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Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 2
expedition which was fitted out in the earlier part of April to go to the relief of Sumter, the history of which will appear further on in this narrative. Secretary Welles, with a decision worthy of the occasion, did fit out an expedition for the relief of Sumter, the last vessel of which sailed from New York on the 9th of Apri but he was now old, and at a time when he should have maintained his self-possession he appears to have completely lost his head. The Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Welles, had not yet made himself familiar with the conditions of affairs in his department. His position was a difficult one for a man advanced in years, for the duties were complicated, and such as only an expert could be expected to fathom in so short a time. Mr. Welles was surrounded with officers and clerks, some of whose loyalty was doubted, and one bureau of the Department in particular, presided over by an officer of Southern birth and of national reputation, was the headquarters of
John Scott (search for this): chapter 2
ter. indignant people. Anderson's gallant fight, and surrender to the secessionists. effect of the surrender of Sumter. Lincoln's position toward Virginia. Gen. Scott and the Virginians. Commodore McCauley. secrets of the Navy Department made known by disloyal officers. conspirators at work. a plot to seize Norfolk Navy Ymed towards the States farther South. It was deemed desirable that the Administration should do nothing to wound the sensitive feelings of the Virginians, and General Scott, the General-in-Chief of our Army, was particularly solicitous that the Government should give the State of Virginia no excuse to secede. There were several State. The Naval Department at that moment seemed powerless to preserve the public property at Norfolk against the rebel troops then assembling in Virginia. General Scott threw cold water on every attempt to hold the Norfolk Yard, on the ground that he had no troops to spare, as he could not deplete Fortress Monroe, which must b
Hiram Paulding (search for this): chapter 2
k Navy Yard. the Navy Department powerless. Commodore Paulding summoned. hostile attitude of the people of situation, summoned to the Navy Department Commodore Hiram Paulding, a loyal officer, but who was now declinin only energy of mind but great bodily vigor. Commodore Paulding broke up the conclave which was in the habit , was now the very hotbed of secession. Commodore Hiram Paulding. The Southern officers could hardly rest while the Pawnee of fifteen guns had brought Commodore Paulding from Washington with instructions to save whae could and act as he thought proper. When Commodore Paulding arrived at the Navy Yard he found that all thked! The whole thing looked so hopeless to Commodore Paulding that, in view of the orders he had received fful alternative to that faithful old officer, Commodore Paulding, who abhorred everything in the shape of rebe loyalty of those gallant old seamen, McCauley and Paulding, for undoubtedly they had the best interests of th
Wadsworth (search for this): chapter 2
a crew, or the Plymouth, in the same condition, would, with a few men on board, have saved the Navy Yard against attack, overawed Norfolk and Portsmouth, and prevented the channel from being obstructed by the Confederates. Even when the yard was abandoned and the buildings set fire to, the work was done in a panic in which the coolest persons seem to have lost their heads. The destruction took place when the yard had been re-enforced by a regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers under Colonel Wadsworth, while the Pawnee of fifteen guns had brought Commodore Paulding from Washington with instructions to save what he could and act as he thought proper. When Commodore Paulding arrived at the Navy Yard he found that all the Southern officers had sent in their resignations and abandoned their posts. The mechanics, following their example, had left the yard in a body, and persons had even come in from outside and possessed themselves of the Government arms. It was reported that severa
Edward York McCauley (search for this): chapter 2
rginia. Gen. Scott and the Virginians. Commodore McCauley. secrets of the Navy Department made knhief Engineer Isher Wood. indecision of Commodore McCauley. the torch applied to the Navy Yard andns culottes of the French Revolution. Commodore McCauley, who commanded the Navy Yard, had long ao a place of safety, but was informed by Commodore McCauley that it would take a month to put her madore Jas. Alden was ordered to report to Commodore McCauley to take command of the Merrimac, and Chifolk; and every impediment was thrown in Commodore McCauley's way by his own subordinates to preventhe work was all done with the consent of Commodore McCauley; but when he was informed that everythinat the course which events were taking. Commodore McCauley at one time was master of the situation,e who were to fire the public property. Commodore McCauley had gone to bed that night worn out withoubt the loyalty of those gallant old seamen, McCauley and Paulding, for undoubtedly they had the be[1 more...]
