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Lake Pontchartrain (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
between it and Battery Gladden, See page 513. lay a half-sunken iron-clad floating battery, with a cannon on its top. The voyage down the bay was very delightful. We saw the Floating Battery. battered light-house at Fort Morgan, See page 443. in the far distance, to the left, as we turned into Grant's Pass, See page 440. and took the inner passage. The waters of the Gulf were smooth; and at dawn the next morning, we were moored at the railway wharf on the western sidle of Lake Pontchartrain. We were at the St. Charles Hotel, in New Orleans, in time for an early break-fast; and in that city, during his stay, the writer experienced the kindest courtesy and valuable assistance in the prosecution of his researches, from Generals Sheridan and Hartsuff. Two works of art, then in New Orleans, were objects of special interest, when considering the inscriptions upon each, in their relation to the rebellion. One was the equestrian statue of Andrew Jackson, in Jackson Square, t
La Grange (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
her of their iron-clad gun-boats, then lying twelve miles below Columbus. In the mean time, La Grange had pushed on to West Point, April 16, 1865. where he found a strong bastioned earth-work, mobridge which crossed the Chattahoochee River, and the little village of West Point. This work La Grange assaulted on three sides, with his men dismounted, at a little past one Fort Tyler. this er destroying nineteen locomotives and three hundred and forty-five loaded cars at West Point, La Grange crossed the river, burned the bridges behind him, and moved on April 17. due east toward Macordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still abseavages of camping armies, or active and destructive raiders. The country between Fairborn and La Grange was a special sufferer by raids. In the vicinity of Newham the gallant Colonel James Brownlow
Claiborne, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
and excepting some Massachusetts mounted infantry, taking with him ten days half-rations, and as much forage as the men could carry, for the purpose of occupying Claiborne, on the Alabama River, to prevent troops coming down to the relief of Mobile. He left on the 5th of April, and on the 7th he met a negro with dispatches from Gelly sewed up in the collar of his vest. Lucas furnished him with a guard and mule, and sent him on. From this courier he learned that a Confederate force was at Claiborne, and Lucas determined to capture it. On the way, the First Louisiana Cavalry encountered a mounted force at Mount Pleasant, charged and routed them, and in a pursuit of two miles, by Lucas in full force, he captured two battle-flags, three commissioned officers, and sixty men, with a loss of only five men. Pushing on to Claiborne, he went into camp there, and thither his scouts brought prisoners nearly every day On the 18th, when he received an order from Canby to return to Blakely, he had
Choctaw Point (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
lines of fortifications were occupied by troops, the embankments were covered with verdure and the fort or redoubt, delineated on page 507, was white with the blossoms of the blackberry shrub, when the writer sketched it. It was at a little past noon , on a warm April day, when we left Mobile for New Orleans, in the fine new steamer, Frances. We passed the various batteries indicated on the map on page 507, as we went out of the harbor into the open waters of the bay. A little below Choctaw Point, and between it and Battery Gladden, See page 513. lay a half-sunken iron-clad floating battery, with a cannon on its top. The voyage down the bay was very delightful. We saw the Floating Battery. battered light-house at Fort Morgan, See page 443. in the far distance, to the left, as we turned into Grant's Pass, See page 440. and took the inner passage. The waters of the Gulf were smooth; and at dawn the next morning, we were moored at the railway wharf on the western sidle
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
t Point capture of Fort Tyler, 520. Croxton's destructive raid, 521. the author's journey from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capital, 523. at Selma, Mobile, and New Orleans, 524. departure for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, 525. The repossession of Alabama was an important part of General Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary preliminary movtroy the. Union and establish an empire founded upon slavery, these mute but terrible accusers, rebuked the criminals unmolested. Having accomplished the object of his errand in that great metropolis of the Gulf region, he reluctantly bade adieu to his traveling companions for ten days (Mr. and Mrs. Hart), and embarked on the Mississippi River for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, in the steamer Indiana. That voyage has already been considered. See page 688, volume II. Tail-piece — artesian wel
