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Cherbourg (France) (search for this): chapter 12.91
r that we captured and commissioned. Upon our arrival at Cherbourg, Sinclair came at once to join his old ship, having heardurope, and on the 11th of June, 1864, entered the port of Cherbourg, and applied for permission to go into dock. There beinghe engagement. With a large number of the inhabitants of Cherbourg they collected on every prominent point on the shore thatphold it! Go to your quarters. Chart of the action off Cherbourg. In about forty-five minutes we were somewhat over a into us five shot. In Captain Winslow's letter (dated Cherbourg, June 21st, 1864) to the Secretary of the Navy, he says: was made on the former for the purpose of again reaching Cherbourg. When the object was apparent the Kearsarge was steered who were saved by the French pilot-boats, were taken into Cherbourg. Our loss was 9 killed, 21 wounded. and 10 drowned. IMr. Lancaster and Captain Semmes, previous to our leaving Cherbourg, that in the event of the Alabama being sunk the Deerhoun
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.91
cer, had served twenty years in the old navy, and had accompanied every expedition of a warlike nature fitted out by the United States during that period. In the Mexican war, on the coast of California, I served ashore and afloat; then with the gallant Commodore Perry, in his expedition to Japan, and again in the Paraguay expedition. Our second lieutenant, R. F. Armstrong, from Georgia, and third lieutenant, J. D. Wilson, from Florida, came out with us in the Sumter. They were just from Annapolis, having resigned on the secession of their respective States. Both the father and the grandfather of our fourth lieutenant, Arthur Sinclair, Jr., of Virginia, had been captains in the United States navy. Our fifth lieutenant, John Lowe, of Georgia, had seen some service, and was a most efficient officer; Rear-Admiral Raphael Semmes, C. S. N., Captain of the Alabama. from a photograph taken in England after the loss of his ship. our Acting Master, I. D. Bulloch, of Georgia, was a you
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.91
e not permitted to join us, on the ground that it would be a violation of French neutrality. The remainder of the steerage mess was made up of young master's mates and engineers, most of whom had come out with us in the Sumter. Of the crew of the Alabama I cannot say too much. It was made up from all the seafaring nations of the globe, with a large sprinkling of Yankee tars (among whom are to be found the best sailors), and with a nucleus of Southern pilots and seamen from the ports of Savannah, Charleston, and New Orleans. The pilots were given the positions of petty officers, and sustained their reputation nobly, materially aiding in the discipline of the crew, for upon our peculiar service, and with our ports locked against us, we were compelled to observe the strictest discipline, both with officers and crew. As the executive officer who enforced this discipline I may say that a nobler set of young men filling the position of officers, and a braver and more willing crew, nev
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 12.91
r of high standing in the old navy, had studied law, paying particular attention to the international branch, and had been admitted to the bar in Alabama, of which State he was a citizen. Thus he was eminently qualified for the position he was now called upon to assume. During the Mexican war he commanded the brig Somers in the blockade of Vera Cruz, and lost that unfortunate vessel in chase, during a norther, and narrowly escaped drowning. He afterward accompanied the army to the city of Mexico. The writer, his executive officer, had served twenty years in the old navy, and had accompanied every expedition of a warlike nature fitted out by the United States during that period. In the Mexican war, on the coast of California, I served ashore and afloat; then with the gallant Commodore Perry, in his expedition to Japan, and again in the Paraguay expedition. Our second lieutenant, R. F. Armstrong, from Georgia, and third lieutenant, J. D. Wilson, from Florida, came out with us in th
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 12.91
I wished him a pleasant voyage with us; and I am sure he, with his officers and men, received every attention while on board the Alabama. As the reader will see, this was quite in contrast with the treatment received by us from the Kearsarge upon the sinking of the Alabama.--J. McI. K. See also pages 620 and 621.--editors. We paroled the officers and crew of the Hatteras at Kingston, Jamaica, and after repairing a few shot-holes and coaling ship, we passed on to our work in the South Atlantic, taking our position at the cross-roads of the homeward-bound East India and Pacific trade. After a few weeks of good work in that locality and along the coast of Brazil, we crossed over to the Cape of Good Hope, where we played hide and seek with the United States steamer Vanderbilt, whose commander, Charles H. Baldwin, had explained to Sir Baldwin Walker, the English Admiral of the station at Simon's Town, that he did not intend to fire a gun at the Alabama, but to run her down and si
