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d an attack upon us at New Market or at Harrisonburg. See Jackson's letter to Lee, April 23, given in substance in Campaign in the Valley of Virginia in 1861-1862 the force covering Fredericksburg. On the twenty-eighth of April he applied to Lee for a command sufficiently large to enable him to march out and attack Banks. On the 29th Lee replied that the Federal force at Fredericksburg was too large to admit of any diminution of his own, but suggested that he could have General Edward would be fraught with the happiest results. See Taylor's Four years with General Lee, p. 38. See also Narrative of Military Operations directed during the late Wold Banks in check. See Jackson's official report, containing a letter to General Lee, dated April 29, 1862. All the Rebel forces then located in the valley, icksburg to join General McDowell at that place. On the fourteenth of May General Lee heard of Shields's movement towards Front Royal, and wrote Jackson that it w
from flight across the passes of the Blue Ridge towards Washington, while Ashby's cavalry with Flournoy, crossing the South Fork of the Shenandoah, moved to intercept the little band to the west towards Strasburg. Ashby directed his march as far to the west as Buckton, where a bridge and some fortifications were occupied by the two companies from my brigade; Flournoy's movements were made between Buckton and Front Royal. This force quickly threw themselves into the depot building and Mr. Jenkins's house and stable, and from this cover maintained a very spirited contest with the Confederate cavalry, in which fell Captains Sheets and Fletcher, two of the best of Ashby's officers. But the Federals were finally dispersed. See Campaign in the Valley of Virginia, p. 98. Before the pickets at Front Royal had been fairly dispersed, Colonel Kenly had formed his command on the crest of a hill about a mile north of the town and in rear of his camp. Here with his whole disposable forc
rnpike five miles west of MacDowell, had been discovered by Jackson's engineers. It was a grand opportunity to play his favorite flanking game, and that night Jackson determined to run the hazard of it. But in the mean time Schenck had left Franklin. Making thirty-four miles in twenty-three hours, he had reached Milroy at 10 A. M. of the 8th, with 1,300 infantry, one battery, and 250 cavalry. Jackson's reconnoissance on Litlington's Hill (the open ground on the western ridge) made it lookilled, 28 ; wounded, 225; and 3 missing. Campaign in the Valley of Virginia, by William Allan, pp. 77, 78. When the Federals had safely withdrawn from the battle-field, General Schenck lighted his camp-fires and fell back in the direction of Franklin. This was done without loss either of men or material, except of some stores for which Milroy had no transportation. On the ninth of May Jackson moved into MacDowell and fed his troops. On the tenth of May Jackson moved forward in pursuit.
Brockenbrough (search for this): chapter 8
's brigade (6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Louisiana regiments), and Wheat's battalion of Trimble's brigade (21st North Carolina, 21st Georgia, 15th Alabama, 16th Mississippi), and Elzey's (13th Virginia and 1st Maryland); of Courtenay's (6 guns) and Brockenbrough's (4 guns) batteries, and of the Second and Sixth Virginia Cavalry under Colonels Munford and Flournoy, numbering (including the cavalry) about 8,000,--increased Jackson's effective force to about 17,000 men, with 11 batteries, containing 48 Cooke's Life of Jackson, p. 144. General George H. Steuart, with the Second and Sixth Virginia cavalry, moved northward to Newtown, a distance of ten miles; General Ewell, with Trimble's brigade, the First Maryland Regiment, Courtenay's and Brockenbrough's batteries, was ordered to move to Winchester, on the main Front Royal turnpike, a distance of nineteen miles; while Jackson in person, in command of. the main body of his army, proceeded in the direction of Middletown, Johnston's Narrati
A. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 8
setts. of infantry at Strasburg, commanded by Brigadier-General A. S. Williams, numbering less than thirty-six hundred men present for duty. See General Williams's Report. There were also at Strasburg, of cavalry 800, and of artillery ten Parroon the road between Front Royal and Middletown) as to General Williams may seem proper. The General is absent, but I have to us at Strasburg, the order sent me in pencil from General Williams's adjutant-general was received, and Banks's retreat (Captains Abbott and Cogswell), with a third company (Captain Williams) as flankers. At a short distance in advance were th, platoons from Companies B and C, Captains Cogswell and Williams. The increased fire produced a marked effect upon the en, I withdrew without a word from him of his plans. General Williams, commanding the division, was calmly sleeping in the wford,--in night array, had listened to my interview with Williams; but under the circumstances these gentlemen were men of
