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Frank T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 2.32
ed to break Johnston's line near its center. Sherman had hoped to seize the railroad south of Allas it was undertaken. He firmly believed that Sherman was feeling for his right. He therefore withenth Corps (about 5,000 men) was sent back by Sherman to strengthen McPherson's command, because Mc Thus matters remained until June 1st, when Sherman's characteristic movement from right to left y had had a few days before. On June 14th, Sherman, after reconnoitering the lines of the enemy one from Pine Top. In this way the story that Sherman himself had fired the gun that killed Polk, wnt. Just before Johnston left Muddy Creek, Sherman declared: His (Johnston's) left was his weak right, he would have done a wise act, and! (Sherman) was compelled to presume that such was his oI was much annoyed, and as soon as Thomas and Sherman heard of the break they were. also worried. the Bald Knob and restored the continuity of Sherman's front. The concentration of Johnston's f[8 more...]
C. G. Harker (search for this): chapter 2.32
ere was room. Thus Thomas with the Third Corps worked forward with his left touching the Ackworth Railroad, and soon made all proper connections with McPherson, who was advancing on the other side of the same railway. Part of my corps (General C. G. Harker's brigade), at this time under the cover of a heavy artillery fire instituted by the division commander, charged a portion of Hardee's salient angle with great vigor, effected a lodgment in part of it, where the roads gave him some protectnd held several rods of these works, capturing the defenders. This was one of the few cases in which intrenchments, strongly constructed and well manned were during the war, carried by direct front assaults. I first remarked the neatness of Harker's brigade, even during our rough field duty. At inspections and musters his men had on white gloves, and excelled the lauded Eastern troops in the completeness and good order of their equipments. The unusual pains taken by him and his brigade t
y out his instructions, and was, indeed, ready to do so with his usual skill and promptness, when Hardee's dispositions warned him of his danger in uncovering his flank and of making the movement in the face of an active and energetic enemy. Hardee was pressing his lines constantly, probably in anticipation of just such a movement. The battle began at 3.30 P. M. The attacking column of the Confederates had been able to form out of sight in the woods for the most part; those in front of Oosterhaus's division (of Logan) gathered under shelter of a deep ravine, and then rushed en masse to within fifty yards of his line, where they were mowed down by the hundred. The Sixteenth Corps (Dodge's) had also a considerable part in this battle. Walker's Confederate division had found its way at first, with the design of a demonstration only, quite up to the well-prepared barricades of Dodge. This assault, though most desperate and determined, was promptly and gallantly met and repulsed.
at last reached the end of Johnston's troops, I answered: Attack! The order was promptly obeyed. The men sprang forward and made charges and a vigorous assault. I found Johnston's front covered by strong intrenchments. A drawing back of the trenches like a traverse had deceived us. Johnston had forestalled us, and was on hand fully prepared. In the first desperate charge, Hazen's brigade was in front. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, somewhat to its left. Scribner's brigade was in that front. The plan had been, though not carried out, that McLean's brigade of Schofield's command, which was the intended support on our right, should show itself clearly on open ground, attract the attention of the enemy to that part of the line, while Wood and Johnson moved upon what was supposed to be the extreme right of the Confederates' position. In this conflict Wood, the division commander, during this gloomy day met with a loss similar to mine. An officer, M
J. A. Sladen (search for this): chapter 2.32
olonel, can't you now rush your men forward and seize that Bald Knob He answered: Yes, sir, I can. I then said: Go ahead! He sounded the advance and all the men of the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry sprang forward, and, at a run, within fifteen minutes had crowned the knoll. It was Colonel Frank Askew, and he had done with 200 men what I had intended Nodine to do with his entire brigade. Leaving orders for Nodine and Kirby to hurry up their brigades, I mounted and, followed by McDonald and Sladen, galloped to the front and stayed there with the gallant Fifteenth Ohio men till the reinforcements with shovels and picks had joined them. The suddenness of our charge and the quickness of our riflemen cleared the Bald Knob and restored the continuity of Sherman's front. The concentration of Johnston's forces compelled us at this time to be on the lookout for just such offensive movements. Before, however, bringing our troops forward into immediate contact with the Kenesaw barricades
