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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 1.1
th rapturous applause, and the thanks of the Society were warmly voted to the orator for his able and eloquent address, and a copy requested for publication. General Early paid a brief but touchinly-appropriate tribute to the memory of Admiral Raphael Semmes, late Vice-President of the Society for the State of Alabama, and, on motion of General Dabney H. Maury, the following minute was unanimously adopted: The death of Admiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the StatAdmiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the State ot Alabama, having occurred since the last annual meeting, the Sciety takes this occasion to express its high admiration for the exalted character, eminent abilities, and distinguished services ot the deceased, and its profoi)lnd regret for the loss the Society has sustained in his death; which is ordered to be entered on the Journal. Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, for year Ending October 31st, 1877. General D. H. Maury then read the
ues that were then agitating the country. Many compromises were devised by generous and patriotic men, who set high examples of personal sacrifice before the people, but their counsels were rejected. Compromise was as fuel to the flame. Advice and warning were lost on the people. Within a few years before the war America was, in rapid succession, bereft of the three men who have added to her fame the chief glory of the 19th century. Twenty centuries may not produce the equal of either Clay, Webster, or Calhoun. They had all, through lives of long public service, participated in the great discussions which involved every phase of this question of slavery, and had weighed all considerations affecting it in any degree. They did not in all things agree; in one they did, that slavery was under the express protection of the Constitution of the United States. In another matter, they also agreed. As death summoned each of them to his departure from earth, he turned his thoughts to
Thomas H. Carter (search for this): chapter 1.1
uch larger), we will have no difficulty in meeting all of our expenses. But we are in pressing need of means to enable us to adequately prosecute our great work, and we know not how a lover of the truth of history can better employ funds than by contributing them to the use of the Southern Historical Society. In conclusion, we would express our growing sense of the importance of collecting now, the material for a true history of our great struggle for Constitutional freedom, and we earnestly appeal to all who can add anything of value to our collection, to do so at once. By order of the Executive Committee. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary. The report was unanimously adopted. The President then announced the selection of General E. W. Pettus, of Selma, as Vice-Pesident for Alabama; and Col. Thos. H. Carter, of King William county, Va., formerly Chief of Artillery of Rodes' Division, A. N. V., as a member of the Executive Committee to fill a vacancy.
John T. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1.1
ed orator has given a picture of the violation of the peace of ‘65, and the war upon the Constitution made by the Radical party, which should be widely read, and most carefully preserved as material for the future historian. Address of General John T. Morgan, U. S. Senator from Alabama. The efforts of the Southern Historical Society have been most appropriately directed to the collection of facts relating to the period of actual and open war from 1861 to 1865. That field is yet but sligons and aflame with love of country, the soldiers and people of the Confederate States are at home again, welcomed to the honored abode of their fathers by the heroes who fought them in war, honored them in victory, and love them in peace. General Morgan was frequently interrupted with rapturous applause, and the thanks of the Society were warmly voted to the orator for his able and eloquent address, and a copy requested for publication. General Early paid a brief but touchinly-appropriate
E. W. Pettus (search for this): chapter 1.1
uch larger), we will have no difficulty in meeting all of our expenses. But we are in pressing need of means to enable us to adequately prosecute our great work, and we know not how a lover of the truth of history can better employ funds than by contributing them to the use of the Southern Historical Society. In conclusion, we would express our growing sense of the importance of collecting now, the material for a true history of our great struggle for Constitutional freedom, and we earnestly appeal to all who can add anything of value to our collection, to do so at once. By order of the Executive Committee. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary. The report was unanimously adopted. The President then announced the selection of General E. W. Pettus, of Selma, as Vice-Pesident for Alabama; and Col. Thos. H. Carter, of King William county, Va., formerly Chief of Artillery of Rodes' Division, A. N. V., as a member of the Executive Committee to fill a vacancy.
October 31st, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. The following splendid oration treats mainly of post bellum history; but this is a period of great importance as exhibiting the fruits of the doctrines of the Federal war-party. The distinguished orator has given a picture of the violation of the peace of ‘65, and the war upon the Constitution made by the Radical party, which should be widely read, and most carefully preserved as material for the future histori deceased, and its profoi)lnd regret for the loss the Society has sustained in his death; which is ordered to be entered on the Journal. Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, for year Ending October 31st, 1877. General D. H. Maury then read the following. The Executive Committee have to report that during the past year they have endeavored to keep in view the great objects of the trust committed to their charge; that they have steadily wo
November 1st, 1876 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
izens of every section free and equal opportunity of inspecting and verifying the originals of documents which it is proposed to publish. Finances. With the exception of the liberal donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq., who, last November, added $500 to his donation of the year before, the Committee has been dependent for the means of carrying on its work upon membership fees and subscriptions to our Papers. The following summary will exhibit our receipts and disbursements, from November 1st, 1876, to October 30th, 1877: Receipts. Membership fees, subscriptions, and advertisements4,244 45 Donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq500 00 Total receipts$4,744 45 Balance in treasury, as per last report51 94 Total funds$4,796 39 Disbursements. Paid on account of printing, stereotyping, and binding2,584 43 Commissions to agents646 32 Salary of Secretary816 85 Pay of clerk, stationery, and miscellaneous office expenses365 89 Postage, express, and telegrams382 90 Total disbursem
October 30th, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
free and equal opportunity of inspecting and verifying the originals of documents which it is proposed to publish. Finances. With the exception of the liberal donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq., who, last November, added $500 to his donation of the year before, the Committee has been dependent for the means of carrying on its work upon membership fees and subscriptions to our Papers. The following summary will exhibit our receipts and disbursements, from November 1st, 1876, to October 30th, 1877: Receipts. Membership fees, subscriptions, and advertisements4,244 45 Donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq500 00 Total receipts$4,744 45 Balance in treasury, as per last report51 94 Total funds$4,796 39 Disbursements. Paid on account of printing, stereotyping, and binding2,584 43 Commissions to agents646 32 Salary of Secretary816 85 Pay of clerk, stationery, and miscellaneous office expenses365 89 Postage, express, and telegrams382 90 Total disbursements$4,796 39 We h
ing to constructions of the Constitution as applied to different measures that have been proposed. They never resulted from natural causes, such as give rise to the quarrels of different nations or races of men, except so far as they related to African slavery. They only became sectional when the measures which excited the discussion happened to affect a particular section of the country. In 1812 to 1815 some of the States of the North strongly threatened to secede from the Union, which thene fate of slavery. Whether it was right or wrong, it had passed under condemnation. The sword was necessary, and would have been necessary under any circumstances to execute the sentence of the enlightened nations, as we esteem them, against African slavery in the South. The South would never have tolerated slavery as a means of darkening the barbarism of the African. They believed, and still believe, that they have done more for his civilization and enlightenment than he can ever do fo
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 1.1
corpus; to release without trial such as were accused of crime; and to seize and confiscate estates without asking the aid of a court of justice. Such governments were called military governments; but what shall we call that condition of public affairs in which such a government is sustained within and over a State-nay, three or more States--of the American Union, grouped under the sword of one satrap, like slaves bound to a single chain. If it was not a state of war, what was it? In Russia or Persia this might aptly be called a state of siege, but our Constitution has not provided for a state of siege against the sovereign parties to the Union. It has gone no further than to permit the law-making power of the land to enable the Executive, on certain conditions, to deny to individuals the writ of habeas corpus. Provinces may be outlawed in despotic governments, but States in the American Union cannot be coerced except by actual war. In our Constitution the civil power is
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