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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
men, remained, and were captured. The number of guns captured was about one hundred and forty-six--all of which were batteries of light artillery, except the heavy guns mounted in the Fort and water--batteries. There were also from ten to fifteen thousand stand of small arms, the larger part of which are shot-guns, rifles, and flint-lock muskets. The regiments which surrendered were as follows: Col. Gants' battalion, Ninth Tennessee cavalry, eight hundred men. Forrest's brigade, Louisiana cavalry, one thousand one hundred men. Forty-ninth Tennessee infantry, Col. Bailey. Thirtieth Tennessee, Col. J. M. Head. Fifty-third Tennessee, Col. Vorhees. Fiftieth Tennessee, Col. Abernethy. Tenth Tennessee, Col. Hieman. First battalion, Col. Colms. Fifty-first Tennessee, Col. Suggs. Fourteenth Mississippi, Col.----. Fourth Mississippi, Col. Drake. Third Mississippi, Col.----. Twentieth Mississippi, Col.----. Twentieth Kentucky, Col.----. Third Tennessee, Col. Brown. O
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
e detailed particulars of the surrender of Fort Donelson, and its cordon of field-works, the departing mail allows me no time to speak of. G. W. B. Secession Narratives. Personne, the correspondent of the Charleston Courier, writes from Augusta, Ga., under date of February twenty-first, as follows: It has been my good fortune to enjoy an interview with Lieut. F. H. Duquecron, one of the officers engaged in the recent battle of Fort Donelson, who has arrived here disabled by a wound in opportunity afforded the narrator for seeing the general movements upon an extended battle-field, it will not be devoid of interest, and may possibly shed fresh light upon the sad reverse we have experienced. Richmond dispatch account. Augusta, Ga., Feb. 22, 1862. I have just obtained the following particulars of the fight at Fort Donelson from an eye-witness and participant, which will doubtless be welcome to the readers of the Dispatch as the first news from a Southern source. Fo
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
y hill on the right — the finishing blow to a victory which has already purged Kentucky of treason, and restored Tennessee to the confederacy of our fathers. All hon some advantage on the right of the whole line. Reenforcements, consisting of Kentucky and Indiana troops, had been sent forward past my position to support the righ Third Mississippi infantry, First regiment Texas infantry, Eighth regiment of Kentucky infantry, and a battalion of Forest cavalry, (Texas.) The hill was covered at the welcome went reverberating over the hills, till from the long distances in Kentucky it came back like a whisper. In turn the bands on the boats charmed the ear wsed, while the keen eyes that flashed along the rifle-barrels of Tennessee and Kentucky, allowed no Federal invader to escape the well-directed bullets which flew frore was our little army of eighteen thousand, composed of the men of Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama, confronted by an army of at least f
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
my, about eighteen thousand strong, were on the move to the eastward. The character of the movement of the army from Fort Henry will probably be best understood by the following orders of the night previous: headquarters District of Cairo, Fort Henry, Tenn., Feb. 11, 1862. General field orders, No. 12. The troops designated in General Field Orders, No. 9, will move to-morrow, as speedily as possible, in the following order: One brigade of the first division will move by the Telegraph road directly upon Fort Donelson, halting for further orders at a distance of two miles from the Fort. The other brigades of the first division will move by the Dover Ridge road, and halt at the same distance from the Fort, and throw out troops so as to form a continuous line between the two wings. The two brigades of the second division now at Fort Henry will follow as rapidly as practicable, by the Dover road, and will be followed by the troops from Fort Heiman, as fast as they can b
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
e Tenth Tennessee, under command of Lieut.-Col. McGavock, Col. Voorhies', (Tenn.,) Col. Hughes', (Ala.,) and Col. Head's (Tenn.) regiments of Tennessee Volunteers, and Capt. Maney's field-battery. ntieth Mississippi, Col.----. Twentieth Kentucky, Col.----. Third Tennessee, Col. Brown. One Alabama regiment, Col. Hughes. Second Kentucky, Col.----. There were in addition to this force a laeighteen thousand, composed of the men of Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama, confronted by an army of at least fifty thousand of the best fighting stock of the North and Wd Bushrod R. Johnson. Most of the regiments were from Tennessee and Mississippi, but Virginia, Alabama, Texas, and Arkansas also contributed their quota, and swelled the dimensions of the army to th 8thdo.Burnett,Lt.-Col. Lyon,3001960 7thTexas.Gregg,------3002030 15thArk.Gee,------270717 27thAla.Hughes,------21601 1stMiss.Simonton,Lt.-Col. Hamilton2801776 3ddo.Davidson,Lt.-Col. Wells,500519
Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