James Alden (search for this): chapter 2
Navy Yard. the Navy Department powerless. Commodore Paulding summoned. hostile attitude of the people of Norfolk and Portsmouth. vessels at the Norfolk Navy Yard. ships that were historic. aggressive movements of the Confederates. Commander James Alden. Chief Engineer Isher Wood. indecision of Commodore McCauley. the torch applied to the Navy Yard and vessels by the Federal authorities. vessels that were saved. the greatest misfortune to the Union cause. the Merrimac, etc., etc. vessel was ordered to proceed at once to Norfolk. It shows the miserable condition of the Navy when the department had nothing but a revenue cutter to depend upon. Days went by before anything else was attempted. On the 11th of April Commodore Jas. Alden was ordered to report to Commodore McCauley to take command of the Merrimac, and Chief Engineer Isherwood was sent to Norfolk to get the ship's engines in working order as soon as possible. On the 14th the work was commenced, and on the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 2
. Hamilton's floating battery. Major Anderson. Sumter returns the fire. unequal contest. tardy attempts to relieve Sumter. indignant people. Anderson's gallant fight, and surrender to the secessionists. effect of the surrender of Sumter. Lincoln's position toward Virginia. Gen. Scott and the Virginians. Commodore McCauley. secrets of the Navy Department made known by disloyal officers. conspirators at work. a plot to seize Norfolk Navy Yard. the Navy Department powerless. Commodoce from 1861 to 1865, and it is to be hoped that by each one contributing his mite, in the course of time a true history will be written. The best of efforts will be made in this history to make it a true if not an interesting one. When President Lincoln entered upon the duties of his office, his position towards Virginia differed somewhat from that which he assumed towards the States farther South. It was deemed desirable that the Administration should do nothing to wound the sensitive fe
B. F. Isherwood (search for this): chapter 2
e department had nothing but a revenue cutter to depend upon. Days went by before anything else was attempted. On the 11th of April Commodore Jas. Alden was ordered to report to Commodore McCauley to take command of the Merrimac, and Chief Engineer Isherwood was sent to Norfolk to get the ship's engines in working order as soon as possible. On the 14th the work was commenced, and on the 17th the engines were in working order — so much for the Commandant's assertion that it would take a mobe in good order. Next morning the Commandant was again informed that everything was ready, but he replied that he had not decided to send the Merrimac out. It was in vain that he was reminded of the peremptory character of the order which Mr. Isherwood had brought from the Secretary of the Navy to get the Merrimac out at the earliest possible moment. He only replied that he would let his decision be known in the course of the day. He gave as a reason the obstructions that had been placed i
Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. First gun of the civil war fired. batteries at Cummings Point. Capt. McCready's battery. Capt. Hamilton's floating battery. Major Anderson. Sumter returns the fire. unequal contest. tardy attempts to relieve Sumter. indignant people. Anderson's gallant fight, and surrender to the secessionists. effect of the surrender of Sumter. Lincoln's position toward Virginia.ter, blowing up a building; this was almost immediately followed by another shell, which scattered destruction all around. Fort Moultrie then took up the assault, and in another moment the guns from the gun battery on Cummings Point, from Captain McCready's battery, from Captain James Hamilton's floating battery, the enfilading battery, and every other point where a gun could be brought to bear on Sumter, opened in succession; and the guns poured forth their wrath as if the fort standing out
Isher Wood (search for this): chapter 2
surrender of Sumter. Lincoln's position toward Virginia. Gen. Scott and the Virginians. Commodore McCauley. secrets of the Navy Department made known by disloyal officers. conspirators at work. a plot to seize Norfolk Navy Yard. the Navy Department powerless. Commodore Paulding summoned. hostile attitude of the people of Norfolk and Portsmouth. vessels at the Norfolk Navy Yard. ships that were historic. aggressive movements of the Confederates. Commander James Alden. Chief Engineer Isher Wood. indecision of Commodore McCauley. the torch applied to the Navy Yard and vessels by the Federal authorities. vessels that were saved. the greatest misfortune to the Union cause. the Merrimac, etc., etc. At thirty minutes past 4 o'clock, on April 12, 1861, the first gun of civil war was fired, the battery on James Island discharging the first howitzer shell, which fell inside Fort Sumter, blowing up a building; this was almost immediately followed by another shell, which sc
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