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William Wallace (search for this): chapter 196
e large ships and ironclads. From my position on the wheel-house, overlooking my entire battery, I had every officer and man under my observation, and I have sincere pleasure in testifying to the fine bearing, zeal, and gallantry of the division officers, viz.: Lieutenant Bartlett and Acting Ensign Rhoades of the first division; Lieutenant Brown, commanding second division; Acting Ensign Laycock, commanding third division; Acting Master Porter, commanding fourth division, and First Lieutenant William Wallace, who, with his fine company of marines, handled most effectively two extra nine-inch guns. Lieutenant Commander Blake, my Executive Officer, is all I can desire in battle-cool and collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, who, whether under fire or any other circumstances, has proved himself without a superior in intelligence or ability on board the vessel. My aid, Master's Ma
W. H. C. Whiting (search for this): chapter 196
horse, which they brought off, killing the orderly, who was the bearer of a despatch from the Chief of Artillery of General Whiting to bring a light battery within the fort, and also brought away from the parapet the flag of the fort. This was dd D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Confederate reports. General Whiting's report. headquarters, Wilmington, December 31, 1864. Colonel — For the information of the General commandire, for the favor of Almighty God, under and by which a signal deliverance has been achieved. Very respectfully, W. H. C. Whiting, Major-General. Lieutenant-Colonel A. Anderson, A. A. and I. G., Headquarters Department of N. C. P. S.--I wit to be understood that in no sense did I assume the command of Colonel Lamb. I was a witness simply, confining my action to observation and advice, and to our communications, and it is as a witness that I report. W. H. C. Whiting, Major-General
, and three tires. The face of the fort was very much ploughed up by the shells from the fleet. If the fort was uninjured (as a defensive work) no artillery known to modern warfare can do it. My impression is, that any considerable number of troops could have stormed and taken the fort immediately after the second day's bombardment, with but little loss. All the officers and men belonging to the New Ironsides served their guns and country well; and I am greatly indebted to Lieutenant Commander Phythian, the Executive Officer, for his energy and ability in getting the crew and ship in such good fighting order. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, William Radford. Commodore, Commanding Iron-clad Division. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding N. A. Squadon, Flag-Ship Malvern, Report of Captain William R. Taylor. United States ship Juniata, off Beaufort, N. C., December 30, 1864. sir — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your General Order, No. 7
A. W. Bradford (search for this): chapter 196
ort, North Carolina, and were not suitable for riding out at anchor such heavy weather. After the south-wester the wind chopped around to the westward and gave us a beautiful spell of weather, which I could not afford to lose, and the transports with the troops not making their appearance, I determined to take advantage of it and attack Fort Fisher and its outworks. On the twenty-third I directed Commander Rhind to proceed and explode the vessel right under the walls of Fort Fisher, Mr. Bradford, of the Coast Survey, having gone in at night and ascertained that we could place a vessel of seven feet draught right on the edge of the beach; Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, commanding Gettysburg, volunteered to go in the Wilderness, Acting Master Henry Arey in command, and tow the Louisiana into position, having assisted in the gale in taking care of the Louisiana after she and the Nansemond (the vessel having her in tow) had lost all their anchors. At half-past 10 P. M. the powder-vessel
I. R. Bartlett (search for this): chapter 196
g short, for the assault. Although fairly exposed, received but few hits, and no damage of the slightest consequence. The enemy's practice was bad on both days, owing, I presume, to the steady and well-directed fire of the large ships and ironclads. From my position on the wheel-house, overlooking my entire battery, I had every officer and man under my observation, and I have sincere pleasure in testifying to the fine bearing, zeal, and gallantry of the division officers, viz.: Lieutenant Bartlett and Acting Ensign Rhoades of the first division; Lieutenant Brown, commanding second division; Acting Ensign Laycock, commanding third division; Acting Master Porter, commanding fourth division, and First Lieutenant William Wallace, who, with his fine company of marines, handled most effectively two extra nine-inch guns. Lieutenant Commander Blake, my Executive Officer, is all I can desire in battle-cool and collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to
William Garvin (search for this): chapter 196
the mass, much of the powder was blown away before ignition, and its effect lost. The fuses were set by the clocks, to one hour and a half, but the explosion did not occur till twenty-two minutes after that time had elapsed, the after part of the vessel being then enveloped in flames. The following officers and men manned the powder-boat: Commander A. C. Rhind; Lieutenant S. W. Preston; Second Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan; Master's Mate Paul Boyden; Frank Lucas, coxswain; William Garvin, captain forecastle; Charles J. Bibber, gunner's mate; John Neil, quarter gunner; Robert Montgomery; captain after-guard; James Roberts, seaman, Charles Hawkins, seaman; Dennis Conlon, seaman; James Sullivan, ordinary seaman; William Hinnegan, second-class fireman; Charles Rice, coal-heaver. The crew were all volunteers from my own vessel, the Agawam. The zeal, patience, and endurance of officers and men were unsurpassed, and I believe no officer could have been better supported.
