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apter 24: echo of Seven days, North and South. Confederates hopeful, but not overconfident the cost to the North McClellan sacrificed General Pope and his methods he finds Jackson at Cedar Mountain a glance trans Allegheny well conceiveved himself a tactician in anything but name; and as part of its policy the northern government shamelessly sacrificed McClellan, while it could not but unhesitatingly acknowledge his merit. Unlike the South, the North throughout the whole war , Alexandria and Fredericksburg were mobilized and strengthened; and the baton of command was wrenched from the hand of McClellan to be placed in that of Major-General John Pope! The history of this new popular hero, to this time, may be summed being thus better able to concentrate his strength, he left only enough troops around Richmond to delay any advance of McClellan from the Peninsula; and, before the end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old d
hen followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere diversion; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. Hardee's and Buckner's divisions were sent to Perryville; and they with Cheatham's — who joined them by a forced marchbore the brunt of the battle of Perryville on the 8th of October. Notwithstanding the great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys prevailed against the veterans of Buell's army, under General n was illumined by flashes of brilliance, dash and enduring courage, surpassed by no theater of the war. Disastrous as it was in result, it fixed more firmly than ever the high reputation of Kirby Smith; it wreathed the names of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to Joseph Wheeler a record that the people of that country will long remember. In the events first preceding the disaster, too, as well as in his independent raid during July, John H. Morgan had added a
oward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgianati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly enfederates were in full march for the enemy; that any moment might bring news of the crushing of Buell before re-enforcements, or fresh supplies, could reach him. Great was the disappointment, therefvy loss upon both sides, but not productive of any result; for, after the victory, Bragg allowed Buell to escape from his front and retire at his will toward the Ohio. That a Confederate army, at lethe great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys prevailed against the veterans of Buell's army, under General G. W. Thomas. They gained a decided advantage over three times their numb
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 25
y free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissar gunboats, and her warehouses bursting with commissary and ordnance stores. When the news of Smith's triumphant march to the very gates of Cincinnati reached Richmond, it was universally believedrn troops from before Cincinnati; and that all action of Bragg's forces would be postponed until Smith's junction with him. Intense anxiety reigned at the Capital, enlivened only by the fitful re on the 17th of September, but it was not until the 4th of the next month that the junction with Smith was effected at Frankfort. Then followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere he war. Disastrous as it was in result, it fixed more firmly than ever the high reputation of Kirby Smith; it wreathed the names of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to
Pierre G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 25
le believed that General Bragg was a pet-if not a creature of Mr, Davis; and that he was thrust into a position that others deserved far more, when he succeeded Beauregard in command of the army of the West. The latter officer had, after the evacuation of Corinth, been compelled to retire by ill health; and Bragg was soon sentple that Kentucky was to be the theater of active operations, and that a programme of aggression-rather than of defense — was to be carried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening CincinnGeneral Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissariat-was pushed forward toward the Ohio. On the 29th of August-while our victorious cannon were still ec
McClernand (search for this): chapter 25
ssion of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgia and cutting through to the seaboard; and to push the army under Grant down through Mississippi to the Gulf. These movements would not only weaken the Confederacy, by diverting so many men, ill to be spared, to watch the various columns; but would, moreover, wrest from it the great grain-producing and cattle-grazing sections from which the armies were mainly fed. Simultaneously with these a heavy force was to be massed under McClernand in Ohio, to sweep down the Mississippi; while the weak show of Confederate force in the states west of the river was to be crushed before it could make head. Such was the Federal programme; well conceived and backed by every appliance of means, men and material. To meet it we had but a small numerical force to defend an extensive and varied tract; and at the Capital grave fears began to prevail that the overpowering numbers and points of attack would crush the little armies we could m
to concealed its uglier features, and commenced a systematic course of pillage and petty plundering-backed by a series of curiously bombastic and windy orders. Calmly to read these wonderful effusions-dated from Headquarters in the saddle --by the light of his real deeds, one could only conceive that General Pope coveted that niche in history filled by Thackeray's O'Grady Gahagan; and that much of his reading had been confined to the pleasant rambles of Gulliver and the doughty deeds of Trenck and Munchausen. To sober second thought, the sole reason for his advancement might seem his wonderful power as a braggart. He blustered and bragged until the North was bullied into admiration; and his sounding boasts that he had only seen the backs of his enemies, and that he had gone to look for the rebel, Jackson --were really taken to mean what they said. When Pope did at last find the rebel, Jackson, the hopeful public over the Potomac began to believe that their truculent pet migh
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 25
that he had gone to look for the rebel, Jackson --were really taken to mean what they said. When Pope did at last find the rebel, Jackson, the hopeful public over the Potomac began to believe that their truculent pet might have simply paraphrased Falstaff, and cried- Lying and thieving have blown me up like a bladder! For Jackson gave the bladder a single prick, and lo! it collapsed. Resting his wearied and shattered troops only long enough to get them again into fighting trim, General Lee prepared to check the third great advance upon Manassas. Working on the inner line and being thus better able to concentrate his strength, he left only enough troops around Richmond to delay any advance of McClellan from the Peninsula; and, before the end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old division under General Charles S. Winder, in all about 10,000 men — to frustrate the flatulent designs of the gong-sounding commander, whose Chinese warfare w
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 25
ability that he possessed. The painful result of his command was later emphasized by the pessimists, to justify their incredulity as to his executive powers. Besides, many people believed that General Bragg was a pet-if not a creature of Mr, Davis; and that he was thrust into a position that others deserved far more, when he succeeded Beauregard in command of the army of the West. The latter officer had, after the evacuation of Corinth, been compelled to retire by ill health; and Bragg people when the full news of the Kentucky campaign reached them. Unpopular as the name of Bragg had been before, it was now mentioned often with execration; and the reverses of his universally-condemned favorite reacted upon the popularity of Mr. Davis as well. Without understanding the details of the campaign, and with no patience to listen to the excuses of his few defenders, the public voice was unanimous in denunciation of the plan and conduct of the whole movement; and it arraigned the
the next month that the junction with Smith was effected at Frankfort. Then followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere diversion; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. Hardee's and Buckner's divisions were sent to Perryville; and they with Cheatham's — who joined them by a forced marchbore the brunt of the battle of Perryville on the 8th of October. Notwithstanding the great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefy campaign was illumined by flashes of brilliance, dash and enduring courage, surpassed by no theater of the war. Disastrous as it was in result, it fixed more firmly than ever the high reputation of Kirby Smith; it wreathed the names of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to Joseph Wheeler a record that the people of that country will long remember. In the events first preceding the disaster, too, as well as in his independent raid during July, John H. Morgan ha
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