hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 3,199 167 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 638 0 Browse Search
Florida (Florida, United States) 544 0 Browse Search
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) 520 4 Browse Search
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 480 26 Browse Search
Headquarters (Washington, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 382 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 368 54 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 356 0 Browse Search
Comdg 353 131 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

Found 1,010 total hits in 183 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
lost, and the Confederacy, now cut in two, would then be cut in three. Meanwhile, Meade, having been reinforced by the new levies of the enemy, and taking his time to organize and discipline them, would retake the offensive, and Lee would be driven back towards Richmond, admitting that his supplies would enable him to maintain his army that long on the south side of the Potomac; or a large army might be concentrated here, and, having taken this place and marched into the interior, towards Augusta, the Confederacy would again be subdivided; or, should the enemy find it impossible or too tedious to take Charleston, he might concentrate again his forces on the coast of North Carolina, and, marching to Raleigh or Weldon, would cut off all our present communications with Virginia. The question now arises, can these calamities be avoided, and in what way? If my opinion for once could be listened to, I would say again, act entirely on the defensive in Virginia, send you immediately 25,
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e, and Lee would be driven back towards Richmond, admitting that his supplies would enable him to maintain his army that long on the south side of the Potomac; or a large army might be concentrated here, and, having taken this place and marched into the interior, towards Augusta, the Confederacy would again be subdivided; or, should the enemy find it impossible or too tedious to take Charleston, he might concentrate again his forces on the coast of North Carolina, and, marching to Raleigh or Weldon, would cut off all our present communications with Virginia. The question now arises, can these calamities be avoided, and in what way? If my opinion for once could be listened to, I would say again, act entirely on the defensive in Virginia, send you immediately 25,000 men from Lee's army, 5000 or 10,000 more from Johnston's forces, to enable you to take the offensive forthwith, and cross the Tennessee to crush Rosecrans before he can be reinforced to any large extent from any quarter.
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
se the two—transportation and harbor police—should be under the control of the same head. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 14th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed by the Commanding General to ask you the following questions, and direct the execution of the following orders: 1st. Are the roads and bridges from Fort Pemberton, along the Stono, to the upper batteries near the Overflow in good condition? If not, they should at once be so made. All those batteries and those in rear of the Overflow must be connected, as soon as practicable, by a good wagon-road, passing not far in their rear along the shortest lines. 2d. Have you yet made arrangements about employing those officers and sailors from Richmond for guarding the harbor at night, and for communicating with Sullivan's Island, in case of necessity?<
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
D. B. Harris, Lieut.-Col. and Chief-Engr. of Dept. Incomplete, though sufficient in many respects, as was this hurried examination of Sumter, it confirmed General Beauregard in his determination already taken, that the fort should not be evacuated. He therefore approved the conclusions arrived at by Colonels Gilmer and Harris, and began his arrangements accordingly. The Artillery Department, he considered, had accomplished its task in the defence of that post—the entrance-gate of Charleston Harbor—and it now devolved upon the infantry arm of the service, aided by labor, the pick, spade, and shovel, to perform the part required of them, until, if possible, other heavy guns could be mounted, under cover, amid the ruins that still bade defiance to the combined attacks of the land and naval forces of the enemy. It was a grave responsibility to assume, but General Beauregard resolutely took it upon himself; and thus, through him and those who defended Sumter, does its record remain,
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ted. 4th. That you turn over, temporarily, to Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N., for army transportation and guard purposes in the harbor, all row-boats, barges, etc., not required for your current wants, taking proper receipts. 5th. That, as soon as possible, you have removed from Fort Sumter all the lead, copper, good carriages, and chassis, etc., especially the carriage and chassis of the 11-inch gun now required in the city. 6th. That you have reconstructed the observatory at Secessionville, and also erect one near Battery Cheves or Haskell. 7th. That the commanding officer at Fort Johnson be directed to employ actively the troops there in constructing bomb-proofs and rifle-pits. 8th. That Colonel Butler, at Moultrie, be directed to employ actively as many of his regiment as practicable in removing the debris from the interior, to throw over the parapet into the ditch of the water-face, under the direction of the Engineer Department, to form a chemise to the scarp.
