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San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ks from now. About brevets for your officers, I suppose the fact is just the same as with everybody else, Mr. Stanton has been too busy to sign the papers. There is a pile of them about two feet high now lying upon his table, and I presume, though I don't know, that yours are in with the rest. I propose to show your letter to General Grant, but to no one else. Rawlins has gone to Galena with his wife. General Grant has gone to Albany to celebrate the Fourth. General Halleck is here on his way to San Francisco. Slocum is assigned to command Mississippi, and I suppose Steedman will have Georgia. A heap of generals will be mustered out very soon, but you are not in the lot. Poe is here getting up his engineer's work from Sherman's campaigns, but I haven't seen him. Ulffers is with him. He came to see me the other day. Peter Hains got his leave of absence about three weeks since to take command of a New Jersey regiment, so that he is a colonel in spite of everything.
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
t promoted him to the rank of major-general in the regular army, and, as an additional expression of its satisfaction, sent Dana to deliver the commission in person. The journey was made by special train over the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Harper's Ferry, and thence on horseback with a cavalry escort to Sheridan's camp, some fifty miles farther up the Valley. After performing the agreeable duty intrusted to him, and riding through the enthusiastic army, Dana returned overland to Washington btle, horned, hairy, and woolly. This in the Luray and Moorefield valleys, as well as in the main valley. Sheridan has fallen back to the Opequan, and has fortified his position somewhere near Smithfield, with the railroad to supply him from Harper's Ferry. Under these circumstances, and with Loudon and Fauquier similarly devastated, I don't see how the Rebels can try it again in that direction this fall, and my judgment is clear that Crook with his force will be ample to do all that is needed
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
at Grant finally started for Nashville himself, but reached here with the news of the first day's successful battle. That, of course, stopped him and changed all disposition to find fault into praise and admiration. The fact that Sherman left Thomas with insufficient forces to fight the rebel army is indisputable, but yet I do not think that Sherman is to be blamed for it. He did not start for Savannah until he had positive information from Rawlins that A. J. Smith's troops would reach Paducah in four days, and from other quarters that the horses and equipments of your cavalry would be got forward in ample season. Those things being determined-and I do not see why he need have had any doubt with regard to them — there was no reason for him to wait any longer. That A. J. Smith should be thirty days instead of four is not astonishing, but Sherman had no cause to anticipate it. But without looking too curiously into the past, let us admit that everything has turned out for the
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 22
him to Washington, where they arrived on April 13, 1865. The next day Dana had an interesting interview with Lincoln at the White House, in regard to the arrest of Jacob Thompson, a Confederate commissioner, who was trying to make his way from Canada through Maine to Europe. Stanton thought he ought to be caught, but sent Dana to refer the matter to the President. As soon as the latter understood the question to be answered, he said, No, I rather think not. When you have got an elephant by the Pacific coast; Sheridan west of the Mississippi; Thomas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and the Northern States between the mountains and the Mississippi; Sherman, the South; and Meade, the Atlantic coast from the southern boundary of South Carolina to Canada, with a district commander in every State. Mr. Seward continues to get better. Sherman's excitement is cooling off, and I suppose he begins to think he has gone too far. The President is as lenient as was his predecessor; I think he even beat
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Washington news there is not much to tell. The most interesting question just at this moment is whether the antislavery amendment of the Constitution will pass the House of Representatives next week. It is hoped that a sufficient number of Democratic members will now vote for it to pass it, and send it to the States for ratification; but I can't tell whether the hope is well founded. . . . I came near leaving here about a fortnight ago to take the place of adjutant-general of the State of New York. The inducements were complete control of all military appointments among the troops of that State, the opportunity of great political usefulness, and an amount of pay on which I could live. But Mr. Stanton would not consent, and so I shall stay here for the present. But as soon as the war is so far over that I can properly leave, I shall attend to my own affairs. ... From City Point I have no news. Joe Bowers was here a fortnight since, looking as well as ever. Dunn was up on
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
our old aide-de-camp Hudson In the Knoxville expedition. now wears the straps of a lieutenant-colonel. It is rather astonishing to see what an enormous crop of brigadier-generals has sprung up within the last few months. I should say that there were more officers of that rank than of any lower grade. Merritt and Custer have both gone with Sheridan, whose command embraces the States of Arkansas and Texas alone, leaving Pope to command Missouri and the Northwest, and Canby to command Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Sherman's troops are now all camped just outside of Washington north of the Potomac, it having been found advisable to separate them from the Army of the Potomac, whose camps are all on the south side of the river. A good many fights have occurred between the private soldiers of the two armies. I have heard of one or two men who have been killed, and one or two who have been seriously wounded. Sherman's men are also pretty troublesome to the farmers and oth
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
news from Badeau, who I suppose has not much to do except to write private letters. I notice that your old aide-de-camp Hudson In the Knoxville expedition. now wears the straps of a lieutenant-colonel. It is rather astonishing to see what an enormous crop of brigadier-generals has sprung up within the last few months. I should say that there were more officers of that rank than of any lower grade. Merritt and Custer have both gone with Sheridan, whose command embraces the States of Arkansas and Texas alone, leaving Pope to command Missouri and the Northwest, and Canby to command Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Sherman's troops are now all camped just outside of Washington north of the Potomac, it having been found advisable to separate them from the Army of the Potomac, whose camps are all on the south side of the river. A good many fights have occurred between the private soldiers of the two armies. I have heard of one or two men who have been killed, and one or two
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
r be put in command of the whole, but no reply has been received. It is dreadful to say that, with the large force assembled for this campaign, there is not a reasonable certainty as to what will be its result. Sheridan says that cavalry is of no great value on the James River, because the country is so broken, and on the south side so swampy, that it cannot be used with effect. He suggests that another division be brought up to act from this direction. I fall back on my faith in Providence. That will bring us out if human devices fail. It was in pursuance of Sheridan's suggestion that my division of cavalry was also ordered from the James to Washington on August 4th, and a few days later to the Valley of Virginia. On August 29th Dana, who had accompanied me in my march through Washington, wrote to me as follows: Affairs generally seem to be in a much better condition than when you were here. Farragut's success at Mobile has done much to revive the public mind
l and his friend Roscoe Conkling went with him, but the party did not reach City Point till the morning of the 5th, by which time the excitement was all over and there was but little to learn at that place. Lincoln had also become impatient, and had gone to Richmond the day before, and this left Dana and his party nothing to do but to follow him. They reached the captured capital of the Confederacy early that afternoon, and after walking about the town and learning what they could from General Weitzel, who had occupied it on the 3d, Dana began his search for the records and documents of the Confederate government. In this he was but partly successful, for the most valuable papers had been sent off to the South, while the others had been badly disarranged and scattered. Dana gathered up such as could be found, and sent them to Washington, where they became the nucleus of the great collection now in the possession of the government. During his stay at Richmond Dana saw much of the
of conspirators capture and confinement of Jefferson Davis visits Fort Monroe events and great review at Washington returns to civil life Immediately after Early had withdrawn to the south side of the Potomac, and left Washington to comparative quiet and safety, Dana resumed his routine duties as Assistant Secretary of War, day for his wagons, when he might possibly have been fighting. It was only a few hours till the telegraph brought the news of Sheridan's complete victory over Early at Cedar Creek. His army had been surprised at dawn, attacked in flank, and driven pell-mell from its camps, but it had rallied of its own accord and formed a new is to be tried is, so far as I know, not yet determined. He has been indicted by the grand jury of this city for participation in the raid which Breckenridge and Early made here last summer, it being necessary to have some overt act with which to sustain the charge of treason. Possibly, however, owing to the great difficulty of
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