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China (China) (search for this): chapter 15
ile6,865 BrunswickMeile11,816 CalcuttaCoss2,160 CeylonMile1,760 ChinaLi608.5 DenmarkMul8,288 DresdenPost-meile7,432 EgyptFeddan1.47 Eia sebifera is used for candles by the Chinese. Stillingia sebiferaChina Bassia butyraceaeN. India WalnutJuglans regia, etcEurope and Amerly derived from the pollen of flowers Wax (insect)Fraxinus sinensisChinaA kind of wax deposited by an insect, the coccus pe-la, on the leaveatile oil which dissolves India-rubber. CamphorCamphora officinarumChina, etcA solid essential oil. Used in medicine, etc. CedarCedrus rubrrobably almost identical with those in vogue 3,000 years ago. In China, the pestle and mortar (d) are used in reducing to powder the seeds sprocket-wheel, and falls by gravity. e shows the press used in China in crushing the seeds of the tallow-tree. The weighted wheel is su true theory, considering the sun the center of our system. The Chinese annals state that Tsi-ang-nung, in the reign of Shu-en-ti (126 – 1
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 15
238 MexicoLegua4,638 MilanMigliio1,093.63 MochaMile2,146 NaplesMiglio2,025 NetherlandsMijle1,093.63 Place.Measure.U. S. Yards. NorwayMile12,182 PersiaParasang6,076 PolandMile (long)8,100 PortugalMitha2,250 PortugalVara3.609 PrussiaMile (post)8,238 RomeKilometre1,093.63 RomeMile2,025 RussiaVerst1,166.7 RussiaSashine2.33 SardiniaMiglio2,435 SaxonyMeile (post)7,432 SiamRoenung4,333 SpainLeague legal4,638 SpainLeague, common6,026.24 SpainMilla1,522 SwedenMile11,660 SwitzerlandMeile8,548 TurkeyBerri1,828 TuscanyMiglio1,809 VeniceMiglio1,900 O-don′ta-gra. A form of dental forceps. O-don′to-graph. (Gearing.) An instrument for marking or laying off the teeth of gear-wheels; invented by Professor Willis. It consists of a graduated card or thin board, having one edge beveled at an angle of 75°. This is applied to the radii terminating at the centers of the interspaces between the teeth and the centers from which the curves forming their flanks and
Long Island Sound (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
over adjacent objects and afford an extensive view. Used as a lookout-station for the firealarm service, for signaling, for meteorological observations, etc. The iron observatory on the roof of the Equitable Life Insurance Company, on Broadway, New York, is 22 feet high above the roof of the building, which is 130 feet above the sidewalk. The probabilities of the weather are indicated by balls 12 feet in diameter, displayed upon two signal-staffs and visible from various points on Long Island Sound, Sandy Hook, and the inland waters of the Hudson and Harlem rivers. In the building is a large map, displaying the territory throughout which the service has its stations, reaching from Mexico to Canada, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast. The state of the weather is indicated by dials at each of these stations on the map, from which reports are received every five hours. Ob-stet′ri-cal chair. One capable of affording convenient position for the delivery of the child a
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 15
e air from the range of pipes above it. In organs of the largest class as formerly constructed the operation of the keys was a work requiring, in addition to musical skill, a large amount of hard bodily labor. It is said that the performer on the great Haarlem organ was obliged to strip preparatory to commencing his work, and retired covered with perspiration at the end of the hour's performance. This is one of the largest instruments in Europe, having 60 stops and 8,000 pipes. One at Seville has 5,300 pipes. The expenditure of wind varying greatly, according to the series of notes produced, the tension of the air supply was very different at different times, causing a variation in the purity of the tone and difficulty in opening the valves when under high pressure. These difficulties were remedied by the pneumatic lever of Barker, in which small subsidiary bellows operated by the movement of the key are employed to depress the wires by which the valves are opened. Where an
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 15
2 BengalCoss2,000 BirmahDain4,277 BohemiaLeague (16 to 1°)7,587 BrazilLeague (18 to 1°)6,750 BremenMeile6,865 BrunswickMeile11,816 CalcuttaCoss2,160 CeylonMile1,760 ChinaLi608.5 DenmarkMul8,288 DresdenPost-meile7,432 EgyptFeddan1.47 EnglandMile1,760 FlandersMijle1,093.63 FlorenceMiglio1,809 France 1, 60931 miles = 1 kilometre. Kilometre1,093.6 GenoaMile (post)8,527 GermanyMile (15 to 1°)8,101 GreeceStadium1,083.33 GuineaJacktan4 HamburgMeile8,238 HanoverMeile8,114 HungaryMeile9,139 IndiaWarsa24.89 ItalyMile2,025 JapanInk2.038 LeghornMiglio1,809 LeipsieMeile (post)7,432 LithuaniaMeile9,781 MaltaCanna2.29 MecklenburgMeile8,238 MexicoLegua4,638 MilanMigliio1,093.63 MochaMile2,146 NaplesMiglio2,025 NetherlandsMijle1,093.63 Place.Measure.U. S. Yards. NorwayMile12,182 PersiaParasang6,076 PolandMile (long)8,100 PortugalMitha2,250 PortugalVara3.609 PrussiaMile (post)8,238 RomeKilometre1,093.63 RomeMile2,025 RussiaVerst1,166.7 RussiaSash
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Roman obelisks were also imported by Augustus and Caligula. Other obelisks are found at Constantinople, Paris, Arles, Florence, etc. The Egyptian obelisks are usually of granite, but there are two small ones in the British Museum made of basalte1,760 ChinaLi608.5 DenmarkMul8,288 DresdenPost-meile7,432 EgyptFeddan1.47 EnglandMile1,760 FlandersMijle1,093.63 FlorenceMiglio1,809 France 1, 60931 miles = 1 kilometre. Kilometre1,093.6 GenoaMile (post)8,527 GermanyMile (15 to 1°)8,10. A planetarium is described in a letter from Angelo Politiano to his friend Francesco Casa, as seen by the former at Florence in the fifteenth century. The inventor was one Lorenzo of Florence, and the apparatus was constructed to illustrate theFlorence, and the apparatus was constructed to illustrate the Ptolemaic theory of the heavens. The various parts were moved by trains of cog-wheels. Life of A. Politiano, published by Cadell and Davis, London, about 1800. A planetary clock was made by Finee, 1553, and a planetarium by De Rheita in 1650.
