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Hamburg, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
fter him. His wife — a quiet, dignified personage — in spite of his frequent, shrieked warnings to her, came kindly forward and gave me a glass. Augusta. Opposite Augusta, on the other side of the Savannah River, is the town of Hamburg, in South Carolina. Although the pestilence had raged in Augusta with terrible fatality for more than a month, no case of yellow fever had as yet occurred in the town of Hamburg. The wind, fortunately for the town, had blown in the opposite direction evHamburg. The wind, fortunately for the town, had blown in the opposite direction ever since the plague broke out. They expected to be stricken as soon as the wind should veer about. Yet they escaped; no single case occurred there ; for the wind was friendly to them to the end. I walked down to the river side. It was sad to see Augusta — apparently deserted — not a human being anywhere visible! When the people found that I intended to cross, they earnestly remonstrated with me. But I went up to the bridge — and stepped on it. It is rather a solemn thing to do at such
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
and incredulous inquirer should suggest that the contrast which has been adverted to, and which is so manifest, might be traced to a difference of climate, or other causes distinct from slavery itself, permit me to refer him to the two States of Kentucky and Ohio. No difference of soil, no diversity of climate, no diversity in the original settlement of those two States can account for the remarkable disproportion in their natural advancement. Separated by a river alone, they seem to have beenpact, the States who are parties thereto have the right, and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them. Kentucky indorsed this doctrine through the pen of Thomas Jefferson: The several States, so the passage reads, who formed the instrument being sovereign and independent, have the unquestionable right to judge of the infraction, and a nullification, by
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
leave the city in a hurry — to escape the entangling endearments of the cholera, which already had its hands in my hair before I could reach the Mississippi River--I never had an opportunity of fully ascertaining their true sentiments and condition. I saw several slave sales; but they did not differ from similar scenes in Richmond. The Higher Law and old Abraham. Let me recall one incident. In the courts of New Orleans there is an old, stout, fair-complexioned, grey-haired lawyer, of Dutch build and with a Dutch cognomen. I saw a pamphlet one day — his address to a college of young lawyers — opened it, and read a most emphatic denunciation of the doctrine of a Higher Law. One day I visited the prisons of New Orleans. At one of them — a mere lock-up, if I remember rightly, for I have forgotten its name and exact location — the jailer, or an officer in the room where the records are kept, told me, in the course of a conversation, that there was an old nigger inside, who
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 5
s the solemn warning- Live for the eternal life. IV. Ye may talk, and print, and vainly Rear a pyramid of lies, Slavery is still a fiction, Still his lord the slave denies; Still the mighty Institution Is a long enduring crime: God and devil, truth and falsehood, Slave and freedom, never rhyme! V. Is the negro man or monkey? Has he reason — yea or no? Is the brutal Celtic peasant Placed above him or below? Is intelligence the measure, Or the color of the skin? Is the slavery of white men Russia's virtue or her sin? VI. But I argue not; I scorn to Make a channel of my mouth, For the simple facts that conscience Proves to all from North to South; There is not a single slaver In the land, that dares to say That the mighty institution Will not die and pass away. VII. Let it vanish! let it perish! Let the blot on Freedom's flag Be torn from it, and rejected Though it leave you but a rag! Let the prisoner and captive Not be loosened on parole, But released as the descendants Of the
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
. I walked as far as Weldon, North Carolina, from Petersburg, and there I took the cars for Wilmington. On the road I had a talk with a Virginia slave, which I reserve for another chapter. uld provide me with the stock. I had no offer. Vii North and South Carolina. At Wilmington in a fix walk to Augusta the road discontentment North Carolina could be made a Free Stat the scenery of the country to repay me for my journey. So I jumped into the cars and rode to Wilmington. A long walk. I staid there four or five days in the expectation of receiving a draft from Philadelphia which a debtor had promised to forward from that city to my address at Wilmington. He failed to fulfill his promise. Here was a pretty fix to be in — only a few dollars in my purse — it. I was ten days on the trip, I find; but whether ten days to Columbus, or ten days from Wilmington to Augusta, I cannot now recall. I walked from Columbus to Augusta in two days: that I rememb
