; and the battle of Williamsburg was fought May 5, in which Hooker's brigade bore a conspicuous part, and the Massachusetts First and Eleventh Regiments suffered selected president; Z. K. Pangborn, vice-president; Charles F. Macdonald, surgeon and treasurer; and A. B. Johnson, secretary. This society appointed Miss Lander, of Salem, to distribute proper articles for the sick and wounded. Before the end of April, it was in successful operation. Upon the arrival of our Eighth Regiment at Washington, Lieutenant Herrick, of the Beverly company, whose foot was severely wounded by the accidental discharge of a musket in the rotunda of the Capitol, was taken
March 4th (search for this): chapter 6
d gladly concur in. The flags were subsequently presented to the House, and were displayed there until the end of the session. March 3.—The Governor writes to Right Rev. Bishop Fitzpatrick that he had no power to order private McDonald's discharge: that rests alone with the Federal authorities. I will, however, be happy to unite with you in presenting to the Secretary of War, or the General-in-chief of the army, any statement of reasons for requesting the discharge which is desired. March 4.—The Governor writes to Colonel Kurtz, Twenty-third Regiment, at Newbern, N. C.,— I wish to learn the place of burial of James H. Boutell, late private in Co. K, Twenty-third Regiment. He died in the service, and is supposed to have been buried at Hatteras; also, the best means for his friends to get his remains to Massachusetts. His wife, Mrs. Abbie P. Boutell, resides in Wrentham. March 9.—The Governor writes to Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War,— I beg leave to report to
k of chance of omission by transmission of a check by mail, and secured payment directly to the family at home. The payments to the soldiers, from the General Government, were to be made at or near the close of every two months, commencing with January. But, owing to sudden or hazardous movements and other causes, these payments were often delayed, and both the men and their families were much distressed. To remedy this evil,—in part, at least,—and secure, if possible, the retention of a larshington at this time that the troops raised by General Butler in Massachusetts were placed in the charge of the Governor, and the irregular and illegal manner of raising regiments ended; and the Department of New England was discontinued. In January and February, persons representing themselves recruiting officers for a Maryland regiment came to Boston, and, by their misrepresentations of large pay and little service, induced some thirty or forty men to enlist, and go with them to Baltimor
March 5th (search for this): chapter 6
ies of men in the navy was stricken out. Pending the consideration of other amendments, the Senate adjourned. March 1. In the Senate.—The bill concerning State aid, &c., was amended, and passed to be engrossed. March 3. In the Senate.—Mr. Northend, of Essex, announced the death of Brigadier-General Frederick W. Lander, and delivered a short but touching eulogy upon his life and character. He also introduced a joint resolution in honor of the deceased, which was passed unanimously. March 5. In the House.—A message was received from the Governor concerning three rebel flags, which had been captured by the Massachusetts regiments in the battle at Roanoke Island, N. C. A resolution was adopted to have the flags placed in the House of Representatives during the remainder of the session. Patriotic speeches were made by Mr. Field, of Stockbridge, and by the Speaker of the House, Colonel Bullock. March 6. In the House.—The Senate bill granting State aid to the families of volu
been of very cordial sympathy with you, under the infliction of so wanton, unprovoked, and unmerited an attack. On the 30th of January, the Governor was suddenly called to Washington, and was absent about ten days. It was while in Washington at this time that the troops raised by General Butler in Massachusetts were placed in the charge of the Governor, and the irregular and illegal manner of raising regiments ended; and the Department of New England was discontinued. In January and February, persons representing themselves recruiting officers for a Maryland regiment came to Boston, and, by their misrepresentations of large pay and little service, induced some thirty or forty men to enlist, and go with them to Baltimore. Upon arriving there, they found how miserably they had been imposed upon. The promises held out were delusive, and the men whom they had trusted were cheats. They were left without money to support themselves; and many letters were received by the Governor
March 6th (search for this): chapter 6