Mouy (France) (search for this): chapter 15
seeds or nuts are crushed or ground, immersed in bisulphide of carbon, which extracts the oil and resin they contain, but leaves the substance otherwise unaltered. The solution is then removed, the bisulphide distilled off, leaving the oil, like the raw oils extracted by pressure, contaminated to some degree with resinous and coloring matters, which are removed by a second process of refining. Moison's apparatus for removing oil from wool. This process was invented by Moison of Mouy, in France, and used by him in cleansing wool from the swint, as also from the grease and tar with which the sheep had been treated or marked. It was afterward adopted to separate oils, fats, and resins from the substances with which they are combined, and for supplementing the mechanical processes by operating upon oil-cake, the marc of olives, etc. In Moison's process the wool to be subjected to treatment is introduced into a cast-iron cylinder a, surrounded by a jacket into which steam may
West Indies (search for this): chapter 15
he carbed, upon which they are fastened by cleats and stay-rods. The tanks are made of matched planks bolted together. See oil-tank. Oiling-can. Oiler. Cap for oil-can. Oil-car′ry-ing Ves′--sel. One having builtin tanks in the hold to hold oil in bulk. It has conveniences for loading and discharge, and also for allowing expansion and contraction of the oil without overflow of the liquid or collapse of the tank. Tank-car. Molasses is also carried in bulk from the West Indies to Portland and elsewhere. Oil-carrying ship. Oil-cel′lar. An oil-reservoir in the bottom of a journal-box. Oil-cloth. A tarpaulin. Painted canvas for floor-covering. The latter description is prepared from cloth especially woven for the purpose, frequently of great width, and covered on each side by a peculiar series of processes, with paint. Figures or patterns in oil-colors are afterward printed on one side by means of wooden blocks. See floor-cloth. Floor oi<
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 15
ouari-nutCaryocar nuciferum, etc.South AmericaContains a sweet oil. Much used in South America. SunflowerHelianthus annuusEurope, etcSeed yields an oil. Used in making fancy soaps, etc. Tallow (vegetable).Pentadesma butyraSierra LeoneTallow, a term often applied to solid fatty substances obtained from plants. That produced from the seeds of the Stillingia sebifera is used for candles by the Chinese. Stillingia sebiferaChina Bassia butyraceaeN. India WalnutJuglans regia, etcEurope and AmericaAn oil often sold as nut-oil. Used in the arts and to adulterate other oils. Wax (bees)Beeswax, although not strictly a vegetable production, is primarily derived from the pollen of flowers Wax (insect)Fraxinus sinensisChinaA kind of wax deposited by an insect, the coccus pe-la, on the leaves of this species of ash. Wax (Japan)Rhus succedaneaJapanA vegetable wax afforded by the fruit of the tree. Used in candle-making Wax (palm)Copernicia ceriferaBrazilWax obtained from the surface of
Sea Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
uted by much the largest source of supply, but within the past few years cotton-seed is largely used, it as well as linseed yielding a large proportion of oil, beside meal or cake well adapted for feeding cattle or hogs. Cotton-seed (excepting Sea Island) is preferably decorticated previous to being ground and pressed, otherwise the treatment of these and linseed is the same. The seed is first passed between two rollers, one of which revolves more rapidly than the other, subjecting it to a d; e f, plungers and pump-cylinders; g, pipe transmitting pressure to the ram. D is a plunger-press, to be presently described. The product of oil is about 2 gallons from a bushel of linseed, or 56 pounds of hulled cotton-seed; that from Sea Island seed, which does not require hulling, is about 90 gallons from each 100 bushels. Oil-heater, presser, and hydrostatic-press pump. The oil-press was invented by Aristaeus, the Athenian ; so says Pliny. To find the date at which he flouri
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