Centreville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
oxton, and from a subsequent dispatch from the latter to himself, that, instead of going on to Tuscaloosa, he should endeavor to fight Jackson and prevent his joining Forrest, Wilson ordered McCook to move rapidly, with La Grange's brigade, to Centreville, cross the Cahawba there, and push on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's column. McCook found Jackson at Scottsville, well posted, with intrenchments covering his column. Croxton had not come up, and he could hear nothing of him. Feeling too weak to attack the Confederates, he skirmished with them a little, burned a factory at Scottsville, and then fell back. He destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and a
Tuskegee (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
Republic was unfurled in triumph over the State House, where, on the 4th of March, 1861, the first Confederate flag Was given to the breeze, when it was adopted as the ensign of the Confederacy by the Provisional Government, at Montgomery. See page 256, volume I. Wilson paused two days at Montgomery, and then pushed on eastward toward the Chattahoochee River, the boundary between Alabama and Georgia,--Columbus, in the latter State, ninety miles distant, being his chief objective. At Tuskegee, Colonel La Grange was detached and sent to West Point at the crossing of the Chattahoochee River by the railway connecting Montgomery and Atlanta while the main column passed on toward Columbus. That city was on the east side of the Chattahoochee, and when Wilson came in sight of it, in front of the Confederate works, on the evening of the 16th, he found one of the bridges on fire. Upton's division, was at once arranged for an assault, and in the darkness of the evening a charge of three
Trion (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
risoners. Upton bivouacked fourteen miles south of Montevallo that night, and early the next morning April 1. rode into Randolph unmolested. There he captured a courier, whose dispatches informed him that Forrest was now on his front in heavy force; that one of that leader's divisions, under General Jackson, was moving easterly from Tuscaloosa, with all the wagons and artillery of the Confederate cavalry; and that General Croxton, on his way from Elyton, had struck Jackson's rearguard at Trion, and interposed himself between it and Forrest's train. Informed, also, by the intercepted dispatch, that Jackson was about to fight Croxton, and from a subsequent dispatch from the latter to himself, that, instead of going on to Tuscaloosa, he should endeavor to fight Jackson and prevent his joining Forrest, Wilson ordered McCook to move rapidly, with La Grange's brigade, to Centreville, cross the Cahawba there, and push on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's c
Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
at Cherokee got within range of the works at the beginning, and, at intervals throughout the siege, hurled a 100-pound shell into the fort. The squadron did good service, not only in shelling the works, but in driving the Confederate vessels so far to-ward the city, that their fire failed to reach the besiegers. The National vessels kept up a steady fire all day, and retired at night to anchorage at Great Point Clear. In these operations of the squadron, two of the gunboats (Milwaukee and Osage) were destroyed by torpedoes. When, on the 3d of April, the Nationals had built an earth-work and mounted large guns upon it within two hundred yards of the fort, the latter was completely and closely invested, and its doom was sealed. Yet the garrison fought bravely on, and the besiegers suffered greatly from the shells, for the lines were at short range from the fort. At length Canby determined to make a grand assault by a concentric fire from all his heavy guns, his field-pieces, and
Gulf (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
laveholders for actual rebellion, and whilst it was rampant in New Orleans, might have been read these words of that great statesman:--if I could be instrumental in Eradicating this Deep stain, slavery, from the character of My country, I would not exchange the Proud satisfaction I should enjoy, for. The honor of all the triumphs ever decreed to the most successful conqueror. While no living lips, dared, for many months, to utter a word of reproof to those who, in New Orleans, were trying to destroy the. Union and establish an empire founded upon slavery, these mute but terrible accusers, rebuked the criminals unmolested. Having accomplished the object of his errand in that great metropolis of the Gulf region, he reluctantly bade adieu to his traveling companions for ten days (Mr. and Mrs. Hart), and embarked on the Mississippi River for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, in the steamer Indiana. That voyage has already been considered. See page 688, volume II. Tail-piece — artesian wel
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