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Eugene Ruhl (search for this): chapter 15
dford, and determined to send her to New Orleans. Being loth to part with any more of my officers, after the experience I had had, with the prize brig Cuba, I selected an intelligent quartermaster, who had been mate of a merchantman, as prize-master. My men I could replace—my officers I could not. The following letter of instructions was prepared for the guidance of the prizemaster: Confederate States steamer Sumter, off Puerto Cabello, July 26, 1861. quartermaster and prize-master, Eugene Ruhl: You will take charge of the prize schooner, Abby Bradford, and proceed with her, to New Orleans—making the land to the westward of the passes of the Mississippi, and endeavoring to run into Barrataria Bay, Berwick's Bay, or some of the other small inlets. Upon your arrival, you will proceed to the city of New Orleans, in person, and report yourself to Commodore Rousseau, for orders. You will take especial care of the accompanying package of papers, as they are the papers of the
John Smith (search for this): chapter 15
roprietor, and was doing a thriving business, far away from war's alarms, and a New Yorker had the monopoly of taking all the phizes of the staid old Dutchmen —John Smith, of New York, Photographer, hanging high above the artist's windows, on a sign-board that evidently had not been painted by a Curacoan. Mr. Smith had already tMr. Smith had already taken an excellent photograph of the Sumter, which he naively enough told me, was intended for the New York illustrated papers. If I had had ever so much objection, to having the likeness of my ship hung up in such a rogues' gallery, I had no means of preventing it. Besides, it could do us but little damage, in the way of identificses. The American Consul, who is also a merchant, represents not only those grand moral ideas, that characterize our Northern people, but Sand's sarsaparilla, and Smith's wooden clocks. He is, par excellence, the big dog of the village. The big dog was present on the present occasion, looking portentous, and savage, and when he
emaster: Confederate States steamer Sumter, off Puerto Cabello, July 26, 1861. quartermaster and prize-master, Eugene Ruhl: You will take charge of the prize schooner, Abby Bradford, and proceed with her, to New Orleans—making the land to the westward of the passes of the Mississippi, and endeavoring to run into Barrataria Bay, Berwick's Bay, or some of the other small inlets. Upon your arrival, you will proceed to the city of New Orleans, in person, and report yourself to Commodore Rousseau, for orders. You will take especial care of the accompanying package of papers, as they are the papers of the captured schooner, and you will deliver them, with the seals unbroken, to the judge of the Prize Court, Judge Moise. You will batten down your hatches, and see that no part of the cargo is touched, during the voyage, and you will deliver both vessel, and cargo, to the proper law officers, in the condition in which you find them, as nearly as possible. I availed myself of
Abby Bradford (search for this): chapter 15
e enemy's coasts. Hence the neglect of the owners of the Bradford, in not providing her with some good English, or Spanish he quartermaster's bag described a few pages back. The Bradford being bound for Puerto Cabello, and that port being but asibility of Yankee privateers chasing them. Taking the Bradford in tow, then, we squared away for Puerto Cabello, but darabout seventy miles to the northward and eastward. The Abby Bradford is the property of citizens of the United States, with ment; and that, in the mean time, I had better take the Abby Bradford and get out of Puerto Cabello, as soon as possible! Thred it. The next morning I sent a prize crew on board the Bradford, and determined to send her to New Orleans. Being loth te, having made nine captures in twenty-six days. The Bradford reached the coast of Louisiana, in due time, but approachible complication with neutrals. Having dispatched the Bradford, we got under way, in the Sumter, to continue our cruise.
