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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
dan would have succeeded in crossing the James River, and cutting the Danville Railroad, which would have deprived Lee's army of supplies. The freshet rendered his pontoon bridge too short, etc. This may be claimed as a direct interposition of Providence, at a time when we were fasting, praying, etc., in accordance with the recommendation of the government. March 17 Bright and cool. A violent southeast gale prevailed last evening, with rain. Of course we have no news in the papers from him dear. But pontoon bridges were sent up the Danville Road yesterday and to-day, in anticipation, beyond the bridges to be destroyed. March 30 Raining rapidly, and warm. Again the sudden change of weather may be an interposition of Providence to defeat the effort of the enemy to destroy Gen. Lee's communications with his Southern depots of supplies. I hope so, for faith in man is growing weaker. Our loss in the affair of the 25th instant was heavy, and is now admitted to be a d
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
pus. The Senate will concur probably. Also the President's suggestion amending the Conscript act has been passed. The President has the reins now, and Congress will be more obedient; but can they save this city? Advertisements for recruiting negro troops are in the papers this morning. It is rumored that Sheridan has crossed the Chickahominy and got off without hinderance. If this be so, Gen. Lee will be criticised. One P. M. It is ascertained that Sheridan has withdrawn to the York River, and abandoned any attempt on Richmond. And it is supposed by high military authority that but for the providential freshet, Sheridan would have succeeded in crossing the James River, and cutting the Danville Railroad, which would have deprived Lee's army of supplies. The freshet rendered his pontoon bridge too short, etc. This may be claimed as a direct interposition of Providence, at a time when we were fasting, praying, etc., in accordance with the recommendation of the government.
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
he communication is sent to Washington, D. C., and thence forwarded by Mr. Seward to Lieut.-Gen. Grant, who sends it by flag of truce to Gen. Lee. Great Britain gives us a kick while the Federal generals are pounding us. The enemy have Fayetteville, N. C. Hardee and Hampton crossed the Cape Fear on the 11th inst. Sherman's army was then within 7 miles of Fayetteville. Bragg, after his fight near Kinston, had to fall back, his rear and right wing being threatened by heavy forces of the enemFayetteville. Bragg, after his fight near Kinston, had to fall back, his rear and right wing being threatened by heavy forces of the enemy coming up from Wilmington. Some of Sheridan's force did cross the James, but retired to the north side. So telegraphs Gen. Lee. March 15 Warm and cloudy. My cabbages coming up in the garden. The papers contain no war news whatever, yet there is great activity in the army. Sheridan's column is said to be at Ashland, and Grant is reported to be sending swarms of troops to the north side of the river, below, in countless thousands. The President's message, for the completio
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
ct of retaliatory executions, it is mentioned by the former that the City of Columbia, S. C. was burned by the latter. Dispatches this morning inform us of some little successes-Hampton over Kilpatrick in the South, and Rosser over a body of the enemy at Harrisonburg, in the North. Some 1500 prisoners, paroled, arrived this morning-making some 10,000 in the last fortnight. I fear there will soon be a great scarcity of arms, when the negroes are drilled, etc. Mrs. Hobson, of Goochland County, a relative of my wife, has offered a home to my eldest daughter Anne. Mr. H. is wealthy, and his mansion is magnificent. It is lighted with gas, made on the plantation. I am often called upon to lend a copy of the Wild Western scenes. My copy is lost. I learn that new editions of my works are published in the United States, where the stereotype plates were deposited. Here, as in old times in the North, the publishers prefer to issue publications upon which they pay no copyrigh
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
30,000. But he is now running after teams to save his tobacco-he a speculator! A letter was received yesterday from--, Selma accusing the Assistant Secretary of War, Judge Campbell, his brother-in-law, Judge Goldthwait, and Judge Parsons, of Alabama, with disloyalty, and says Judge C. is about to issue passports for delegates to go to the Chicago Convention, soon to assemble, etc. etc. He says Judge C. is the Fouche of the South. The letter is dated August 23d, 1864, and the President nowlorable results. The government would soon make its escape — if it could. Mrs. Davis, however, soonest informed of our condition, got away in time. Dispatches from Generalissimo Lee inform the Secretary that large expeditions are on foot in Alabama, Mississippi, etc., and that Thomas's army is rapidly advancing upon Virginia from East Tennessee, while no general has yet been designated to command our troops. The papers say nothing of the flank movement commenced yesterday by Grant. Th
