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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
els, and a fleet of magnificent Southern steamboats, steamed up the Mississippi, and had run far up the Yazoo River, and were then under the orders of Commodore Lynch. The enemy had detached three of, their finest gunboats from the fleet at Milliken's Bend, to watch the mouth of the Yazoo; and to be ready for any emergency, they kept up steam night and day. So much for the Yazoo at present, but I shall have more to tell you by and by. The Federal fleet maintained a hot and vigorous cannonid. day. Their troops were landed from transports, but never came within view. From scouts, who volunteered as spies, we ascertained that they had seized hundreds of negroes in that part of Louisiana, and were actually digging a canal from Milliken's Bend across the peninsula, which, it was hoped, would divert the waters of the river from its proper bed, and leave Vicksburgh Sigh and dry as an inland city! The idea was a bold one, and originated with General Pope, who, not able to pass Islan
New Madrid, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
From scouts, who volunteered as spies, we ascertained that they had seized hundreds of negroes in that part of Louisiana, and were actually digging a canal from Milliken's Bend across the peninsula, which, it was hoped, would divert the waters of the river from its proper bed, and leave Vicksburgh Sigh and dry as an inland city! The idea was a bold one, and originated with General Pope, who, not able to pass Island no.10 some months before, dug a canal across a small peninsula near New-Madrid, in Missouri, and got safely in the rear of the island, and captured it. The present undertaking, however, did not promise like results; for the stream was strong, and would not be diverted. Hundreds of men, both whites and blacks, sank and died under the labor of cutting this canal, before the attempt was discontinued. And still the bombardment progressed. Thousands of shell, round shot, and other missiles were hurled at our devoted city; but, strange to say, except in some half-dozen ins
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
s) from the fevers, chills, and agues, which it caused in ancient times. In a direct line north from Vicksburgh, it is not more than twelve miles distant; so that it formed an admirable protection to our right flank, and in case of attack, Paynes's Bluff, some miles from the mouth, was well fortified and mounted, while yet farther above was moored an enormous raft made of huge rough logs, and so constructed that it could be opened from above, but not below. A few miles still beyond (near Yazoo City) Commodore Lynch had improvised a ship-yard, and was busy in reconstructing Various boats for river services You smile, perhaps, but let me explain, and your sarcasm may change into admiration for the indefatigable industry of those engaged there. In the first place, although several small steam sea-vessels, and a magnificent fleet of river passenger and freight boats had escaped from New-Orleans, and were far inland, up the Yazoo, they were not safe. Naval officers knew the enemy wo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
o seized Memphis, sunk our little improvised fleet of gunboats there, after a noble fight, in which we inflicted considerable loss; had pushed along the Charleston and Mississippi Railroad, the west end of which they occupied; and had camped about three miles from Corinth. This was a startling position for us truly! Our main railroad communication with Richmond, via Chattanooga, in the enemy's possession, and we obliged to travel many hundred miles round by way of Mobile, Alabama, and Georgia, to keep the communication open! As there are but two lines of railroad, both had been taxed to the utmost before this disaster. What could we do with but one, while the enemy had several outlets by land and river communication as well for advance as supplies? To add to our misfortunes, Corinth was a wretched site for a camp, utterly destitute of water, good or bad, and what little could be obtained was scooped up from the sand, or from pools fed by occasional rains. You are acquainted
Don Carlos Buell (search for this): chapter 40
Movements of Beauregard's army in Mississippi, after the battle of Shiloh our defences at Corinth General Halleck takes command of the combined armies of Buell and Grant, and follows on to Corinth both armies intrench magnitude of the Federal works Beauregard suddenly retreats to Tullahoma policy of his retreat the First and second day; of the first day's victory, of Albert Sydney Johnston's death; and of our reverse and retreat on the second day, before the combined armies of Buell and Grant. I also informed you that the retreat was covered by General Breckinridge, with his Kentuckians, and of the admirable manner in which he performed that and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learned that the tremendous forces of Grant and Buell, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every thing, carr
