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crossed a force, amounting to about one army corps, to the south side of the Rappahannock, on a pontoon-bridge laid down near the mouth of Deep Run. General Hill disposed his command to resist their advance, but as they seemed intended for the purpose of observation rather than attack, the movements in progress were not arrested. The forces of Longstreet and Ewell reached Culpeper Court-House by the eighth, at which point the cavalry, under General Stuart, was also concentrated. On the ninth a large force of Federal cavalry, strongly supported by infantry, crossed the Rappahannock at Beverly's and Kelly's Fords, and attacked General Stuart. A severe engagement ensued, continuing from early in the morning until late in the afternoon, when the enemy was forced to recross the river with heavy loss, leaving four hundred prisoners, three pieces of artillery and several colors in our hands. General Jenkins, with his cavalry brigade, had been ordered to advance toward Winchester to
July 22nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
rom the Directory office. Messrs. Stille, Struthers, Hazlehurst, Dullus, Beitler, and Tracy, from Philadelphia, and Messrs. Hosford, Myers, and Braman, from New-York, assisted in this labor, as well as at the lodge, and in attending to special cases. The duty of visiting the confederate hospitals was assigned to Dr. Gordon Winslow, who reported to me soon after I arrived. The following communication, addressed by him to me, will give briefly the result of his inquiries: Gettysburgh, July 22, 1863. sir: Agreeably to your instructions, I have inspected the several confederate hospitals in the vicinity of Gettysburgh, and have indicated, on the accompanying map, the locality, division, general who was in command, surgeon in charge, and number of wounded. It appears that the aggregate of wounded, at the time of my visits, was five thousand four hundred and fifty-two, occupying some twenty-four (24) separate camps, over an area of some twelve miles. The wounds, in a large propor
Iii. The rear of a great army.two Taverns P. O., Pa., July 1. Our little party broke up unceremoniously. Both my co four in the morning.Agate. Ii. The repulse on Wednesday, First July. Field of battle, near Gettysburgh, July 2. occupy Gettysburgh. On reaching that place, on the first day of July, General Reynolds found Buford's cavalry warmly engag enemy in advance of Gettysburgh, on the morning of the first of July. Driving back these troops to within a short distance irst pitched engagement of the contending forces, on the first July, reached us the following morning. A freight car (No. 8d, Tuesday, P. M., June thirtieth. Wednesday morning, July first, and first day of the battle, I was informed, while at Gfirst day of the battle, I was informed, while at General Meade's headquarters, by an orderly just arrived from this place, (Gettysburgh,) that an attack and a battle was expec These buildings contained the wounded of the battle of July first. The number estimated, including those in private house
ng.Agate. Ii. The repulse on Wednesday, First July. Field of battle, near Gettysburgh, July 2. To the front. We were in the saddle this morning a little after daybreak. The army was c to the wounded, to whom they were distributed under fire, during the battles of Gettysburgh, July second and third, by Mr. Hoag, cannot be expressed in words, and the receipted requisitions of the sient evidence of the utility of being prepared for such emergencies. On Saturday, July fourth, two wagons reported to me from Washington, being accompanied by Dr. Alexander McDonald, (Sanitary Insrd and Twelfth corps arrived during the afternoon, but too late to enter into battle. Thursday, July second, and second day of the battle. The Second corps arrived by the Taneytown road, below Cesecond day of the battle. The Second corps arrived by the Taneytown road, below Cemetery Hill, at day-break. The Fifth corps arrived two miles from town, on the Baltimore pike, about ten A. M. One division of the Sixth corps on the same pike from Westminster, at two P. M. The b
en advantage of by the enemy, who, during the absence of Geary's division of the Twelfth corps, advanced and occupied part of the line. On the morning of the third July, General Geary having returned during the night, attacked at early dawn the enemy and succeeded in driving him back and reoccupying his former position. A spiroag and Bush. The benefits afforded by these supplies to the wounded, to whom they were distributed under fire, during the battles of Gettysburgh, July second and third, by Mr. Hoag, cannot be expressed in words, and the receipted requisitions of the surgeons who employed these stores on that occasion, are sufficient evidence of ttminster, leaving Washington in the night, in charge of Mr. S. Bacon. Mr. Hovey followed the next morning in passenger train, and reached Westminster about noon July third. Owing to a delay at Baltimore of the government freight train, the car was thirty hours en route. On Sunday, the fifth July, another car, (No. 1499,) load