Golden Rocket (search for this): chapter 15
not so constantly fresh, within the last few days. Having taken sights for our chronometers, on the morning after our arrival, and again to-day, I have been enabled to verify their rates. They are running very well. The chronometer of the Golden Rocket proves to be a good instrument. We fix the longitude of Curacoa to be 68° 58′ 80″, west of Greenwich. July 24th.—Sky occasionally obscured, with a moderate trade-wind. Our men have all returned from their visits to the shore, except one,nd that I only resorted to this practice, when it became evident that there was nothing else to be done. Not that I had not the right to burn them, under the laws of war, when there was no dispute about the property— as was the case with the Golden Rocket, she having had no cargo on board—but because I desired to avoid all possible complication with neutrals. Having dispatched the Bradford, we got under way, in the Sumter, to continue our cruise. We had scarcely gotten clear of the har
Don Mariano Dias (search for this): chapter 15
mter must, long since, have departed, to hunt her in some other quarter. Upon your arrival, you will inform the Governor, or Commandant of the Port, of the fact, state to him that your vessel is the prize of a ship of war, and not of a privateer, and ask leave for her to remain in port, in charge of a prize agent, until she can be adjudicated by a prize court of the Confederate States. Should he grant you this request, you will, if you go into Cienfuegos, put the vessel in charge of Don Mariano Dias, our agent for the other prizes; but should you go into either of the other ports, you will appoint some reliable person to take charge of the prize, but without power to sell, until further orders—taking from him a bond, with sufficient sureties for the faithful performance of his duties. Should the Governor decline to permit the prize to remain, you will store the cargo, with some responsible person, if permitted to land it, taking his receipt therefor, and then take the ship outs
Stephen R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 15
ccompanying package of papers, as they are the papers of the captured schooner, and you will deliver them, with the seals unbroken, to the judge of the Prize Court, Judge Moise. You will batten down your hatches, and see that no part of the cargo is touched, during the voyage, and you will deliver both vessel, and cargo, to the proper law officers, in the condition in which you find them, as nearly as possible. I availed myself of this opportunity, to address the following letter to Mr. Mallory, the Secretary of the Navy; having nothing very important to communicate, I did not resort to the use of the cipher, that had been established between us. Confederate States steamer Sumter, Puerto Cabello, July 26, 1861. Sir:—Having captured a schooner of light draught, which, with her cargo, I estimate to be worth some twenty-five thousand dollars, and being denied the privilege of leaving her at this port, until she could be adjudicated, I have resolved to dispatch her for
—making the land to the westward of the passes of the Mississippi, and endeavoring to run into Barrataria Bay, Berwick's Bay, or some of the other small inlets. Upon your arrival, you will proceed to the city of New Orleans, in person, and report yourself to Commodore Rousseau, for orders. You will take especial care of the accompanying package of papers, as they are the papers of the captured schooner, and you will deliver them, with the seals unbroken, to the judge of the Prize Court, Judge Moise. You will batten down your hatches, and see that no part of the cargo is touched, during the voyage, and you will deliver both vessel, and cargo, to the proper law officers, in the condition in which you find them, as nearly as possible. I availed myself of this opportunity, to address the following letter to Mr. Mallory, the Secretary of the Navy; having nothing very important to communicate, I did not resort to the use of the cipher, that had been established between us.
esh, within the last few days. Having taken sights for our chronometers, on the morning after our arrival, and again to-day, I have been enabled to verify their rates. They are running very well. The chronometer of the Golden Rocket proves to be a good instrument. We fix the longitude of Curacoa to be 68° 58′ 80″, west of Greenwich. July 24th.—Sky occasionally obscured, with a moderate trade-wind. Our men have all returned from their visits to the shore, except one, a simple lad named Orr, who, as I learn, has been seduced away, by a Yankee skipper, in port, aided by the Boston hotel-keeper, and our particular friend, the consul. As these persons have tampered with my whole crew, I am gratified to know, that there has been but one traitor found among them. We had now been a week in Curacoa, during which time, besides recruiting, and refreshing my crew, I had made all the necessary preparations for another cruise. The ship had been thoroughly overhauled, inside and out, an
William A. Hicks (search for this): chapter 15
e had some neutral cargo on board, and this I had no right to destroy. I resolved, therefore, to send her in; not to the Confederate States, for she drew too much water to enter any, except the principal ports, and these being all blockaded, by steamers, it was useless for her to make the attempt. The following letter of instructions to her prize-master, will show what disposition was made of her. Confederate States steamer Sumter, at sea, July 27, 1861. midshipman and prize-master Wm. A. Hicks:— You will take charge of the prize bark, Joseph Maxwell, and proceed, with her, to some port on the south side of the island of Cuba, say St. Jago, Trinidad, or Cienfuegos. I think it would be safest for you to go into Cienfuegos, as the enemy, from the very fact of our having been there, recently, will scarcely be on the look for us a second time. The steamers which were probably sent thither from Havana in pursuit of the Sumter must, long since, have departed, to hunt her in
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