d man under my observation, and I have sincere pleasure in testifying to the fine bearing, zeal, and gallantry of the division officers, viz.: Lieutenant Bartlett and Acting Ensign Rhoades of the first division; Lieutenant Brown, commanding second division; Acting Ensign Laycock, commanding third division; Acting Master Porter, commanding fourth division, and First Lieutenant William Wallace, who, with his fine company of marines, handled most effectively two extra nine-inch guns. Lieutenant Commander Blake, my Executive Officer, is all I can desire in battle-cool and collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, who, whether under fire or any other circumstances, has proved himself without a superior in intelligence or ability on board the vessel. My aid, Master's Mate Cooper, was prompt in answering signals, and in his spare moments used the twelve-pounder howitzer on the hurricane-dec
J. M. Brown (search for this): chapter 196
few hits, and no damage of the slightest consequence. The enemy's practice was bad on both days, owing, I presume, to the steady and well-directed fire of the large ships and ironclads. From my position on the wheel-house, overlooking my entire battery, I had every officer and man under my observation, and I have sincere pleasure in testifying to the fine bearing, zeal, and gallantry of the division officers, viz.: Lieutenant Bartlett and Acting Ensign Rhoades of the first division; Lieutenant Brown, commanding second division; Acting Ensign Laycock, commanding third division; Acting Master Porter, commanding fourth division, and First Lieutenant William Wallace, who, with his fine company of marines, handled most effectively two extra nine-inch guns. Lieutenant Commander Blake, my Executive Officer, is all I can desire in battle-cool and collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, wh
J. C. Howell (search for this): chapter 196
they would have been in it before dark, and in quiet possession without firing a shot. With great respect, I am your obedient servant, James Alden, Captain. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Com. J. C. Howell. United States steamer Nereus, Beaufort, N. C., January 3, 1865. Admiral — This vessel having been ordered to support the ironclads during the attack on Fort Fisher, on the twenty-fifth day of December, I stood in to three fathoms won the subject, I think he was correct in his views. There was no exception to the excellent conduct of officers and men. I am indebted to Lieutenant H. E. Mullan for intelligent services. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant. J. C. Howell, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding N. A. Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. Report of Com. Daniel Ammen. United States steamer Mohican, off Beaufort, N. C., December 31, 1864. Admiral — I have the honor to acknowledge the re
n. Had the night been obscure, she could have reached a point about one hundred and fifty yards nearer. The vessel, though having steam, was towed in and piloted by the Wilderness to a point within a short distance of her station, when the Wilderness hauled off and remained near to take off the party from the powder-boat. The arrangments and movements of the Wilderness were in charge of Lieutenant R H. Lamson, of the Gettysburg, assisted by Mr. J. S. Bradford, of the coast survey, and Mr. Bowen, bar pilot — the local knowledge and judgment of these gentlemen being of the greatest service to me in perfecting all the arrangements and carrying out the plan successfully. The party on board the Wilderness, commanded by Acting Ensign H. Arey, shared with us whatever of risk or danger attended the enterprise. Our arrangements being completed, we started in from the station vessel--the Kansas, Lieutenant Commanding Watmough--at about 10:30 P. M. At about 11:30 the Wilderness cast off
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