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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
On the 18th the brigade moved, and encamped for the night four miles north of Kingston. On the 19th marched nine miles, and encamped on the railroad five miles south of Kingston. 20th, 21st, and 22d, remained in camp. On the 22d the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was detached for garrison duty at Kingston. On the 23d crosseKingston. On the 23d crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford and encamped on Euharlee Creek, three miles from Euharlee. On the 24th moved one mile on the Dallas road and returned to camp. 2Stth, moved to Raccoon Ford, four miles from Burnt Hickory; ordered to return to Kingston to escort a supply train. Returned to Gillem's Bridge and encamped; threw outrds. Early the following morning sent three regiments to bring up trains from Kingston to the bridge; marched with the whole command to Raccoon Ford, on the Dallas rurth Illinois rejoined the brigade, having been relieved from garrison duty at Kingston. On the 15th advanced to the front one mile in line of battle. The Thirty-fi
Island Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
m the brigade and ordered to garrison Resaca. On the 17th the brigade moved through Calhoun to a point three miles north of Adairsville. On the 18th the brigade moved, and encamped for the night four miles north of Kingston. On the 19th marched nine miles, and encamped on the railroad five miles south of Kingston. 20th, 21st, and 22d, remained in camp. On the 22d the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was detached for garrison duty at Kingston. On the 23d crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford and encamped on Euharlee Creek, three miles from Euharlee. On the 24th moved one mile on the Dallas road and returned to camp. 2Sth, remained in camp. 26th, moved to Raccoon Ford, four miles from Burnt Hickory; ordered to return to Kingston to escort a supply train. Returned to Gillem's Bridge and encamped; threw out strong picket guards. Early the following morning sent three regiments to bring up trains from Kingston to the bridge; marched with the whole command to Raccoon Ford, on
W. B. Curtis (search for this): chapter 155
reaching the opposite bank, Colonel Carlton deployed his regiment, charged and drove the enemy from his rifle-pits, Colonel Hunter moving close in support. Capt. W. B. Curtis, assistant adjutantgeneral and chief of staff, rendered the most efficient service, being personally present to superintend the movement, and won the admirathemselves neglected where all are approbated. During the time I have commanded the brigade I have had opportunity of proving the composition of my staff. Capt. W. B. Curtis, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. M. B. W. Harman, acting assistant quartermaster; Capt. James J. Donohoe, acting commissary of subsistance; Capt. E. G. Duve learned Carlton and Grosvenor led the first of our troops who cut the railroad. During the day and night my brigade captured 43 prisoners from the enemy. Captains Curtis and Whedon, of my staff, took a very active and honorable part in the operations of the day and night, rendering Colonel Hunter the most efficient assistance.
d we hold him in a deadly embrace. At 9 p. m. of the 11th we moved about three-fourths of a mile to the right and relieved a portion of General Morgan's division. This position we held until thenight oth e he nihh. Othe6t. he 19th, before daylight, moved out of our works on the Sandtown road about one-half mile and took up a position in readiness to support the troops on our right, if necessary; remained until night and returned to our works. On the 20th made a little movement as far as Wallace's place for a similar purpose; reported to Brevet Major-General Davis; relieved General Morgan's division, which went forward on a reconnaissance to the right as far as the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. At 5 p. m. we were relieved by General Davis, and returned to our works and reported to our division commander. From the 20th tothe night of the 26th we remained in our works, being constantly annoyed but not seriously hurt by the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters; occasionally a man
John B. Turchin (search for this): chapter 155
y Creek, Ga., August 20, 1864. Major: Early on the morning of the 7th of May this brigade, then commanded by Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin, broke up camp at Ringgold, Ga., and after a hard day's march encamped near Tunnel Hill, Ga., throwing out a pi, the line was immediately doubled in strength and the enemy's skirmishers driven back to the second line of hills. General Turchin then gave orders to Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, to advance the front line of thInfantry here joined the brigade. On the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th remained in camp. On the 15th Brigadier-General Turchin received a leave of absence on account of sickness, and Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer and holding it will be seen to be heavier than in any of our former operations except at Resaca. I have no doubt General Turchin will furnish a report of the operations of the brigade during the time he commanded it. I have, therefore, endeavore