egiment Illinois Vols. Report of Col. Morgan L. Smith. headquarters Fifth brigade, Fort Heiman, Ky., February 18, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that on the fifteenth instant, in obprivates. Report of Col. G. F. McGinnis. headquarters Eleventh Regt. Indiana Vols., Fort Heiman, Ky., February 19, 1862. Col. Morgan L. Smith, Commanding Fifth Brigade, Gen. C. F. Smith's Divily, George T. McGinnis, Colonel Eleventh Indiana. headquarters Eleventh regiment Indiana, Fort Heiman, Ky., February 19, 1862. Col. M. L. Smith, Commanding Fifth Brigade: sir: In accordance with follow as rapidly as practicable, by the Dover road, and will be followed by the troops from Fort Heiman, as fast as they can be ferried across the river. One brigade of the second division shoul80612 49thdo.Bailey,------300413 30thdo.Head,------6541130 18thdo.Palmer,------615440 10thdo.Heiman------75015 26thdo.Lillards,------4001135 41stdo.Farquaharson------45026 32ddo.Cooke,------558
Clarksville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
as not occupied on Wednesday last. Meanwhile, the government officers and citizens have been active in removing the most valuable articles that could be transported, and the Yankees have undoubtedly found a very inconsiderable share of the booty they expected. I forgot to add, in its proper place above, that the names of our killed and wounded are not yet known, but from several sources I have made the following brief list: Killed.--Lieut.-Col. Clough, Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, Clarksville, Tenn.; Capt. May, Memphis; Capt. Porter, Nashville. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment.--Judge Rogers, Monroe Co., Miss.; Sergt. Jno. Clark, Sergt. John Montgomery, R. M. Bell, J. G. Watt, George James. Wounded.--Major Hewitt, Second Kentucky regiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; Capt. Gholson, Fourteenth Mississippi; Lieut. Duquecron, Fourteenth Mississippi. In company C, of the last-named regiment, seventeen were killed and wou
Dover Ridge (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
owing orders of the night previous: headquarters District of Cairo, Fort Henry, Tenn., Feb. 11, 1862. General field orders, No. 12. The troops designated in General Field Orders, No. 9, will move to-morrow, as speedily as possible, in the following order: One brigade of the first division will move by the Telegraph road directly upon Fort Donelson, halting for further orders at a distance of two miles from the Fort. The other brigades of the first division will move by the Dover Ridge road, and halt at the same distance from the Fort, and throw out troops so as to form a continuous line between the two wings. The two brigades of the second division now at Fort Henry will follow as rapidly as practicable, by the Dover road, and will be followed by the troops from Fort Heiman, as fast as they can be ferried across the river. One brigade of the second division should be thrown into Dover to cut off all retreat by the river, if found practicable to do so. The forc
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
s battery, was three regiments of infantry and a squadron of horse, which were repulsed by one regiment of our infantry, the First Nebraska, and the Chicago battery. The enemy also admit a large number of killed and wounded in this action. The Nebraska regiment had but three killed and seven wounded. The enemy poured volley after volley upon us, but fortunately aimed too high to do much execution. The Nebraska regiment being the only one engaged at this time, I was with it during the action, Nebraska regiment being the only one engaged at this time, I was with it during the action, and am pleased to be able to say that every officer and soldier behaved very gallantly throughout. I cannot omit to speak, in high terms, of the soldierly bearing and efficient conduct of Lieut.-Col. McCord and Major Livingston, during the engagement. Col. Wood and his regiment were also exposed to the full fire of the enemy, and their position was rendered the more trying as I had directed them. not to fire until ordered forward for that purpose, if the emergency should arise, which, howev
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
ral order no. 2. headquarters District of West-Tenn., Fort Donelson, Feb. 17, 1862. The General ady purged Kentucky of treason, and restored Tennessee to the confederacy of our fathers. All honorst brigade, Third division, Department West-Tennessee, Fort Henry, February 18, 1862. To Capt Fredird division of the army, Department of West-Tennessee, Fort Henry, February 18, 1862. Captain: Brigade, Third Division, Department of West-Tennessee. To Capt. Fred. Knefler, A. A.A. General, Thmand of Lieut.-Col. McGavock, Col. Voorhies', (Tenn.,) Col. Hughes', (Ala.,) and Col. Head's (Tenn.eyes that flashed along the rifle-barrels of Tennessee and Kentucky, allowed no Federal invader to of eighteen thousand, composed of the men of Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Texas, Mississippi and d's brigade and several from Mississippi and Tennessee. It was in one of these charges that LieuR. Johnson. Most of the regiments were from Tennessee and Mississippi, but Virginia, Alabama, Texa[2 more...]
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