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baggage, stores and tents were to be left, and the weak and sick were to remain as camp-guards. Already our pickets had been relieved by the First division of the Third corps, and the extra rations issued. We at once concluded that this was no false alarm. Saturday morning came, as bright and beautiful as ever winter saw. The roads were in splendid condition, the men in good trim, and all was propitious. Off we started at the appointed time, moving by way of Culpeper in the direction of Madison. James City, a point ten miles west of Culpeper, and sixteen miles from camp, was reached by half-past 4 P. M., and here we bivouacked for the night. The grassy plains and groves of pine around were fired, and the bands played their liveliest airs. The Sabbath dawned with promise, and the sun smiled propitiously as we moved forward to Robertson's River, which was reached by the advance at eleven A. M. Here the cavalry pickets of the enemy were met, but hastily betook themselves to the s
Doc. 133.-General Custer's expedition toward Charlottesville, Va. Culpeper Court-house, Va., Wednesday Morning, March 2, 1864. General Custer's reconnoitring expedition returned to camp last night after having completed, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New-York, and First New-Jersey cavalry, in all, one thousand five hundred men, passed through Madison Court-House early that morning. One section of Captain French's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Porter, accompanied the cavalry. The troops were in light marching order, and moved rapidly toward Stannardsville, distant south-west from Madison twelve miles, crossing the Rapidan at Banks's Mills Ford. At Stannardsville the enemy's pickets were discovered, who
eport their officers to have been in a great state of trepidation, believing a monster raid in progress on their left. Confirmation is also had in the fact that a large number of troops were concentrated around Charlottesville to resist our advance. Among our captures are sixty prisoners and a number of valuable horses. Three flouring-mills, six caissons, two forges, a complete set of artillery-harness, and eight wagons loaded with commissary stores, were destroyed during the raid. Captain Paine, of the Topographical Engineers, accompanied the expedition for the purpose of making observations, and gained very important and valuable information appertaining to his department. We lost none in killed, and but ten or twelve wounded. We lost none in prisoners. Another account. headquarters Second Rhode-Island volunteers, Brandy Station, March 8, 1864. On Friday evening, the twenty-sixth ultimo, our entire corps, the Sixth, together with the Third division of the Third, r
and eight wagons loaded with commissary stores, were destroyed during the raid. Captain Paine, of the Topographical Engineers, accompanied the expedition for the purpose of making observations, and gained very important and valuable information appertaining to his department. We lost none in killed, and but ten or twelve wounded. We lost none in prisoners. Another account. headquarters Second Rhode-Island volunteers, Brandy Station, March 8, 1864. On Friday evening, the twenty-sixth ultimo, our entire corps, the Sixth, together with the Third division of the Third, received orders to be prepared to move early on Saturday morning with five days rations and forty rounds of ammunition. All baggage, stores and tents were to be left, and the weak and sick were to remain as camp-guards. Already our pickets had been relieved by the First division of the Third corps, and the extra rations issued. We at once concluded that this was no false alarm. Saturday morning came, as b
March 8th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 144
forges, a complete set of artillery-harness, and eight wagons loaded with commissary stores, were destroyed during the raid. Captain Paine, of the Topographical Engineers, accompanied the expedition for the purpose of making observations, and gained very important and valuable information appertaining to his department. We lost none in killed, and but ten or twelve wounded. We lost none in prisoners. Another account. headquarters Second Rhode-Island volunteers, Brandy Station, March 8, 1864. On Friday evening, the twenty-sixth ultimo, our entire corps, the Sixth, together with the Third division of the Third, received orders to be prepared to move early on Saturday morning with five days rations and forty rounds of ammunition. All baggage, stores and tents were to be left, and the weak and sick were to remain as camp-guards. Already our pickets had been relieved by the First division of the Third corps, and the extra rations issued. We at once concluded that this was
March 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 144
Doc. 133.-General Custer's expedition toward Charlottesville, Va. Culpeper Court-house, Va., Wednesday Morning, March 2, 1864. General Custer's reconnoitring expedition returned to camp last night after having completed, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth ostensible purpose, the whole character and manner of the move indicates that it was but a feint to draw attention and forces in this direction while other and more important movements are made elsewhere. Another account. Washington, March 2, 1864. General Custer, with one thousand five hundred picked men, in light marching order, left Culpeper Court-House about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. The Sixth and Third corps marched from their winter quarters earlier in the day. The f
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