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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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March 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 70
Doc. 68.-the steamer Nashville: how she ran the blockade. Petersburgh, March 1, 1862. The confederate States steamer Nashville reached Beaufort, N. C., yesterday morning, at seven A. M., from Southampton, having successfully eluded the blockading steamers at the entrance of the harbor, one of which, the Albatross, it is supposed, fired some twenty or thirty shots at her without effect. She brings about three millions dollars' worth of stores, chiefly for the use of the Treasury and Post-Office Departments. From an officer of the Nashville we gather the following account of the trip: Leaving Southampton at four P. M., on the third of February, within full sight of the Tuscarora, which had but just returned from a six days cruise outside of the harbor, and was then engaged in coaling-up, the Nashville steered for Bermuda, and, after successfully weathering a terrific gale of six days duration, which disabled one of her engines, reached her destination at two P. M., on th
the order. The Sumter was at Gibraltar at latest accounts. She had captured twenty-one Yankee vessels, nearly all of which were subsequently destroyed. The arrival of the Nashville creates great rejoicing here. The news she brings has restored the cheerful spirits of our people, and inspired them with renewed hopes. Some disappointment was expressed by almost everybody that the Nashville brought no arms from Europe for the use of our government. When, however, it is recollected that the Nashville was tolerated in English waters, and protected from destruction by the neutrality and courtesy of the British government, our readers will at once perceive that to have taken in a cargo of war material such as had been interdicted by the Queen's proclamation, would have been a gross violation not only of hospitality, but of courtesy and the laws of neutrality. The Nashville, it must be remembered, is a government war-ship, and not a merchantman. --Richmond Enquirer Extra, March 1.
February 22nd (search for this): chapter 70
ly, by Belgium. The following is a list of the officers of the Nashville: Commander.--R. P. Pegram. Lieutenants.--J. W. Bennett, and W. C. Whittle. Acting-Master.--J. H. Ingraham, Jr. Paymaster.--Richard Taylor. Surgeon.--J. L. Ancrum. Midshipmen.--Cary, Dalton, Pegram, (son of the commander,) Sinclair, Hamilton, Bullock, McClintock, and Thomas. Captain's Clerk.--------Hasell. Her crew consists of sixty men. The Nashville brings the intelligence, that on February twenty-second, an order was officially promulgated at Bermuda, prohibiting to the United States Government the use of the port as a coal depot. Several schooners laden with coal reached Bermuda a few days before the promulgation of the order. The Sumter was at Gibraltar at latest accounts. She had captured twenty-one Yankee vessels, nearly all of which were subsequently destroyed. The arrival of the Nashville creates great rejoicing here. The news she brings has restored the cheerful spirit
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 70
. C., yesterday morning, at seven A. M., from Southampton, having successfully eluded the blockading steamers at the entrance of the harbor, one of which, the Albatross, it is supposed, fired some twenty or thirty shots at her without effect. She brings about three millions dollars' worth of stores, chiefly for the use of the Treasury and Post-Office Departments. From an officer of the Nashville we gather the following account of the trip: Leaving Southampton at four P. M., on the third of February, within full sight of the Tuscarora, which had but just returned from a six days cruise outside of the harbor, and was then engaged in coaling-up, the Nashville steered for Bermuda, and, after successfully weathering a terrific gale of six days duration, which disabled one of her engines, reached her destination at two P. M., on the twentieth, without having caught so much as a glimpse even of the eight vessels of war which had been expressly detailed by the Lincoln Government to effec
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