Courtenay (search for this): chapter 8
ivision,--made up of Taylor's brigade (6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Louisiana regiments), and Wheat's battalion of Trimble's brigade (21st North Carolina, 21st Georgia, 15th Alabama, 16th Mississippi), and Elzey's (13th Virginia and 1st Maryland); of Courtenay's (6 guns) and Brockenbrough's (4 guns) batteries, and of the Second and Sixth Virginia Cavalry under Colonels Munford and Flournoy, numbering (including the cavalry) about 8,000,--increased Jackson's effective force to about 17,000 men, with 1n was in motion. Cooke's Life of Jackson, p. 144. General George H. Steuart, with the Second and Sixth Virginia cavalry, moved northward to Newtown, a distance of ten miles; General Ewell, with Trimble's brigade, the First Maryland Regiment, Courtenay's and Brockenbrough's batteries, was ordered to move to Winchester, on the main Front Royal turnpike, a distance of nineteen miles; while Jackson in person, in command of. the main body of his army, proceeded in the direction of Middletown,
side of a creek. In this posture of affairs, Jackson with his escort came unconsciously almost up to it. He was received by Major Dwight, who commanded the rear, by a volley delivered at short range with perfect coolness and great effect. Major Dwight's formation was judicious: Captain Abbott commanded one platoon, posted on one side of the road; Captain Cogswell another, on the other side ; while in the centre were two platoons from these companies formed in square, under command of Lieutenant Grafton. The effect of this fire was a surprise; Jackson's cavalry escort, upon whom it fell, drew rein, wavered for a moment, and fell back out of range. Then came a single shell from a Confederate battery, which was replied to by another volley from the rear-guard, delivered without seeing the enemy. Colonel Andrews now changed the rear-guard, substituting Company I (Captain Underwood) and Company D (Captain Savage)as flankers. The remainder of the regiment then moved on to where thei
A. H. Quint (search for this): chapter 8
k and teamsters would have reached Newtown, distant twelve miles, at between six and seven A. M. Steuart, with his cavalry, starting from Cedarville at daylight, would have moved over his ten miles by six or seven o'clock, and the refugees would have returned to Strasburg, twelve miles, in about three and a half or four hours, or by eleven o'clock A. M. We may now proceed with our main column. As soon as ordered, the movement was instantaneous. It was eleven o'clock in the morning. Quint (Boston Traveller, May, 1862). Colonel Andrews' Report, Moore's Rebellion Record, vol. IX. The two brigades of infantry were in the order of march indicated: Colonel Donelly in front, myself in rear, and General Hatch with his cavalry as rear-guard,--instructed then, but too late, to do what Banks says in his report he had ordered to be done at three A. M. Our course was directly for Winchester; the distance was eighteen miles. Fortunately for us, the day was cool and misty. We had cleared
ssness of the effort to cut his way through the enemy, turned to the left with his artillery, and made his way by narrow and obscure roads westward and northward, to effect, if possible, a junction with the main column. Six companies of the Fifth New York cavalry and six of the First Vermont, after repeated efforts to join the column, fell back to Strasburg. The whole command under General Hatch at this time consisted of the Fifth New York cavalry, Colonel De Forrest; First Vermont, Colonel Tompkins; five Companies of the First Maine, Lieutenant-Colonel Douty. The Hampton Battery and one section of Best's Battery, half of the First Maine and two Companies of the First Vermont, had accompanied the column, and at Middletown were sent towards Front Royal to observe Jackson. The subsequent history of this command we may as well give here. The six companies of the Fifth New York cavalry, under Colonel De Forrest, came into our lines via Hancock, at Clear Spring, north of the Potom
e's brigade (21st North Carolina, 21st Georgia, 15th Alabama, 16th Mississippi), and Elzey's (13th Virginia and 1st Maryland); of Courtenay's (6 guns) and Brockenbrough's (4 guns) batteries, and of the Second and Sixth Virginia Cavalry under Colonels Munford and Flournoy, numbering (including the cavalry) about 8,000,--increased Jackson's effective force to about 17,000 men, with 11 batteries, containing 48 guns. See Campaign in the Valley of Virginia in 1861--1862. were to be precipitated ups of Front Royal; and this so secretly, that not a single inhabitant suspected Jackson's presence. Cooke's Life of Jackson, p. 141. On the twenty-third of May Jackson's army, with three regiments of cavalry, Cavalry regiments of Ashby, Munford, and Flournoy, with eight battalions of artillery. was within twelve miles of our principal outpost at Front Royal. The whole of our feeble command on this same Friday morning, at Strasburg and stretched along the railroad towards and at Front
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