est, says: In Monroe County, Missouri, near the Salt River railway bridge, as Mr. Lasley and family were returning from church, together with a party of young ladies ough finding the grounds guarded, they advanced towards their residence, when Mr. Lasley was ordered to get down and go to Palmyra. He replied, that they must permitlted grossly by the officer commanding, without explanation of any kind; and Mrs. Lasley, thinking they were going to be shot, rushed towards her husband; but Mr. LaMr. Lasley and young Price fell dead at the one moment, and from the same volley. Young Ridgeway ran to the woods, but was pursued and shot. Mr. Lasley and young RidgewayMr. Lasley and young Ridgeway had both taken the oath of allegiance, and were under heavy bonds. Before this crime was committed the soldiery had taken possession of Mr. Lasley's house, and helpMr. Lasley's house, and helped themselves to every thing they needed, had forced the old cook to prepare dinner for them, and destroyed many articles of furniture, etc. These are but mild insta
d of Van Dorn, sent to defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advancing up from the Gulf, and Commodore Foote's squadron ofve: We had scarcely arrived at Tullahoma ere it was known that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippi, ndant, asking for the surrender of Vicksburgh, in the name of Commodore Farragut, United States Navy. The answer was instant, Mississippians the bluffs. A day or two after an answer had been returned to Farragut, one of his iron-clads was signalled from below; and soon after apred by us off the Gulf Coast, and taken into New-Orleans; but when Farragut took that city, this, with some three or four other sea-vessels, aluff batteries were contending with most of the fleet, several of Farragut's squadron ran past, and opened with an awful roar upon the-Arkans noise was maintained on both sides, and it was once supposed that Farragut's boats would grapple with the Arkansas and take her; but such was
ma policy of his retreat the Federals do not follow part of our force detached from Beauregard, and, under command of Van Dorn, sent to defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advancing up from the Gulf, and Commodore Foote's squh I was glad to hear that Price, with a division of Missourians, had crossed the Mississippi, and formed a junction with Van Dorn and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learnt that a land force would cooperate with the gunboats, our brigade was sent to assist in the defence of the stronghold. Van Dorn was appointed to command the post, and did every thing in his power to place the city in a good posture for defence. er securing all the letters and despatches of the fleet. I glean this from Headquarters; the telegram came an hour ago. Van Dorn says the enemy admit a great loss among them from various causes, and are afraid the Arkansas may run down to New-Orlean
house, and get a thicker coat, as he would be absent all night. This was not allowed; but they placed him and James Price (young son of a poor widow) and young Ridgeway (only son of aged parents) in front of the Federal lines. They were then insulted grossly by the officer commanding, without explanation of any kind; and Mrs. Ley, thinking they were going to be shot, rushed towards her husband; but Mr. Lasley and young Price fell dead at the one moment, and from the same volley. Young Ridgeway ran to the woods, but was pursued and shot. Mr. Lasley and young Ridgeway had both taken the oath of allegiance, and were under heavy bonds. Before this crime Ridgeway had both taken the oath of allegiance, and were under heavy bonds. Before this crime was committed the soldiery had taken possession of Mr. Lasley's house, and helped themselves to every thing they needed, had forced the old cook to prepare dinner for them, and destroyed many articles of furniture, etc. These are but mild instances of what the Federal soldiery have done, in various places, to harmless citizens. D
vements of Beauregard's army in Mississippi, after the battle of Shiloh our defences at Corinth General Halleck takes command of the combined armies of Buell and Grant, and follows on to Corinth both armies intrench magnitude of the Federal works Beauregard suddenly retreats to Tullahoma policy of his retreat the Federals doecond day; of the first day's victory, of Albert Sydney Johnston's death; and of our reverse and retreat on the second day, before the combined armies of Buell and Grant. I also informed you that the retreat was covered by General Breckinridge, with his Kentuckians, and of the admirable manner in which he performed that difficult h Van Dorn and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learned that the tremendous forces of Grant and Buell, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every t
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