Indian Ocean (search for this): chapter 12.91
eamed out of Simon's Bay. By morning we had made a good offing, and, setting what sail we could carry, hoisted our propeller and made a due south course. We ran down to the fortieth degree Captain John McIntosh Kell, executive officer of the Alabama. from a photograph taken in Southampton immediately after the fight. south latitude, where we fell in with westerly gales and bowled along nearly due east, until we shaped our course for the Straits of Java. Our long stretch across the Indian Ocean placed us in the China Sea, where we were least expected, and where we soon fell in with the China trade. In a few weeks we had so paralyzed the enemy's commerce that their ships were absolutely locked up in port, and neutrals were doing all the carrying trade. Having thus virtually cleared the sea of the United States flag, we ran down to Singapore, coaled ship, and then turned westward through the Straits of Malacca, across to India, thence to the east coast of Africa. Passing throug
Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.91
ft the mainmast; and six 32-pounders in broadside. Our crew numbered about 120 men and 24 officers. The commander, Captain Semmes, had been an officer of high standing in the old navy, had studied law, paying particular attention to the international branch, and had been admitted to the bar in Alabama, of which State he was a citizen. Thus he was eminently qualified for the position he was now called upon to assume. During the Mexican war he commanded the brig Somers in the blockade of Vera Cruz, and lost that unfortunate vessel in chase, during a norther, and narrowly escaped drowning. He afterward accompanied the army to the city of Mexico. The writer, his executive officer, had served twenty years in the old navy, and had accompanied every expedition of a warlike nature fitted out by the United States during that period. In the Mexican war, on the coast of California, I served ashore and afloat; then with the gallant Commodore Perry, in his expedition to Japan, and again in
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.91
ndsome suite of state-rooms. The starboard steerage was for midshipmen, the port for engineers. Next came the engine-room, coal-bunkers, etc.; then the berth-deck, accommodating 120 men. Under the ward-room were store-rooms and under the steerage were shell-rooms. Just forward of the fire-room came the hold, next the magazines, and, forward of all, the boatswain's and sailmaker's store-rooms. The hold was all under the berth-deck.--editors. Our armament consisted of eight guns: one Blakely 100-pounder rifled gun, pivoted forward; one 8-inch solid-shot gun, pivoted abaft the mainmast; and six 32-pounders in broadside. Our crew numbered about 120 men and 24 officers. The commander, Captain Semmes, had been an officer of high standing in the old navy, had studied law, paying particular attention to the international branch, and had been admitted to the bar in Alabama, of which State he was a citizen. Thus he was eminently qualified for the position he was now called upon to a
Terceira (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 12.91
erate States Government. In the House of Commons the senior partner of the constructors stated that she left Liverpool a perfectly legitimate transaction. Captain James D. Bulloch, as agent for the Confederacy, superintended her construction. As a ruse she was sent on a trial trip, with a large party of ladies and gentlemen. A tug met the ship in the channel and took off the guests, while the two hundred and ninetieth ship built in the Laird yard proceeded on her voyage to the island of Terceira, one of the Azores, whither a transport had preceded her with war material. Captain Raphael Semmes, with his officers, carried by the Bahama, met her there. Under the lee of the island, outside the marine league, we lashed our ships together, and made the transfer of armament and stores. Arriving on Wednesday, August 20th, 1862, by Saturday night we had completed the transfer, and on Sunday morning, under a cloudless sky, upon the broad Atlantic, a common heritage, we put the Alabama i
Samuel C. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 12.91
t forty men, including Captain Semmes and thirteen officers. At 1 P. M. we started for Southampton. editors. When Mr. Lancaster approached Captain Semmes, and said, I think every man has been picked up; where shall I land you? Captain Semmes replied, I am now under the English colors, and the sooner you put me with my officers and men on English soil, the better. The little yacht moved rapidly The sinking of the Alabama. away at once, under a press of steam, for Southampton. Armstrong, our second lieutenant, and some of our men who were saved by the French pilot-boats, were taken into Cherbourg. Our loss was 9 killed, 21 wounded. and 10 drowned. It has been charged that an arrangement had been entered into between Mr. Lancaster and Captain Semmes, previous to our leaving Cherbourg, that in the event of the Alabama being sunk the Deerhound would come to our rescue. Captain Semmes and myself met Mr. Lancaster for the first time when rescued by him, and he related to
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