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The division fought heroically and well, but fought in vain. Garland, in my immediate front, showed all his wonted courage and enthusiasm, but he needed and asked for reenforcements. I sent Lt.-Col. Newton, 6th Ga., to his support, and, observing a brigade by a fence in our rear, I galloped back to it and found it to be that of Gen. Toombs. I ordered it forward to support Garland, and accompanied it. The brigade advanced handsomely to the brow of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gained considerable ground, but was forced back. The gallant and accomplished Meares, 3d N. C., Ripley's brigade, had fallen at the head of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of troops near the parsonage on the Quaker road, suffering
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 9
getting off. Press forward your whole line and follow up Armistead's success. Under Magruder's orders the advance was' commenced by Wright's Ga. and La. brigade, followed by Mahone's Va. brigade, both of Huger's division. These two brigades formed our extreme right, and went into action only about 2500 strong, many stragglers having been lost from the ranks in the marchings and skirmishes of the three previous days. To the left of Wright was Armistead of Huger's division, followed by Cobb's and Semmes's brigades. In support of these were all the rest of Magruder's and Huger's 10 brigades, Ransom, of Holmes's division, being also temporarily attached to Huger. Farther to the left came D. H. Hill's five brigades. Magruder's brigades consumed a little time in developing a full roar of musketry, but no sooner was it heard than D. H. Hill's division was also put in. Fitz-John Porter, in Battles and leaders, thus describes the opening of the battle from the Federal point of vi
Dickinson (search for this): chapter 9
, and it was also reported to Lee as he was returning from his reconnoissance with Longstreet. Had Sumner's movement, and the advance and easy retreat of the Federal skirmishers, been planned as a ruse to decoy us into a charge, its success would have been brilliant. That part of our plan which had called for a tremendous preliminary cannonade was forgotten. Lee believed that his enemy was retreating and about to escape him, and he hastened to send a verbal order to Magruder through Capt. Dickinson of Magruder's staff, who wrote the order as follows: — Gen. Lee expects you to advance rapidly. He says it is reported the enemy is getting off. Press forward your whole line and follow up Armistead's success. Under Magruder's orders the advance was' commenced by Wright's Ga. and La. brigade, followed by Mahone's Va. brigade, both of Huger's division. These two brigades formed our extreme right, and went into action only about 2500 strong, many stragglers having been lost from
. Longstreet and Hill were in reserve behind Magruder; and Ewell's and Jackson's own division, behind Jackson. The enemy's dying comrades. . . . Early on the morning of July 2, Gen. Ewell rode upon the field, and coming to the position where mythe parsonage, already overcrowded with troops. Finally Gen. Ewell came up, but it was after dark, and nothing could be accongstreet were close in rear, and Whiting's, Jackson's, and Ewell's divisions were on the left, and Holmes a few miles off on's field. Including with these the losses in Jackson's and Ewell's divisions and Lawton's brigade, the casualties were 599. at Gaines Mill, and 104 at Malvern. Lawton's brigade, and Ewell's and Whiting's divisions, had only been severely engaged ao brigades of Magruder's. Jackson was also up with his own, Ewell's, Whiting's, and D. H. Hill's divisions. Lee did not reac71751192 Jackson's Div.391117208 Lawton's Brig.149275567 Ewell's Div.4764223987 D. H.Hill's Div.558614231743153767 Margr
Armistead (search for this): chapter 9
Batteries have been established to rake the enemy's line. If it is broken, as is probable, Armistead, who can witness the effect of the fire, has been ordered to charge with a yell. Do the same.ssively severe upon the supporting troops. Of the artillery fighting on the right flank, Gen. Armistead reported: — By a reconnoissance first made by Col. E. C. Edmonds of the 38th Va. . . . Iand troops. About the same time, a body of the enemy's skirmishers being advanced in front of Armistead's brigade, was attacked and easily driven back by three of his regiments. These followed the He says it is reported the enemy is getting off. Press forward your whole line and follow up Armistead's success. Under Magruder's orders the advance was' commenced by Wright's Ga. and La. brigranks in the marchings and skirmishes of the three previous days. To the left of Wright was Armistead of Huger's division, followed by Cobb's and Semmes's brigades. In support of these were all t