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
proslavery opinions four reasons property in man is robbery of man slavery a cowardly institution Prejudice of race city, plantation, and hired-out country slaves a black Rothschild why the Southern ladies are pro-slavery a poem by William North, About Southern women and Northern travellers chiefly. I remained in Montgomery two or three weeks; sailed down the romantic Alabama to Mobile; in that place rambled for twenty-four hours; and then entered the steamer for the city of New Orleans. I passed the winter there. For reasons that I have already stated, I did not speak with the slaves on the subject of bondage during the earlier part of my sojourn; and, as I was obliged to leave the city in a hurry — to escape the entangling endearments of the cholera, which already had its hands in my hair before I could reach the Mississippi River--I never had an opportunity of fully ascertaining their true sentiments and condition. I saw several slave sales; but they did not diff
Warren (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s oracle; and hence, being a serf, it commands no respect. The Peanut Seller's Triumph. I heard a good story of Young America at Atlanta. It shows what manner of individual that young gentleman is. I believe I have forgotten to state that I w full speed, seldom exceed the rate of three miles an hour until they reach a considerable distance from the city. Young America attached a piece of string to the pork, and went down with another boy to the place where the grade is steepest. Nhis willing and laughing comrade. The rail, of course, was rather greasy. The freight train came up. Puff-uff-uff! Young America screamed with delight. It was literally as he said, No go, nohow! For two days the engine vigorously puffed from to call in the aid of another engine. Thus concludeth the instructive history of the Peanut Seller's Triumph; or, Young America's Revenge. Xi. Alabama. A journey afoot Contentment of slaves in Alabama railroad hands their allowanc
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s little baggage along with him. He threatened to cut his bowels out if he dared to return. Alone — sick — a member of an outcast race — without money — without family — and without a home in his tottering old age! Where could the wretched invalid go? He applied to the police. They took him to the jail and confined him in that putrid cell! How long, oh Lord! How long? Here my talks with the slaves on my third trip end. From New Orleans I sailed to St. Louis, and from thence to Kansas, where I lived, with brief intervals, for three years, during the civil wars and the troubles which so long distracted that unhappy Territory. About Northern travellers. With two additional extracts from my Letters, I will close this record. Why is it (it has been asked) that Northern travellers so frequently return from the South with proslavery ideas? Their conversion, I wrote, has already become an argument in favor of slavery. A Yankee renegade, for example, whom I met in
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
can feel no sympathy with the society in the prosperity of which they are forbidden to participate, and no attachment to a government at whose hands they receive nothing but injustice. If this should not be sufficient, and the curious and incredulous inquirer should suggest that the contrast which has been adverted to, and which is so manifest, might be traced to a difference of climate, or other causes distinct from slavery itself, permit me to refer him to the two States of Kentucky and Ohio. No difference of soil, no diversity of climate, no diversity in the original settlement of those two States can account for the remarkable disproportion in their natural advancement. Separated by a river alone, they seem to have been purposely and providentially designed to exhibit in their future histories, the difference which naturally results from a country free, and a country afflicted with the curse of slavery. The same may be said of the two States of Missouri and Illinois. Sur
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ursel's. Do you work for your boss, or are you hired out? I asked. I works for de boss. What kind of time do you have with him? Bery hard mass'r, bery hard. He works us all day, and neber ‘lows us anyding for oursel's at all from Christmas to Christmas. What! Don't he give you a present at Christmas? No, mass'r, not a cent. Some bosses do ‘low someding at Christmas; but not my boss. He doesn't even gib us ‘bacca to chaw. He was carrying a bag in which his day's provising, pumping, wood cutting, engine firing, and in other necessary labors along the line. These men are the most favored sons of Africa employed in the country, in the States of Alabama or Georgia. They are hard worked from sun to sun, and from Christmas to Christmas, but they are well fed and clothed, and comfortably lodged — comfortably, that is, for negro slaves. Their allowance. They receive five pounds of pork, a pint of molasses, and one peck of meal each per week; three suits of c
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