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
vitation, having already promised a personal friend—ex-Governor Aiken— to repair to his residence and make of it his headquarters during his short sojourn in Charleston. The President was escorted with all due honor to the City Hall, where he gave a public reception, after delivering an eloquent and patriotic address. He spoke of almost every topic of the war, except one. The defence of Charleston at that time had lasted more than seven months, and, in face of the dreadful reverses of Gettysburg and Vicksburg and the general gloom resulting from them, it alone kept up the hope and spirits of the South. The officers and men had signally distinguished themselves during that desperate and glorious siege. Several of them had been justly recommended for promotion. Yet he found but a single one to praise—Major Stephen D. Elliott, the recently chosen commander of Sumter, placed there after the first bombardment was over and the regular artillery withdrawn. Not one word of General Be<
Waterloo (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
s, through him and those who defended Sumter, does its record remain, from Rhett to Elliott, from Elliott to Mitchel and Huguenin, and the men who fought under them, a grand story of engineering skill, soldierly daring, fortitude, and endurance. Thus, also, as was eloquently said by General B. H-. Rutledge, in an address delivered in Charleston, November 30th, 1882, on the occasion of the unveiling of the Confederate monument in Charleston. While Greece has her Thermopylae, England her Waterloo, the United States her Yorktown, South Carolina has her Fort Sumter. As soon, therefore, as most of its heavy guns, including those which the enemy's land-batteries on Morris Island had disabled and those which were previously removed, to prevent further loss, had been transferred to the inner circle of fortifications, the following order was given to the Commander of the First Military District: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 27th, 1863.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ignal officer, Captain Manigault, to endeavor to make out the meaning of the signals exchanged between the Federal land and naval forces. This, however, Captain Manigault was unable to do; then, at the suggestion of General Beauregard, another expedient was resorted to—namely, the capture of one of the enemy's advanced signal-pickets, in the Third Military District. This picket was brought to Charleston, and from him, through the devices of Captain Pliny Bryan, Captain Pliny Bryan, of Maryland, was a member of the Legislature of that State at the beginning of the war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwards, appointed in the Adjutant-General's Department. He was active, intelligent, zealous, and did good service during the siege of Charleston. He died in the summer of 1864, from exposure to the sun while in the performance of his duties. A. A. G., the much-desired key was finally secured. This important discovery was of incalculable advantag
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ic work. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 7th, 1863. General Braxton Bragg, Commanding near Chattanooga, Tenn.: Dear General,—I have just been informed from Richmond that the Army of Virginia is about to take the offensive again, to prevent Meade from reinforcing Rosecrans, thus repeating, to a certain extent, the campaign of last July into Pennsylvania, which did not save Middle Tennessee and the Mississippi Valley. You must, no doubt, recollect what I wrote on the subject to General Johnston, on the 15th of May See Chapter XXXI. last, to endeavor to prevent that offensive campaign, which, I thought, would not effect the object in view. I now address you my views on the reported intentions of General Lee or the War Department, to see if our small available means cannot be used to a better purpose. It is evident to my mind that, admitting Lee's movement can prev
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ended Sumter, does its record remain, from Rhett to Elliott, from Elliott to Mitchel and Huguenin, and the men who fought under them, a grand story of engineering skill, soldierly daring, fortitude, and endurance. Thus, also, as was eloquently said by General B. H-. Rutledge, in an address delivered in Charleston, November 30th, 1882, on the occasion of the unveiling of the Confederate monument in Charleston. While Greece has her Thermopylae, England her Waterloo, the United States her Yorktown, South Carolina has her Fort Sumter. As soon, therefore, as most of its heavy guns, including those which the enemy's land-batteries on Morris Island had disabled and those which were previously removed, to prevent further loss, had been transferred to the inner circle of fortifications, the following order was given to the Commander of the First Military District: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 27th, 1863. Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...