total losses 5965 or more; those of the enemy could scarcely have reached 2000, but the casualties of different battles are not separated. Of Jackson's part in this action there is very little to be said. He took no initiative, though complying promptly with orders or requests as received. But had he been the Jackson of the Valley, being on the left flank that morning, he would have turned Malvern Hill by his left, and taken position commanding the road somewhere beyond Turkey Creek. Malvern should not have been attacked; only the enemy observed and held by Longstreet, while Jackson got a position which they would be forced to assault. Lee's report sums up the subsequent operations briefly, as follows: — On July 2, it was discovered that the enemy had withdrawn during the night, leaving the ground covered with his dead and wounded, and his route exhibiting abundant evidence of precipitate retreat. The pursuit was commenced, Gen. Stuart with his cavalry in the advance,
was to throw the troops into the woods and ravines on the left of the plateau, and necessarily throw them into great confusion. . . . In the meantime Gen. Kershaw came into the field with his brigade, near one of my regiments, the 2d Ga., which still remained in very good order; and my adjutant, Capt. Du Bose, proposed to him to unite that, and some other companies of other regiments, with his command in the attack on the enemy's batteries, to which he assented; and this command, under Cols. Butt and Holmes, accompanied by Capt. Du Bose and Maj. Alexander (my quartermaster, who acted as one of my aides on the field) advanced with Gen. Kershaw's brigade beyond the edge of the wood into the open field, but, under the destructive fire of the enemy's cannon and small-arms, wavered and fell back into the road skirting the pine thicket. . . . My losses were very severe, the total being 194 killed and wounded, out of about 1200 carried into action. I am happy to add that the disorders
J. G. Ransom (search for this): chapter 9
o of his own). D. H. Hill came next with five, then two of Huger's, six of Magruder's, and two more of Huger's, including Ransom's, detached from Holmes's division. The remainder of Holmes's was held on the River road, and was not engaged. Longstre, followed by Cobb's and Semmes's brigades. In support of these were all the rest of Magruder's and Huger's 10 brigades, Ransom, of Holmes's division, being also temporarily attached to Huger. Farther to the left came D. H. Hill's five brigades. Md of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of trond Lawton's brigade, the casualties were 599. In Magruder's division the casualties were 2014, and in Huger's, including Ransom's brigade, 1609. In Rodes's, Colquitt's, and Ripley's brigades of D. H. Hill's division, the casualties were making 889,
d from gunboats. Of course, there was much commotion in the Federal camps, but the actual damage done was trifling. Some 40 casualties are reported among the Federals, and two or three among the Confederate artillerists. The next day the Federals established themselves on the South Side. The strategic advantages of a position astraddle of the James River have already been referred to (page 61, Chap. III.), but they were not yet generally appreciated. Fortunately for us, Lincoln and Halleck recalled McClellan and his army to Washington without ever realizing them; although McClellan had tried hard to impress them upon his superiors. Fortunately, too, for us, Gen. S. G. French, in command at Petersburg, saw and appreciated the threat of the position, and immediately began the construction of a line of intrenchments about that city. These intrenchments, in 1864, defeated some attempts at surprise; and at last enabled Beauregard, with two divisions, to withstand the attack of G
W. N. Pendleton (search for this): chapter 9
attle of Malvern Hill Enemy's New position. line formed. Pendleton's artillery. artillery combats. Whiting's report. Sumner seeksld act upon both flanks; but here our organization broke down. Gen. Pendleton, Lee's Chief of Artillery, had a large artillery reserve, organe. Between the lines one can but read a disappointing story. Pendleton did not find Lee all day long, nor did any orders from Lee find ht out, one by one, in the face of many guns already in position. Pendleton's battalions of from three to six batteries each, would have stoo matters were, our whole reserve artillery stood idle all day. Pendleton graduated at West Point in 1830, one year after Lee. He resigned ee was persuaded to authorize an expedition for the purpose under Pendleton's supervision. On July 12 some 47 rifled guns were collected, 1531 A. P. Hill's Div.6764268875084210 Holmes's Div.3499178677 Pendleton's Art.22 Stuart's Cav.7171 Totals 10 Divisions39135083584413305
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