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
as we have had a few days of wind and sunshine, the surface of the earth is becoming practicable for military operations. I heard no news at the department; but the belief prevails that Raleigh has fallen, or must speedily fall, and that Richmond is in danger — a danger increasing daily. Thousands of non-combatants and families, falling weekly within the power of Sherman's army, have succumbed to circumstances and perforce submitted. I suppose most of those remaining in Savannah, Charleston, Wilmington, etd. have taken the oath of allegiance to the United States; and I hear of no censures upon them for doing so. Whether they will be permitted long to enjoy their property — not their slaves, of course — will depend upon the policy adopted at Washington. If it be confiscated, the war will certainly continue for years, even under the direction of President Davis, who is now quite unpopular. If a contrary course be pursued, the struggle may be more speedily terminated — perhap
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
was then within 7 miles of Fayetteville. Bragg, after his fight near Kinston, had to fall back, his rear and right wing being threatened by heavy forces of the enemy coming up from Wilmington. Some of Sheridan's force did cross the James, but retired to the north side. So telegraphs Gen. Lee. March 15 Warm and cloudy. My cabbages coming up in the garden. The papers contain no war news whatever, yet there is great activity in the army. Sheridan's column is said to be at Ashland, and Grant is reported to be sending swarms of troops to the north side of the river, below, in countless thousands. The President's message, for the completion of which Congress was desired to remain, has been sent in. I will preserve this splendidly exordiumed and most extraordinary document. It is a great legal triumph, achieved by the President over his enemies in Congress, and if we are permitted to have more elections, many obnoxious members will be defeated, for the sins of omiss
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
rchives. Lincoln's inaugural. victory in North Carolina. rumored treaty with France. Sheridan'so Danville, Salisbury, and other places in North Carolina. He recommends that transportation be giviving an account of a successful battle in North Carolina. I append it, as the first success chronil. If Sherman cuts the communication with North Carolina, no one doubts that this city must be abanreport of another battle, since Sunday, in North Carolina, is not confirmed. The Bureau of Conscear, with high wind. Nothing further from North Carolina. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that he mor of a great victory by Gen. Johnston in North Carolina, the taking of 1500 prisoners, 70 guns, etse to go no farther at present than Charlotte, N. C.-rear of Sherman. Some of their furniture has tation of supplies to Gen. Lee's army from North Carolina; and 2d, in the event of disaster, to enable the government to run all the locomotives, cars, etc. of the Virginia roads into North Carolina. [5 more...]
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
en. Wafford, of Kentucky, is in Georgia, with 2000 mounted men, etc. Beef in market this morning sold at $12 to $15 per pound; bacon at $20, and butter at $20. The parade of a few companies of negro troops yesterday was rather a ridiculous affair. The owners are opposed to it. Gen. Rains sends in an indorsement, alleging that owing to the deception of Quartermaster Rhett (not furnishing transportation), he failed to arrest the approach of the enemy on a narrow causeway; and Columbia, S. C., and his shells, etc. fell into the hands of the enemy. A dispatch from Lee states that Gen. Thomas is at Knoxville, and that the enemy has commenced his advance from that direction — is repairing railroads, etc. The same dispatch says Gen. J. E. Johnston is removing his wounded to Smithsville from Bentonville; that the intrenchments of the enemy and greatly superior numbers of Sherman render further offensive operations impracticable. Grant's grand combination is now developed.
France (France) (search for this): chapter 49
ly. panic among officials. moving the archives. Lincoln's inaugural. victory in North Carolina. rumored treaty with France. Sheridan's movements. letter from Lord John Russell. Sherman's progress. desperate condition of the government. Disnt has requested them to remain a short time longer, as further legislation will be required growing out of a treaty with France, about to be consummated. It is said an alliance has been agreed upon, offensive and defensive, etc. etc. If this shoulhe people may suffer, but still subsist until harvest; and meantime the God of battles may change the face of affairs, or France may come to our relief. Four P. M. It is reported that the enemy have taken Weldon. They seem to be closing in on ev an article entreating the people not to submit too hastily, as in that event we shall have no benefit of the war between France and the United States--a certain event, the editor thinks. headquarters Army Confederate States, March 25th, 1865-11.2
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