May it be forever. Agate. Gazette office, July 8. Major-General Meade's report. headquarters army of the Potomac, October 1, 1863. General: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the operations of this army during the month of July, including details of the battle of Gettysburgh, which have been delayed by failure to receive the reports of the several corps and division commanders, who were severely wounded in battle. On the twenty-eighth of June I received orders from thsputed so successfully as to enable the rear-guard to withdraw by way of Strasburgh, the confederate army retiring to the Rapid-Ann. Position was taken with this army on the line of the Rappahannock, and the campaign terminated about the close of July. The result of the campaign may be briefly stated in the defeat of the enemy at Gettysburgh, their compulsory evacuation of Pennsylvania and Maryland, and withdrawal from the upper valley of the Shenandoah, and the capture of three guns, forty-
marched to the same place. They were followed on the fourth and fifth by Ewell's corps, leaving that of A. P. Hill to occupy our lines at Fredericksburgh. The march of these troops having been discovered by the enemy on the afternoon of the fifth, and the following day he crossed a force, amounting to about one army corps, to the south side of the Rappahannock, on a pontoon-bridge laid down near the mouth of Deep Run. General Hill disposed his command to resist their advance, but as they d second days' engagements were left behind. Little progress was made that night, owing to a severe storm, which greatly embarrassed our movements. The rear of the column did not leave its position near Gettysburgh until after daylight on the fifth. The march was continued during that day without interruption by the enemy, except an unimportant demonstration upon our rear in the afternoon, when near Fairfield, which was easily checked. Part of our train moved by the road through Fairfie
he Sixth corps, maintained his position and inflicted very severe losses on the enemy. With this exception, our lines remained undisturbed till one P. M. on the third, when the enemy opened from over one hundred and twenty-five guns, playing upon our centre and left. This cannonade continued for over two hours, when, our guns f refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was, on the third, sent out on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburgh road, where good service was rendered in assaulting the enemy's line and occupying his attention. At the same in the mean time had strengthened his line with earthworks. The morning was occupied in necessary preparations, and the battle recommenced in the afternoon of the third, and raged with great violence until sunset. Our troops succeeded in entering the advanced works of the enemy, and getting possession of some of his batteries; bu
rt had not failed — we were just one train too late and were cut off from the army! There was nothing for it but to wait; and so — ill-satisfied with this Getting a good ready --back to Washington. Ii. Off.Frederick, Md., Tuesday evening, June 30. Washington was again like a city besieged, as after Bull Run. All night long, troops were marching; orderlies with clanking sabres clattering along the streets; trains of wagons grinding over the bouldered avenue; commissaries were hurryings: Monday morning, June twenty-ninth. Mr. Hoag and myself left Frederick with two wagon loads, in connection with the train of the Twelfth corps, by order of General Williams to Dr. Steiner. Reached Taneytown, Maryland, Tuesday, P. M., June thirtieth. Wednesday morning, July first, and first day of the battle, I was informed, while at General Meade's headquarters, by an orderly just arrived from this place, (Gettysburgh,) that an attack and a battle was expected here that day, as the c
y wounded. This terminated the battle, the enemy retiring to his lines, leaving the field strewed with his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburgh, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was, on the third, sent out on our extreme left, onrough the mountain pass, only two divisions of Hill's corps crossed the mountain on the thirtieth. Earry on Wednesday Hill's remaining division (Anderson's) and Longstreet's corps moved on after Hill's advance. At ten o'clock A. M. on the first instant, Heth's division being ahead, encountered the enemy's advance line — the Eleventh corps--about three miles west of Gettysburgh. Here a sharp en. gagement began, our men steadily advancing and driving the enemy before them to the town and to
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