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. Can any calamity upon a nation be worse than war? But let us turn from these sad scenes to a more cheerful picture opening in the far Southwest. Beyond the Mississippi, as Dr. Kavanaugh has already related, his work and that of his co-laborers was greatly blessed of God. In a letter to Bishop Paine, of the M. E. Church, South, he gave a report of the revival and its results in two months: Gen. Fagan's Arkansas Brigade-Members received into Army church, 209; conversions, 85. Gen. Churchill's Arkansas Brigade-Joined the Army church, 112; converted, 35. Gen. Tappan's Arkansas Brigade-Joined, 245; converted, 40. Gen. Parson's Mississippi Brigade-Joined, 85; converted, 35. Total members Army church, 651; conversions, 195. The Army church was organized before my arrival; gotten up by Bro. Martin, (now Bishop M. E. Church, South,) aided by others. It has worked well. In Tappan's brigade, the devoted chaplains have built a large log church, 60 by 80 feet, and are determined
J. C. Keener (search for this): chapter 22
We give a list of those who were sent by the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South: Revs. Leo. Rosser and J. C. Granbery in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the M. E. Church, South, emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Conference appointed one missionary and two chaplains to the army; Memphis, one missionary and six chaplains;
f the General Missionaries, sent out by the Parent Board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a
E. B. Duncan (search for this): chapter 22
te Confederate army will shine as stars forever and ever in the firmament of glory. The earnest purpose of the home Churches to promote the army revival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who were sent by the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South: Revs. Leo. Rosser and J. C. Granbery in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the M. E. Church, South, emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great ha
R. B. Lester (search for this): chapter 22
ies and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these eight Conferences. Of course, the Conferences beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the General Missionaries, sent out by the Parent Board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the St
J. R. Eddleton (search for this): chapter 22
py Christian men. We also give the testimony of one of the most pious and devoted chaplains in the Army of Northern Virginia. Rev. P. F. August, who served with the gallant Fifteenth Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, writes to us: The 15th Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, Pickett's division, shared in the blessings of the great revival in the Confederate army. I have the names of about fifty of that regiment who were converted while in the field of service. One of these, J. R. Eddleton, a very young man from Hanover county, was mortally wounded in a skirmish. When borne off the field on a litter he said to his comrades: Boys, tell my mother how I went --meaning, Tell her that I fell discharging my duty with my face to the enemy. For twenty-four hours he suffered very much, but met death, not only calmly, but triumphantly. He left an assurance that he was accepted with God, and felt that the blessed Saviour would save him forever. His dying request was that his mot
men; and P. refused to leave 13. alone. I obtained leave of absence and made my escape by riding all night alone, and found myself outside of Grant's lines the next morning, and went into Selma, Ala., where I spent the summer. I requested Bishop Paine to give me a commission as a missionary to Gen. Price's army, which was then in Arkansas. I obtained it, and left the house of Robert A. Baker, my cousin, in Alabama, on the 15th of September, 1863. I succeeded in making the trip, crossing t? But let us turn from these sad scenes to a more cheerful picture opening in the far Southwest. Beyond the Mississippi, as Dr. Kavanaugh has already related, his work and that of his co-laborers was greatly blessed of God. In a letter to Bishop Paine, of the M. E. Church, South, he gave a report of the revival and its results in two months: Gen. Fagan's Arkansas Brigade-Members received into Army church, 209; conversions, 85. Gen. Churchill's Arkansas Brigade-Joined the Army church,
Walborn Mooney (search for this): chapter 22
ring universe, I doubt not many thousands of precious souls converted in the late Confederate army will shine as stars forever and ever in the firmament of glory. The earnest purpose of the home Churches to promote the army revival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who were sent by the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South: Revs. Leo. Rosser and J. C. Granbery in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the M. E. Ch
well-known to those who can recall the scenes in the Southwest. One of the most faithful laborers in this corps of our army was Rev. Dr. B. T. Kavanaugh, who has kindly sent us the following account of the revival which prevailed in General Price's corps on this side and beyond the Mississippi: Among those who came out of Missouri with Gen. Price's army were Jno. R. Bennett (your brother), W. M. Patterson, Nathaniel M. Talbott, and myself, besides Bros. Minchell, Harris, Dryden, and McCary. Subsequently we were joined by brother E. M. Marvin (now Bishop) and others. But little visible effect followed our preaching for the first year or two, while the soldier's life was a novelty; but, after two years hard service, the romance of the soldier's life wore off, and a more sober and serious mood seemed to prevail in our camps. The first decided revival that occurred under my observation and ministry was in the State of Mississippi, to which State I had followed General Price
Melville C. Willis (search for this): chapter 22
came out of it strong in the faith of God. Others fell on the field of battle instantly killed. They departed covered with the honors of war and with the glory of a saving faith in Christ. Their record below was one of Christian fidelity — on high, no doubt, it was acceptable to God. Among those who deserve to be specially mentioned are the names of Major John Stewart Walker, an upright, conscientious Christian, and one of the purest men I believe that ever died or lived-also Lieutenants Melville C. Willis and Jones Daniels. The last named two were bosom friends, who likewise fell instantly killed. On the same field and about the same time their lives were yielded a sacrifice to the Southern cause. They were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in death they were not separated. Besides those of the 15th, I have quite a large number of names of soldiers belonging to other regiments in Corse's brigade, who were converted in the army; some of whom I have met since the close
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