John Newton (search for this): chapter 2.32
uck them were only trending to the Confederate rear. Wood's men were badly repulsed; he had in a few minutes over 800 killed. While this attack was going on, Newton's and Stanley's divisions of my corps near New Hope Church were attempting to divert attention by a strong demonstration, but the Confederates there behind their , could play with an enfilading fire upon the Confederate works. After some cannonading, seeing the evident intention of a further movement to the rear, I thrust Newton's and Wood's divisions into action early in the day; charging with great vigor, they captured the works in their front, taking about 100 prisoners. Confederaterigade of the enterprising Harker already held the intrenchments which he had captured, and seeing the great advantage of securing them, I hurried in the whole of Newton's division. The situation then was such that Johnston could no longer delay his retrograde movement. Just before Johnston left Muddy Creek, Sherman declared
e firmly believed that Sherman was feeling for his right. He therefore withdrew Polk, who was located at his center, and marched him parallel to those of us who took the Confederate accounts that Johnston had ridden from Marietta with Hardee and Polk till he reached Pine Mountain (Pine Top). Quite a number of persons had gatheredcatter. They for the most part did so, and he himself hurried under cover. But Polk, who was quite stout and very dignified, walked slowly, probably because he did fragment of an exploded shell, and was instantly killed. We were apprised of Polk's death by our vigilant and skillful signal officers, who, having gained the keyt read their messages to each other: Why don't you send me an ambulance for General Polk's body was the one from Pine Top. In this way the story that Sherman himself had fired the gun that killed Polk, which was circulated for a time with much persistency, was explained. Nobody on the Union side knew who constituted the group.
forestalled us, and was on hand fully prepared. In the first desperate charge, Hazen's brigade was in front. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, sr men pushed rapidly forward, driving the opposing skirmishers before them. As Hazen pressed on, the left of his brigade still seemed to overlap his enemy's right, dicate that our tedious march was to conduct us to a great success. But, while Hazen and the remainder of Wood's division were gaining ground, Johnson's division, which was at Hazen's left, was going on toward Pickett's Mill. This was situated on a branch of the Pumpkin Vine Creek. Here the leading brigade received quite a se the new direction, and so stopped the whole division from moving up abreast of Hazen. This halting and change left Wood's division completely uncovered, and, worsenfederate intrenched line was simply a sharp angle of it. The breastworks where Hazen's devoted men first struck them were only trending to the Confederate rear. W
Edward McCook (search for this): chapter 2.32
completeness and good order of their equipments. The unusual pains taken by him and his brigade to appear clean and properly attired and well equipped did not, as we observed, detract from its energy and success in action. In the afternoon Ed. McCook's cavalry followed up this success by getting around the left flank of Hardee, and pursued his cavalry down along the Dallas-Marietta wagon road and across Mud Creek. McCook in his venturesome sallies succeeded in getting within five or six miMcCook in his venturesome sallies succeeded in getting within five or six miles of Marietta. He captured two hospitals with five commissioned officers and thirty-five men, also several attendants and nurses. While securing these partial successes I saw, near my right, the most remarkable feat performed by any troops during the campaign. Baird's division (Palmer's corps), in a comparatively open field, put forth a heavy skirmish line, which continued such a rapid fire of rifles as to keep down a corresponding welldefended Confederate line of men, while the picks and
Joseph A. Sladen (search for this): chapter 2.32
leveland, Tenn., where good air and good nursing brought him so near to recovery that he joined me again during this campaign at Jonesboro. I think Harry Stinson was the most unselfish man I ever saw, was the remark of another of my aids, Captain J. A. Sladen. Wood's division was at last drawn out of the marching column and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. Thg field work, just in the edge of heavy timber near his left and well to the front, whence he could shell the enemy now intrenched on the Knob. Very early, with a couple of staff officers, my faithful orderly, McDonald, and private secretary, J. A. Sladen, Thirty-third Massachusetts (afterwards my aid-de-camp), I rode to the four-gun battery; leaving my comrades I took a stand on the improvised fort where I could see and direct every move. A Confederate battery shelled us fearfully and we repl
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