hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 538 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 492 4 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 478 10 Browse Search
Doc 448 0 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 263 1 Browse Search
B. J. Kilpatrick 260 0 Browse Search
A. G. H. Wood 245 1 Browse Search
Gettysburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) 239 3 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 231 1 Browse Search
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) 214 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 270 total hits in 56 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
J. M. Glover (search for this): chapter 40
ited States. article 5. The sick and wounded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Port Hudson, Thursday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have informed you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until all resistance would be useless. Some — where about midnight of the seventh, a Lieutenant of Holcomb's battery came to the tent of Major-General Augur's Assistant Adjutant-General, and said that th
W. N. Miles (search for this): chapter 40
ions, the right of the line resting on the edge of the prairie south of the railroad depot, the left extending in the direction of the village of Port Hudson. The arms and colors will be piled conveniently, and will be received by the officers of the United States. article 5. The sick and wounded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Port Hudson, Thursday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have informed you how,
s we got the range of it. In speaking of how much we owe the artillery, we cannot speak too highly of the unsparing exertions and skilful dispositions of General Arnold, under whom the whole of this arm of the service was placed. Collateral praise must necessarily fall upon those faithful underworkers who, although unseen at the surface, have nevertheless the most mighty results depending upon the accuracy and promptness of their observations — I mean the Topographical Engineers under Major Houston. Foremost among these were Lieutenant Ulfers, Mr. Olt mans, Mr. Robins, and the lamented Mr. Luce, who was killed a short time ago while in the act of taking an observation. The enormous amount of personal hardships and dangers these gentlemen have to undergo, after going far ahead of the army and little exploring expeditions of their own in the enemy's country — the coolness and self-possession which their services require of them in every emergency, are things of which few people pro
Henry W. Birge (search for this): chapter 40
e of agreeing upon and drawing up the terms of surrender. In reply I have the honor to state that I have designated Brigadier-General Charles P. Stone, Colonel Henry W. Birge, and Lieutenant-Colonel Richard B. Irwin as the officers to meet the commission appointed by you. They will meet your officers at the hour designated at athe Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Po never sounding sweeter. At seven o'clock, General Andrews, Chief of the Staff of General Banks, made his grand entrance into the rebel fortifications, with Colonel Birge leading his brave storming column, whose noble services have thus been, happily for their friends, dispensed with; but to whom the country is no less indebted
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 40
er who came through safely, a positive order from General Johnston to evacuate the post. This shows the wonderful rapidity and dexterity with which General Banks wheeled his army round from Alexandria and Baton Rouge upon the unsuspecting rebel chief, and should never be lost sight of in forming a fair estimate of this very brilliant military movement. Two grand things are taught us by both Vicksburgh and Port Hudson--(so like in their aim, details and results, that Colonel Smith, of General Grant's staff, while riding along our intrenchments, said he. could not help fancying he was at Vicksburgh )--and those are: First, that there is nothing like dash and determined, rapid aggressive movement against the enemy we are contending with; and second, that there is no hole now in which he can hide himself, from which we cannot — with time and proper appliances — dislodge him, as surely as a ferret upon the track of a rat. The fleet. This great arm of our service, which has hither
Jesse Smith (search for this): chapter 40
Hudson. The arms and colors will be piled conveniently, and will be received by the officers of the United States. article 5. The sick and wounded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Port Hudson, Thursday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have informed you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until all resistance would be useless. Some — where about midnight of the seventh, a Lieutenant of
Richard B. Irwin (search for this): chapter 40
imated at five thousand prisoners and fifty pieces of artillery. Very respectfully, Brigadier-General W. H. Emory, Commanding Defences of New-Orleans. Richardb. Irwin, A. A. General. To Major-General Banks, Commanding United States Forces near Port Hudson: headquarters Port Hudson, La., July 7. General: Having received inforthe terms of surrender. In reply I have the honor to state that I have designated Brigadier-General Charles P. Stone, Colonel Henry W. Birge, and Lieutenant-Colonel Richard B. Irwin as the officers to meet the commission appointed by you. They will meet your officers at the hour designated at a point where the flag of truce was of truce. Very soon after that an officer came galloping up, in the bright light of a waning moon, from General Banks's headquarters; and I heard the voice of Colonel Irwin eagerly inquiring for the tent of General Augur--the whole camp being in calm repose. The few who were awake wondered, of course, what all this could mean; an
William Dwight (search for this): chapter 40
airie south of the railroad depot, the left extending in the direction of the village of Port Hudson. The arms and colors will be piled conveniently, and will be received by the officers of the United States. article 5. The sick and wounded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Port Hudson, Thursday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have informed you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until
James Montgomery (search for this): chapter 40
rs just as well as we treat theirs. The country will be glad to know that it is so, and that if they cannot afford champagne to their brave prisoners, they at least show them the same polite attentions and allow them the same latitude of visiting families in the neighborhood. It will be equally satisfactory to know that this lovely spirit of humanity and chivalry does not exist alone at Richmond, but among the chivalrous cut-throats of Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. The rebels hung Colonel Montgomery in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissances in force to that effect, on the t
Charles H. Arnold (search for this): chapter 40
he gallant Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond, and his fine crew, who sent desolation along with every shot from their large pieces. The effect was, that soon after we began bombarding in earnest, every gun upon the front batteries was silenced; and they have so remained for weeks since; any one they replaced being knocked over as soon as we got the range of it. In speaking of how much we owe the artillery, we cannot speak too highly of the unsparing exertions and skilful dispositions of General Arnold, under whom the whole of this arm of the service was placed. Collateral praise must necessarily fall upon those faithful underworkers who, although unseen at the surface, have nevertheless the most mighty results depending upon the accuracy and promptness of their observations — I mean the Topographical Engineers under Major Houston. Foremost among these were Lieutenant Ulfers, Mr. Olt mans, Mr. Robins, and the lamented Mr. Luce, who was killed a short time ago while in the act of ta
1 2 3 4 5 6