joint resolution in honor of the deceased, which was passed unanimously. March 5. In the House.—A message was received from the Governor concerning three rebel flags, which had been captured by the Massachusetts regiments in the battle at Roanoke Island, N. C. A resolution was adopted to have the flags placed in the House of Representatives during the remainder of the session. Patriotic speeches were made by Mr. Field, of Stockbridge, and by the Speaker of the House, Colonel Bullock. March 6. In the House.—The Senate bill granting State aid to the families of volunteers was discussed during the greater part of the day, and was passed to a third reading, yeas 100, nays 73. Nothing further of material interest to the volunteers, or in relation to the war, was considered during the session. The acts passed by the extra session the year before left little more to be done for the soldiers. The session continued until the 30th of May, when both Houses were prorogued, having p
July 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ery thing within his reach; and I was pleased at the high commendation he bestowed upon Colonels Stevenson, Amory, and Upton, in especial. I was the bearer of a recommendation from him to the Secretary of war, that Colonels Amory and Stevenson should be appointed brigadier-generals. He desired me to solicit your recommendation for them also. During the early part of the year 1862, three allotment commissioners were appointed by the President, as provided by acts of Congress, passed July 22, 1861, and Dec. 24, 1861. These acts provided,— First, for the transmission, free of expense, of portions of the soldiers' pay to their families or friends, as had been done under the half-pay system in the navy. Second, for the appointment, by the President, for each State which chose to adopt this system, of three commissioners, without pay, who should visit the troops, and invite each soldier to avail himself of this opportunity. In February, 1862, President Lincoln, upon the reco
August 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
irty companies of infantry, twenty of which were to compose two regiments,—the Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth,—six for a battalion to garrison Fort Warren, and four to complete the organization of the Thirty-second Regiment. The Thirty-third regiment was recruited at Lynnfield, and left the State to join the Army of the Potomac, Aug. 14, 1862. The Thirty-fourth Regiment was recruited at Camp John E. Wool, on the Agricultural Fair Grounds in Worcester. It left the State for Washington, Aug. 15, 1862. The other ten companies were recruited in a few weeks, and assigned to duty. The Massachusetts regiments and batteries in the spring of 1862, and previous to the commencement of the campaign in North Carolina under Burnside, and in Virginia under General McClellan, were stationed as follows: The First, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-second, Twenty-ninth, and Thirty-second Regiments of Infantry, the First, Third, and F
March 13th (search for this): chapter 6
was placed in charge of them, with full power to provide for their wants, and procure transportation to their several homes. They reached Baltimore on the evening of the 9th of March. On arriving at New York, the wounded soldiers were welcomed by Colonel Frank E. Howe, our Massachusetts agent, and amply supplied with whatever was necessary for their wants. The Massachusetts men, seventy-one in number, were at once forwarded by rail, and reached their homes or hospitals before the thirteenth day of March. At the New-York and New-Haven depot, in New-York City, a cruel and unjustifiable detention occurred in the embarkation of these wounded men, which elicited some very sharp criticisms in the loyal papers of that day, and in letters of Dr. Hitchcock and Colonel Frank E. Howe to Governor Andrew. Colonel Howe writes to the Governor, from New York, March 11, Received telegram from Dr. Hitchcock at two o'clock at night, got up immediately, did all I could for him and his poor men. Dr
August 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
iments in the field, and forwarded to their several destinations. On the 28th day of May, an order was received from the President of the United States for thirty companies of infantry, twenty of which were to compose two regiments,—the Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth,—six for a battalion to garrison Fort Warren, and four to complete the organization of the Thirty-second Regiment. The Thirty-third regiment was recruited at Lynnfield, and left the State to join the Army of the Potomac, Aug. 14, 1862. The Thirty-fourth Regiment was recruited at Camp John E. Wool, on the Agricultural Fair Grounds in Worcester. It left the State for Washington, Aug. 15, 1862. The other ten companies were recruited in a few weeks, and assigned to duty. The Massachusetts regiments and batteries in the spring of 1862, and previous to the commencement of the campaign in North Carolina under Burnside, and in Virginia under General McClellan, were stationed as follows: The First, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth,
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