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George Doles (search for this): chapter 3.28
yond his brigade came Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimb, and escaping, where possible, into adjacent clearings. The foremost men of Doles's brigade took about half an hour to strike our advance picket on the pike. Thd effectively for a few minutes, for it required a main line to dislodge them. Doles says, concerning the next check he received, After a resistance of about ten miy to fire the instant it was possible. Let us pause here a moment and follow Doles, who led the enemy's attack. He states that, after his first successful chargee men in gray. In justice to the men of Devens's division who first resisted Doles it should be stated that the official report of the latter shows that his columjected to a heavy musketry fire, with grape, canister, and shell.--editors. Doles, who must have been a cool man to see so clearly amid the screeching shells and
Louis Hoffmann (search for this): chapter 3.28
his reserves to the north of Hawkins's farm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my adjutant-general. See pp. 219 and 220. The original dispatch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters.
Robert E. Rodes (search for this): chapter 3.28
ning before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of n of this plan was intrusted to Lieutenant-General Jackson with his three divisions. Jackson's movement, with a stronger indication of battle, began at sunrise, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, in the order named, following the old road by the Catherine Furnace, there shoving off farther south to get beyond the sight of our men; rt of Sickles's promised attack. There was no real battle there, so we returned rapidly to our post at the tavern and dismounted. Meanwhile the Confederate General Rodes had been reaching his place in the Wilderness. At 4 P. M. his men were in position; the line of battle of his own brigade touched the pike west of us with its
William C. Talley (search for this): chapter 3.28
all's Tavern. Just beyond Dowdall's was a slight backward hook in the line, partially encircling Talley's Hill, a sunny spot in the forest between the Orange Plank road and the pike. This pike is an old roadway which skirts the northern edge of Talley's farm, and makes an angle of some forty degrees with the Orange Plank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and leftightning zigzagged in flashes, and the deep-bassed thunder echoed more loudly, till there was scarcely an interval between its ominous crashing discharges. In some such manner came on that battle of May 2d to the watchers at Dowdall's Tavern and Talley's farm-house. The first distant symptom occurred on the evening of May 1st. Then was heard the sudden crack of rifle-shooting. It began with Steinwehr's skirmishers, and then passed on to Schurz. Schimmelfennig pushed out a brigade straight
W. H. F. Lee (search for this): chapter 3.28
lank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his l
proval, moved a part of his reserves to the north of Hawkins's farm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my adjutant-general. See pp. 219 and 220. The original dispatch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 3.28
completes a horse-shoe bend. Here, on the south shore, was General Hooker's battle-line on the morning of the 2d of May, 1863. Here his five army corps, those of Meade, Slocum, Couch, Sickles, and Howard, were deployed. The face was toward the south, and the ranks mainly occupied a ridge nearly parallel with the Rapidan. The leer was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, ande Chancellorsville line, which I have just described. On the preceding Thursday, the last of April, the three corps that constituted the right wing of the army, Meade's, Slocum's, and mine, had crossed from the north to the south side of the Rapidan, and by 4 o'clock in the afternoon had reached the vicinity of Chancellorsville,
R. E. Colston (search for this): chapter 3.28
ore, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, s plan was intrusted to Lieutenant-General Jackson with his three divisions. Jackson's movement, with a stronger indication of battle, began at sunrise, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, in the order named, following the old road by the Catherine Furnace, there shoving off farther south to get beyond the sight of our men; then swecame Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimble's division (Colston Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), with Ramseur on the right following Colquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P
Adolphus Buschbeck (search for this): chapter 3.28
house. In front of me, facing south along a curving ridge, the right of Steinwehr's division was located. He had but two brigades, Barlow on the Plank road and Buschbeck on his right. With them Steinwehr covered a mile, leaving but two regiments for reserve. These he put some two hundred yards to his rear, near the little Wildeel Joseph Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant-General, joined me there; my own staff gathered around me. I was eager to fill the trenches that Barlow would have held. Buschbeck's second line was ordered to change front there. His men kept their ranks, but at first they appeared slow. Would they never get there! Dickinson said, Oh, e been a cool man to see so clearly amid the screeching shells and all the hot excitement of battle, says again: He (meaning our forces from Schimmelfennig's and Buschbeck's brigades, and perhaps part of McLean's, who had faced about and had not yet given way) made a stubborn resistance from behind a wattling fence on a hill covere
Louis Schirmer (search for this): chapter 3.28
ut beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. Gen his report that the masses which were rallied here were reorganized and led forward two or three times, but were dispersed by the enemy's flank fire.--editors. Schirmer managed 1. Union breastworks in the woods between Dowdall's Tavern and Chancellorsville. 2. Relics of the dead in the woods near the Plank road. 3. Theainst the attack now reaching them. I had come to my last practicable stand. The Confederates were slowly advancing, firing as they came. The twelve guns of Schirmer, the corps chief of artillery, increased by a part of Dilger's battery, fired, at first with rapidity; but the battery men kept falling from death and wounds. S
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