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 155
saw the enemy's trains moving in the direction of .Rough and Ready on the Jonesborough road; reported the same to General Baird, who ordered Captain Morgan, Seventh Indiana Battery, to report to me with his battery, which I advanced to the skirmish line, supporting it with my entire brigade; placed the battery in a commanding position; it opened fire upon the enemy's trains, causing much disorder amongst the wagons and driving them from the main road. About 7 a. m. I was visited by Major-General Sherman and Brigadier-General Baird, who ordered me to send one or two good regiments to the front to reconnoiter the [ground] or detect the position of the enemy; sent the Ninety-second Ohio, Colonel Fearing, supported by the Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Ward, with instructions to go boldly forward at least as far as the Flint River, unless met by an overwhelming force, in which case I would bring forward my entire brigade. These gallant commanders executed my orders with promptness, and in
Marshall F. Moore (search for this): chapter 155
er the most efficient assistance. On the morning of the 1st, by direction of General Baird, I withdrew my troops from the railroad. At 12 m. marched with the other brigades on the Jonesborough road, having detached the Thirty-first Ohio to guard the trains at --Creek; passed the Second Brigade and formed a line of battle; was soon ordered to move to the front, our troops now having engaged the enemy and a brisk fight going on about one mile north of Jonesborough. On coming up I found Moore's brigade, of Carlin's division, and Este's, of ours, about ready to assault the enemy's works; received orders to support their lines; formed my brigade at a double-quick. The assault having commenced, I received an order from General Baird, through Major Connolly, to move farther to the right and support Este if necessary; moved rapidly up within about 150 yards of Este's line and ordered my men to cheer the gallant fellows who were then driving the enemy from his works. This they did wi
Benjamin D. Fearing (search for this): chapter 155
is battery, which I advanced to the skirmish line, supporting it with my entire brigade; placed the battery in a commanding position; it opened fire upon the enemy's trains, causing much disorder amongst the wagons and driving them from the main road. About 7 a. m. I was visited by Major-General Sherman and Brigadier-General Baird, who ordered me to send one or two good regiments to the front to reconnoiter the [ground] or detect the position of the enemy; sent the Ninety-second Ohio, Colonel Fearing, supported by the Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Ward, with instructions to go boldly forward at least as far as the Flint River, unless met by an overwhelming force, in which case I would bring forward my entire brigade. These gallant commanders executed my orders with promptness, and in about one hour's time reported that they had gained the opposite bank of the stream, and were repairing a bridge which had been burned by the enemy, and that in one hour's time the artillery and trains cou
staff. Capt. W. B. Curtis, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. M. B. W. Harman, acting assistant quartermaster; Capt. James J. Donohoe, acting commissary of subsistance; Capt. E. G. Dudley, provost-marshal; Capt. Edward Grosvenor, inspector; Capt. A. Whedon, acting aide-de-camp, have each and all discharged their duties in the most commendable manner. I would not neglect the opportunity of acknowledging my obligation to the regimental commanders of the brigade, their gentlemanly and soldier-liroad. I would not assert it positively, but from all the facts I have learned Carlton and Grosvenor led the first of our troops who cut the railroad. During the day and night my brigade captured 43 prisoners from the enemy. Captains Curtis and Whedon, of my staff, took a very active and honorable part in the operations of the day and night, rendering Colonel Hunter the most efficient assistance. On the morning of the 1st, by direction of General Baird, I withdrew my troops from the railro
John G. Mitchell (search for this): chapter 155
rted that they had gained the opposite bank of the stream, and were repairing a bridge which had been burned by the enemy, and that in one hour's time the artillery and trains could be crossed over. In the mean time our Third Brigade and Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of General Carlin's division, had moved forward, and General Baird, commanding in person, with my brigade in advance, followed by Este's and Mitchell's brigades, moved rapidly on as far as the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough roadMitchell's brigades, moved rapidly on as far as the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road, meeting with no resistance from the enemy. The three brigades were placed in line of battle and our position was fortified to command the road. The Atlanta and Macon Railroad now being about two and a half miles to the front, and General Baird being desirous to get his troops on it as soon as possible, ordered me to send out a force of one regiment, to be supported by a like force from Este's brigade, with instructions to push forward, if possible, to the railroad and cut it. I sent the Eigh
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