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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Elisha H. Ryder (search for this): chapter 14
. Gerrish, Eben W. Lothrop, James P. Farley, Henry W. Bowen, John T. Hadaway, Francis Low, aldermen. 1863, Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, Jesse Gould, James B. Forsyth, Eben W. Lothrop, James F. Farley, Francis Low, John T. Hadaway, aldermen. In 1864, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Rufus Trussell, James B. Forsyth, John H. Osgood, Maurice M. Pigott, Eben W. Lothrop, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. In 1865, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Elisha H. Ryder, Jesse Gould, William O. Haskell, Eben W. Lothrop, Maurice M. Pigott, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. The city-clerk and city-treasurer during all these years was Samuel Bassett. 1861. The first meeting of the city council to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 18th of April, at which the treasurer was authorized to pay out of the city treasury under the direction of the committee on police three thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessar
George W. Blagden (search for this): chapter 14
ops passing through the city, either to or from the seat of war, and to attend to other matters in relation to the volunteers that may come before the city council. The order was amended in the council, so that the expense should not exceed ten thousand dollars, and Messrs. Edmunds, Tyler, Child, Tucker, and Hatch of the council were joined. February 22d, By a previous vote of the city the government with a large assemblage of the people met in Faneuil Hall. Prayer was made by Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D., and Washington's Farewell Address was read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the 7th of April the City-Relief Committee for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Jos
William H. Long (search for this): chapter 14
gs from time to time, and forwarded clothing, lint, and supplies of various kinds by committees chosen for that purpose. Winthrop Incorporated March 27, 1852. Population in 1860, 544; in 1865, 634. Valuation in 1860, $450,000; in 1865, $406,239. The selectmen in 1861 were John Belcher, David Floyd, Richard Shackford; in 1862 and 1863, John Belcher, Richard Shackford, David P. Matthews; in 1864, A. Richardson, Sylvanus Payne, P. P. Floyd; in 1865, John Belcher, Sylvanus Payne, William H. Long. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was Warren Belcher; in 1864 and 1865, E. Floyd. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was E. Floyd; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, John Floyd. Winthrop furnished seventy-two men for the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was ten thousand seven hundred and seventy-four dollars ($1
Sumner Crosby (search for this): chapter 14
s read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the 7th of April the City-Relief Committee for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemetery be set apart for the burial of soldiers; whereupon it was ordered that th
G. Washington Parmenter (search for this): chapter 14
Wightman, mayor; Jonathan Preston, Thomas P. Rich, Silas Peirce, Samuel Hatch, Thomas C. Coffin, Jr., James L. Hanson, Samuel R. Spinney, Nehemiah Gibson, G. Washington Parmenter, Moses Clark, John F. Pray, Elisha T. Wilson, aldermen. In 1862, Joseph M. Wightman, mayor; Thomas P. Rich, Thomas C. Amory, Jr., James L. Hanson, Samuel R. Spinney, G. Washington Parmenter, John F. Pray, Elisha T. Wilson, Francis Richards, Joseph L. Henshaw, Joseph F. Paul, Calvin A. Richards, Otis Norcross, aldermen. In 1863, Frederick W. Lincoln, Jr., mayor; Thomas C. Amory, Jr., Silas Peirce, Samuel R. Spinney, Joseph L. Henshaw, Joseph F. Paul, Sylvanus L. Denio, Moses Clark,ntinued while absent in the military service. The resolves offered by Alderman Wilson were unanimously adopted, with slight verbal amendments. April 24th, Aldermen Parmenter and Spinney, and Messrs. Brown, Borrowscale, and Roberts of the common council were appointed to take charge of the distribution of military stores. The or
Joseph Buckley (search for this): chapter 14
gden, D. D., and Washington's Farewell Address was read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the 7th of April the City-Relief Committee for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemetery be set apart for the buri
Benjamin J. Gerrish (search for this): chapter 14
uring the entire period of the war. Chelsea Incorporated as a town Jan. 10, 1738; as a city March 13, 1857. Population in 1860, 13,395; in 1865, 14,403. Valuation in 1860, $6,780,000; in 1865, $7,706,745. The city officers in 1861 were Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, George W. Churchill, James B. Forsyth, Eben W. Lothrop, Henry W. Bowen, Nehemiah Boynton, Noble M. Perkins, aldermen. In 1862, Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, Jesse Gould, Benjamin J. Gerrish, Eben W. Lothrop, James P. Farley, Henry W. Bowen, John T. Hadaway, Francis Low, aldermen. 1863, Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, Jesse Gould, James B. Forsyth, Eben W. Lothrop, James F. Farley, Francis Low, John T. Hadaway, aldermen. In 1864, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Rufus Trussell, James B. Forsyth, John H. Osgood, Maurice M. Pigott, Eben W. Lothrop, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. In 1865, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Elisha
John F. Fenno (search for this): chapter 14
c. North Chelsea Incorporated March 19, 1848. Name changed to Revere, 1871. Population in 1860, 921; in 1865, 858. Valuation in 1860, $770,000; in 1865, $860,359. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 were Benjamin Shurtleff, Ensign Kimball, Edward Pratt; in 1865, Benjamin Shurtleff, Ensign Kimball, William S. Janvin. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was William T. Hall. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Benjamin H. Dewing; in 1865, John F. Fenno. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war during this year, although the families of the soldiers belonging to the town were properly cared for by the selectmen. 1862. March 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding seven hundred dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for t
Elisha Wells (search for this): chapter 14
ommon council, be transmitted to the respective families of the deceased. mayor's office, city Hall, Chelsea, June 21, 1862. To the city council; I have too long delayed notifying you officially of the presentation to the city, by Lieutenant-Colonel Wells of the First Massachusetts Regiment, of a musket taken from the redoubt near Yorktown, which was carried by Company H, on the 26th of April, 1862. Colonel Wells had command of the expedition, and he felt that as the Chelsea boys had the Colonel Wells had command of the expedition, and he felt that as the Chelsea boys had the honor of the exploit, and had also its fearful cost, so the city should retain possession of this memento. Yours truly, Frank B. Fay, Mayor. July 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding eighteen thousand dollars for the payment of bounties of seventy-five dollars to volunteers to fill the quota of Chelsea under the recent call of the President for more men. July 28th, The bounty to volunteers was increased to one hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to bo
Benjamin Brown (search for this): chapter 14
on on Monday next at six o'clock. April 19th, One hundred thousand dollars were appropriated for the good care and comfort of the soldiers who may be in Boston. April 22d, It was resolved that for any officer of the city who should enter the military service his place should be kept and his pay continued while absent in the military service. The resolves offered by Alderman Wilson were unanimously adopted, with slight verbal amendments. April 24th, Aldermen Parmenter and Spinney, and Messrs. Brown, Borrowscale, and Roberts of the common council were appointed to take charge of the distribution of military stores. The order concerning city officers who may enlist was reconsidered and referred to a special committee, with authority to consult the city solicitor on the legality of said order. April 29th, The mayor presented a letter from William Evans, Esq., tendering to the city the use of his large new building on Tremont street for military uses. The offer was accepted and the
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